Thor Kvinge

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Thor Kvinge (born Os, Bergen, Norway 23 December 1929) is a Norwegian oceanographer, polar explorer, scientist, and researcher of Antarctica. Kvinge Peninsula bears his name. He was an assistant professor at the University of Bergen until 1978 and Senior Scientist at Christian Michelsen Research until 1996.

Antarctica Polar continent in the Earths southern hemisphere

Antarctica is Earth's southernmost continent. It contains the geographic South Pole and is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,000,000 square kilometres, it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.

Kvinge Peninsula is a snow-covered peninsula at the north side of Palmer Inlet terminating in Cape Bryant, on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey in 1974, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Thor Kvinge, a Norwegian oceanographer from the University of Bergen. Kvinge was employed by the Christian Michelsens Institutt and was a member of the International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions, 1968, 1969 and 1970.

University of Bergen university in Norway

The University of Bergen is a public university located in Bergen, Norway. The university today serves approximately 17,000 students, and is one of eight universities in Norway.

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Career

Kvinge participated in the IWSOE-Cruises in 1968, 1969, 1970 and in 1973. In 1969 and 1970 he served as Chief Scientist (scientific leader) of the Weddell Sea Expedition. [1]

International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions

The International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions or IWSOE are a series of scientific research expeditions to the Weddell Sea begun in 1967, involving cooperation among Norway, Canada, Chile and the United States.

In 1978 he participated in the Ross Ice Shelf Program "CRISP". He retired in 1996.

Legacy

Kvinge Peninsula, located on the Antarctic continent, was mapped by the United States Geological Survey in 1974, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for the contributions of Thor Kvinge to Antarctic research.

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

The Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names is an advisory committee of the United States Board on Geographic Names responsible for recommending names for features in Antarctica. The United States does not recognise territorial boundaries within Antarctica, so ACAN will assign names to features anywhere within the continent, in consultation with other national nomenclatural bodies where appropriate.

Related Research Articles

Weddell Sea Part of the Southern Ocean between Coats Land and the Antarctic Peninsula

The Weddell Sea is part of the Southern Ocean and contains the Weddell Gyre. Its land boundaries are defined by the bay formed from the coasts of Coats Land and the Antarctic Peninsula. The easternmost point is Cape Norvegia at Princess Martha Coast, Queen Maud Land. To the east of Cape Norvegia is the King Haakon VII Sea. Much of the southern part of the sea is covered by a permanent, massive ice shelf field, the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf.

Finn Ronne American explorer

Finn Ronne was a Norwegian-born U.S. citizen and Antarctic explorer.

West Antarctica geographic region

West Antarctica, or Lesser Antarctica, one of the two major regions of Antarctica, is the part of that continent that lies within the Western Hemisphere, and includes the Antarctic Peninsula. It is separated from East Antarctica by the Transantarctic Mountains and is covered by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. It lies between the Ross Sea, and the Weddell Sea. It may be considered a giant peninsula stretching from the South Pole towards the tip of South America.

Larsen Harbour

Larsen Harbour is a narrow 2.6 miles (4.2 km) long inlet of indenting volcanic rocks and sheeted dykes known as the Larsen Harbour Formation. It is a branch of Drygalski Fjord, entered 2.5 miles (4 km) west-northwest of Nattriss Head, at the southeast end of South Georgia. It was charted by the German Antarctic Expedition, 1911–12, under Filchner, who named it for Captain Carl Anton Larsen a Norwegian Antarctic Explorer, who made significant contributions to the exploration of Antarctica. The most significant being the first discovery of fossils, for which he received the Back Grant from the Royal Geographical Society. Larsen is also considered the founder of the Antarctic whaling industry and the settlement at Grytviken, South Georgia.

El-Sayed Glacier glacier in Antarctica

El-Sayed Glacier is a glacier about 15 nautical miles long which drains the northeast slopes of Zuncich Hill in Marie Byrd Land. It flows northeast to enter Land Glacier at the south side of Mount Shirley. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–65, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Sayed Z. El-Sayed, a United States Antarctic Research Program oceanographer on the International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions, 1967–68 and 1969–70.

Weddell Gyre One of the two gyres that exist within the Southern Ocean

The Weddell Gyre is one of the two gyres that exist within the Southern Ocean. The gyre is formed by interactions between the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Antarctic Continental Shelf. The gyre is located in the Weddell Sea, and rotates clockwise. South of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and spreading northeast from the Antarctic Peninsula, the gyre is an extended large cyclone. Where the northeastern end, ends at 30°E, which is marked by the southward turn of the ACC. The northern part of the gyre spreads over the Southern Scotia Sea and goes northward to the South Sandwich Arc. Axis of the gyre is over the southern flanks of the South Scotia, America-Antarctic, and Southwest Indian Ridges. In the southern part of the gyre, the westward return flow is about 66Sv, while in the northern rim current, there is an eastward flow of 61Sv.

USNS <i>Eltanin</i> (T-AK-270)

USNS Eltanin (T-AK-270/T-AGOR-8) was an Eltanin-class cargo ship with an ice-breaking hull acquired by the U.S. Navy in 1957 and then operated by the Navy in a non-commissioned status, named after Eltanin, a star in the constellation Draco. Her designation was changed to that of an oceanographic research ship in 1962 when she operated in Antarctic waters.

Instituto Antártico Argentino Argentinean Antarctic program

The Instituto Antártico Argentino is the Argentine federal agency in charge of orientating, controlling, addressing and performing scientific and technical research and studies in the Antarctic.

Bills Gulch glacier in Antarctica

Bills Gulch is a glacier on the southeast side of Hemimont Plateau, the northern of two glaciers flowing east from the plateau upland into the head of Trail Inlet, on the east coast of Graham Land. This glacier was used by the sledge party under Paul H. Knowles which traversed the Antarctic Peninsula from the East Base of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) on its way to Hilton Inlet in 1940. It was named by USAS for a lead dog that died at this point. The unlikely name has been approved because of its wide use on maps and in reports.

Cline Glacier is a large glacier that drains the vicinity at the east side of Mount Jackson and flows generally southeast between Schirmacher Massif and Rowley Massif into the head of Odom Inlet, on the east side of Palmer Land. It was mapped by United States Geological Survey in 1974, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for David R. Cline, United States Antarctic Research Program biologist on the International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions in 1968 and 1969.

Cordini Glacier is a broad glacier that drains the Mount Bailey vicinity and flows between Lewis Point and James Nunatak to the east coast of Palmer Land. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Argentine scientist I. Rafael Cordini, the author of reports on the geology and ice of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Weddell Sea region.

Muus Glacier is a glacier entering the north side of Odom Inlet between Snyder Peninsula and Strømme Ridge, on the east coast of Palmer Land. Mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1974. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for David Muus, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) oceanographer aboard USCGC Northwind in the Ross Sea area, 1971–72, and a participant in the Weddell Sea Oceanographic Investigations aboard USCGC Glacier, 1974-75.

Strømme Ridge is a broad ice-covered ridge, 15 nautical miles (28 km) long, trending northwest-southeast between the Muus and Soto Glaciers. The ridge terminates at the north side of Odom Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey in 1974 and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Jan A. Strømme,a Norwegian oceanographer from the University of Bergen, a member of the International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions, 1968 and 1969.

Foster Peninsula is a high ice-covered peninsula between Palmer Inlet and Lamplugh Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey in 1974, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Theodore D. Foster, a United States Antarctic Research Program oceanographer on the International Weddell Sea Expedition, 1969. He was party leader on Weddell Sea investigations, 1972–73 and 1974–75.

Siniff Bay is a bay 13 nautical miles (24 km) wide between Verleger Point and Melville Point, along the coast of Marie Byrd Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959-65. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Donald B. Siniff, leader of a United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) party that studied population dynamics and behavior of Weddell seals in the McMurdo Sound area, 1971-72. He also worked in the McMurdo Station area the three preceding austral summers and participated in the International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expedition, 1967-68. Siniff continued to study Weddell seals in McMurdo Sound for many years with his last trip to the Antarctic in 2000. He is retired from the University of Minnesota and serves as a professor emeritus.

Rankin Glacier is a glacier about 12 nautical miles (22 km) long on the east side of Palmer Land. It flows southeast and then east along the south side of Schirmacher Massif to join the Cline Glacier just inland from the head of Odom Inlet. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1974. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for John S. Rankin, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist on the International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expeditions, 1968 and 1969.

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