Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names

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The Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (ACAN or US-ACAN) is an advisory committee of the United States Board on Geographic Names responsible for recommending names for features in Antarctica. The United States does not recognise territorial boundaries within Antarctica, so ACAN will assign names to features anywhere within the continent, in consultation with other national nomenclatural bodies where appropriate.

United States Board on Geographic Names US geographic naming government agency

The United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) is a federal body operating under the United States Secretary of the Interior. The purpose of the board is to establish and maintain uniform usage of geographic names throughout the federal government of the United States.

Antarctica Polar continent in the Earths southern hemisphere

Antarctica is Earth's southernmost continent. It contains the geographic South Pole and is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14,200,000 square kilometres, it is the fifth-largest continent. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. At 0.00008 people per square kilometre, it is by far the least densely populated continent. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages 1.9 km in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.

ACAN has a published policy on naming, based on priority of application, appropriateness, and the extent to which usage has become established. [1]

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Sikorski Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Sikorski Glacier is a small glacier in the northeast part of Noville Peninsula, Thurston Island. It flows northeast to Bellingshausen Sea between Mounts Palmer and Mount Feury. First roughly delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946-47. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Stephen Sikorski, electronics technician on USS Glacier, who assisted in setting up an automatic weather station on Thurston Island during the United States Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960.

Zinberg Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Zinberg Glacier is a glacier in east Thurston Island; it flows east-northeast into Morgan Inlet between Tierney Peninsula and the promontory ending in Ryan Point. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Cpl. E. Zinberg, U.S. Army photographer in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of Thurston Island and adjacent coastal areas, 1946-47.

Dibble Iceberg Tongue glacier in Antarctica

Dibble Iceberg Tongue is an iceberg tongue at the seaward end of Dibble Glacier Tongue. The names Dibble Glacier and Dibble Glacier Tongue were applied by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in 1955, concurrent with G.D. Blodgett's delineation of the features from aerial photographs taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1946–47). The offshore segment of these two related features was photographed by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions in 1956 and 1959, and the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia subsequently recommended that it be named Dibble Iceberg Tongue. US-ACAN has approved the latter name only for the portion lying seaward of Dibble Glacier Tongue.

Gillespie Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Gillespie Glacier is a small tributary glacier just southwest of Mount Kenyon, descending the west slopes of the Cumulus Hills to enter Shackleton Glacier. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lester F. Gillespie, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) physicist at South Pole Station, winter 1962.

Posadowsky Glacier (Antarctica)

Posadowsky Glacier is a glacier about 9 nautical miles long, flowing north to Posadowsky Bay immediately east of Gaussberg. Posadowsky Bay is an open embayment, located just east of the West Ice Shelf and fronting on the Davis Sea in Kaiser Wilhelm II Land. Kaiser Wilhelm II Land is the part of East Antarctica lying between Cape Penck, at 87°43'E, and Cape Filchner, at 91°54'E, and is claimed by Australia as part of the Australian Antarctic Territory. Other notable geographic features in this area include Drygalski Island, located 45 mi NNE of Cape Filchner in the Davis Sea, and Mirny Station, a Russian scientific research station.

Norway Glacier is an Antarctic tributary glacier about 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, descending the polar plateau just west of Mount Prestrud, and flowing northeast to enter Amundsen Glacier between Mount Bjaaland and Mount Hassel, in the Queen Maud Mountains. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) in association with the many features named in this area for members of Amundsen's Norwegian expedition of 1910-12.

Weldon Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Weldon Glacier is a glacier entering the southeast part of Weddell Sea about 30 nautical miles (60 km) west-southwest of Hayes Glacier. The glacier was discovered in the course of a U.S. Navy LC-130 reconnaissance flight over the coast of Coats Land, November 5, 1967, and was plotted by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from photographs obtained at that time. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Don W. Weldon, U.S. Navy, photographer on that flight.

Myers Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Myers Glacier is a valley glacier about 7 nautical miles long, flowing southwest from Mount Noxon on Thurston Island to Abbot Ice Shelf in Peacock Sound. Delineated from aerial photographs taken by U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 in January 1960. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant (j.g.) Dale P. Myers, U.S. Navy, helicopter pilot aboard USS Burton Island who made exploratory flights to Thurston Island in February 1960.

Plummer Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Plummer Glacier is a short glacier descending east through the Enterprise Hills to the north of Lippert Peak and the Douglas Peaks, in the Heritage Range in Antarctica. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1961-66. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Charles C. Plummer, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) glaciologist at Palmer Station in 1965.

Pelter Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Pelter Glacier is a glacier about 5 nautical miles long on Thurston Island, flowing from the east side of Noville Peninsula into the west side of Murphy Inlet. Delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 in January 1960. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for J.A. Pelter, aerial photographer with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition in 1933-35.

Evans Peninsula

Evans Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long, between Koether Inlet and Cadwalader Inlet in the northeast part of Thurston Island. Cape Braathen is an ice-covered cape at the northwest termination of Evans Peninsula. It was discovered in flights from the USS Burton Island and USS Glacier by personnel of the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Commander Griffith Evans, Jr., commander of the icebreaker Burton Island during this expedition.

Payne Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Payne Glacier is a glacier in the north part of Evans Peninsula, Thurston Island. It flows into the sea east of Cape Walden. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Photographer's Mate J.B. Payne, aircrewman in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of Thurston Island and adjacent coastal areas, 1946-47.

Hale Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Hale Glacier is a glacier about 6 nautical miles (11 km) long, located just east of Mount Simpson on Thurston Island, Antarctica, and flowing southwest to the Abbot Ice Shelf in Peacock Sound. It was delineated from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6 in January 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Bill J. Hale, U.S. Navy, a helicopter pilot aboard USS Burton Island who made exploratory flights to Thurston Island in February 1960.

Long Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Long Glacier is a glacier about 8 nautical miles long in the southeastern part of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It flows south to the Abbot Ice Shelf, 14 nautical miles (26 km) west of Harrison Nunatak. The glacier was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Fred A. Long, Jr., an aviation machinist of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, who wintered at Little America V in 1957 and was in Antarctica in the 1960–61 and 1962–63 seasons.

Lofgren Peninsula

Lofgren Peninsula is an ice-covered peninsula about 22 nautical miles (40 km) long, projecting between Cadwalader Inlet and Morgan Inlet on the northeast side of Thurston Island, Antarctica. The northern extremity of the peninsula is Cape Menzel, a bold rock cape. These features were discovered in helicopter flights from the USS Burton Island and the USS Glacier of the U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition in February 1960, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names. The peninsula was named for Charles E. Lofgren, personnel officer with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition, 1928–30. The cape was named for Reinhard W. Menzel, a geomagnetist-seismologist with the Eights Station winter party, 1965.

Reuning Glacier is a glacier situated on the north side of Beethoven Peninsula, lying within the southwest portion of Alexander Island, Antarctica. The glacier flows in a northwest direction and joins Hushen Glacier in discharging into south Mendelssohn Inlet. The glacier was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from U.S. Navy aerial photographs taken 1967-68 and U.S. Landsat imagery taken 1972-73. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Winifred M. Reuning, Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation (NSF), Editor, Antarctic Journal of the United States, from 1980.

Rexford Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Rexford Glacier is a glacier flowing northeast into the head of Wagoner Inlet on the north side of Thurston Island. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Aviation Radioman Phillip W. Rexford, PBM Mariner aircrewman in the Eastern Group of U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, which obtained aerial photographs of this glacier and adjoining coastal areas, 1946-47.

Clarke Glacier (Marie Byrd Land)

Clarke Glacier is an 8 mile long glacier that drains from Coulter Heights to Hull Bay. It was named in 2003 by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN).

Della Pia Glacier

Della Pia Glacier is a glacier that descends the east slope of Craddock Massif and flows between Mount Mohl and Elfring Peak into Thomas Glacier in the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains in Antarctica.

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