Thorne, Ottery St Mary

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Thorne in the parish of Ottery St Mary in Devon is an historic estate situated on the west side of the River Otter [1] opposite the town of Ottery St Mary. The site is today occupied by Thorne Farm (much of the land of which has been built over by a modern housing estate known as Thorne Farm Way) situated to the immediate north of the town's school and hospital and to the immediate south of the surviving early 17th century grand mansion house of Cadhay. [2]

Ottery St Mary town in the East Devon district of Devon, England

Ottery St Mary, known as "Ottery", is a town and civil parish in the East Devon district of Devon, England, on the River Otter, about 10 miles (16 km) east of Exeter on the B3174. At the 2001 census, the parish, which includes the villages of Metcombe, Fairmile, Alfington, Tipton St John, Wiggaton, and West Hill, had a population of 7,692. The population of the urban area alone at the 2011 census was 4,898. There are two electoral wards in Ottery. The total population of both wards, including the adjacent civil parish of Aylesbeare, at the above census was 9,022. Archaeological excavations in 2014, in advance of a housing development at Island Farm, uncovered a medieval longhouse dating to AD.1250–1350 Ottery is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086, where it appears as 'Otri' and 'Otrei'. 'Oteri Sancte Marie' is first mentioned in 1242. The town takes its name from the River Otter on which it stands, the river taking its name from the animal. The 'St Mary' element refers to the fact that the town belonged to the church of St Mary in Rouen in 1086.

River Otter, Devon river in Somerset and Devon, England

The River Otter rises in the Blackdown Hills just inside the county of Somerset, England near Otterford, then flows south for some 32 km through East Devon to the English Channel at the western end of Lyme Bay, part of the Jurassic Coast, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Permian and Triassic sandstone aquifer in the Otter Valley is one of Devon's largest groundwater sources, supplying drinking water to 200,000 people.

Cadhay

Cadhay is an historic estate situated in the parish of Ottery St Mary in Devon, England, 10 miles east of Exeter and 5 miles from the sea at Sidmouth. The mansion house known as Cadhay House, situated one mile north-west of Ottery St Mary village, is a grade I listed Elizabethan building.

Contents

The area of Thorne Farm is low lying and suffered serious flooding in 2008 which caused the Environment Agency to propose improvements including diverting the Thorne Farm Stream via a channel to the River Otter flood plain. [3]

Descent

at-Thorne

Arms of Thorne: Argent, a fess gules between three lions rampant sable ThorneArms.png
Arms of Thorne: Argent, a fess gules between three lions rampant sable

Thorne was the seat of the "at-Thorne" [5] (later Thorne) family, which as was usual[ citation needed ] had taken their surname from their seat. Some confusion exists concerning two Devonshire families, one named by Pole (d.1635) and Risdon (d.1640) as "at-Thorne" seated at "Thorne" [6] in the parish of Ottery St Mary, and another named by both as "de Thorn / Thorn" of "Thorn", [7] (listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 [8] ) in the parish of Holsworthy, both of which families apparently bore the same arms [9] and both of whose names are also sometimes referred to as "Thorne". The last in the male line was Roger at-Thorne, whose heiress was his sister Jone at-Thorne, the wife of Henry Cooke, to whose posterity descended the estate of Thorne.

William Pole (antiquary) English politician and antiquarian

Sir William Pole (1561–1635) of Colcombe House in the parish of Colyton, of Southcote in the parish of Talaton and formerly of Shute House in the parish of Shute, both in Devon, was an English country gentleman and landowner, a colonial investor, Member of Parliament and, most notably, a historian and antiquarian of the County of Devon.

Tristram Risdon Antiquarian, topographer

Tristram Risdon was an English antiquarian and topographer, and the author of Survey of the County of Devon. He was able to devote most of his life to writing this work. After he completed it in about 1632 it circulated around interested people in several manuscript copies for almost 80 years before it was first published by Curll in a very inferior form. A full version was not published until 1811. Risdon also collected information about genealogy and heraldry in a note-book; this was edited and published in 1897.

Cooke

Arms of Cooke: Ermine, on a bend cotised gules three cats-a-mountain passant guardant or Cooke (OfThorne Devon) Arms.png
Arms of Cooke: Ermine, on a bend cotised gules three cats-a-mountain passant guardant or
Mural monument in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary, to John Cooke (d. 1632) of Thorne. He stands dressed in armour, his helmet resting on the ground, and holds in his left hand the handle of his sheathed sword and in his right hand the baton of a military commander. On the wall of the aedicule behind on either side of his head are shown the arms of Cooke (left) and of Sherman (right). On top is a shield showing Cooke of 9 quarters, the first quarter being Thorne of Thorne Memorial to John Coke of Thorne Esq in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary.JPG
Mural monument in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary, to John Cooke (d. 1632) of Thorne. He stands dressed in armour, his helmet resting on the ground, and holds in his left hand the handle of his sheathed sword and in his right hand the baton of a military commander. On the wall of the aedicule behind on either side of his head are shown the arms of Cooke (left) and of Sherman (right). On top is a shield showing Cooke of 9 quarters, the first quarter being Thorne of Thorne

Henry Cooke married Jone Thorne, heiress of Thorne, and his descendants remained seated at Thorne until the time of Pole (d.1635). The arms of Thorne (Argent, a fess gules between three lions rampant sable) appear as the second of the nine quarters on an escutcheon on top of the mural monument to John Cooke (d. 1632) of Thorne in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary. The Cooke family subsequently married various further heiresses, one of whom was Mary Keloway, one of the daughters and co-heiresses of John Keloway (alias Kelloway, etc.) of Cullompton, [11] Devon, a widespread and prominent Devonshire family the senior line of which was seated at Stafford, Dolton. The arms of Kelloway (Argent, two grozing irons in saltire sable between four Kelway pears proper a bordure engrailed of the second) appear as the fourth of nine the quarters on an escutcheon on the mural monument to John Cooke (d. 1632) of Thorne in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary. Mary Kelloway's mother was Jane Tregarthyn, a daughter and heiress of Tredruffe Tregarthyn of Bremwell in Cornwall. The arms of Mary Kelloway's parents appear on the monument [12] in Branscombe Church, Devon, to Joan Tregarthin (d.1583) widow successively of John Kelloway of Cullompton, and of John Wadham (d.1578) of Merifield, Ilton, Somerset and of Edge, Branscombe.

Quartering (heraldry) method of joining several different coats of arms together

Quartering in is a method of joining several different coats of arms together in one shield by dividing the shield into equal parts and placing different coats of arms in each division.

Escutcheon (heraldry) main or focal element in an achievement of arms

In heraldry, an escutcheon is a shield that forms the main or focal element in an achievement of arms. The word is used in two related senses.

Stafford, Dolton historic manor in the parish of Dolton in Devon, England

Stafford is an historic manor in the parish of Dolton in Devon, England. The present manor house known as Stafford Barton is a grade II* listed building. A house of some form has existed on the manor probably since the Norman Conquest in the 11th century. Surviving walls can be dated to the 16th century. Many additions and renovations have taken place in the intervening years, and in the early 20th century Charles Luxmoore made many alterations and extensions and imported several major architectural features from ancient local mansions undergoing demolition so that "it has become somewhat difficult to discern its original form". In the nineteenth century the estate was very substantial, with 400 acres of associated farmland and a large staff, and by 1956, at the end of the Luxmoore tenure, it had grown to 1,460 acres with 7 farms, several cottages and smallholdings.

The great-grandson of William Cooke and Mary Kelloway was John Cooke (d.1632) of Thorne, [13] whose mural monument with effigy survives in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary. He married Margaret Sherman, a daughter of Richard Sherman of Ottery St Mary, whose arms (Or, a lion rampant sable between three holly leaves vert) [14] appear on the monument. He is said by Stabb [15] to have been murdered by a younger brother, and "the story goes that at midnight the statue steps down from its niche and walks about the church". The monument was restored by his grandson in 1726.

St Marys Church, Ottery St Mary Church in Ottery St Mary, England

St Mary’s Church is a Grade I listed parish church in the Church of England in Ottery St Mary, Devon.

John Stabb (1865–1917) of Torquay, Devon, England, was an ecclesiologist and antiquary of the county of Devon. He is best known for his three-volume publication Some Old Devon Churches, their Rood Screens, Pulpits, Fonts, etc., which he illustrated with several hundred of his own photographs.

The second son and eventual heir (his elder brother Richard Cooke having died without progeny) of John Cooke (d. 1632) was William Cooke, who in October 1639 brought a lawsuit before the judge Henry Howard, Lord Maltravers, against John Bagg of Ottery St Mary, a miller, for having insulted him in a manner likely to provoke a duel. The case is recorded as follows: [16]

Henry Howard, 22nd Earl of Arundel English politician

Henry Frederick Howard, 22nd Earl of Arundel PC, styled Lord Maltravers until 1640, and Baron Mowbray from 1640 until 1652, was an English nobleman, chiefly remembered for his role in the development of the rule against perpetuities.

"About the 25th day of June last, your petitioner being at Awtry, in the county aforesaid, in the company of divers gent(lemen) and others at a publique meeting, was there assaulted by one John Bagg of Awtry, yeoman, who (without any provocation given him) told your petitioner that "he was a base knave and a base gent"; and being reproved for such his speeches by some gent(lemen) then present Bagg replyed that "he could not make your petitioner baser then he was".

Cooke stated that he was a captain of a trained band and that his family had been gentry for 300 years, whereas Bagg was merely a yeoman. No further proceedings survive.

Further reading

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References

  1. Pole, p.149
  2. See map
  3. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-15853163
  4. Pole, p.504; Vivian, p.727. These arms appear as the second of the nine quarters on an escutcheon on top of the mural monument to John Cooke (d. 1632) of Thorne in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary
  5. Risdon, Tristram (d.1640), Survey of Devon, 1811 edition, London, 1811, with 1810 Additions; Pole, p.149
  6. Pole, p.149
  7. Pole, p.360; Risdon, p.233
  8. Thorn, Caroline & Frank, (eds.) Domesday Book, (Morris, John, gen.ed.) Vol. 9, Devon, Parts 1 & 2, Phillimore Press, Chichester, 1985, Part 2 (Notes), 3:88
  9. Pole, p.504; Vivian, p.727, pedigree of "Thorne of Thorne", being the pedigree of the Thorn family of Thorn, Holsworthy; these arms Argent, a fess gules between three lions rampant sable appear as the second of the nine quarters on an escutcheon on top of the mural monument to John Cooke (d. 1632) of Thorne in St Mary's Church, Ottery St Mary
  10. Vivian, p.222
  11. Pole, p.149
  12. See image: File:JoanTregarthinMonument BranscombeChurch Devon.PNG
  13. Vivian, p.222
  14. Vivian, p.680
  15. Stabb, John, Some Old Devon Churches, Their Rood Screens, Pulpits, Fonts, Etc., 3 Vols., London: Vol 1, 1908, Vol.2, 1911; Vol.3, 1916
  16. Petition: 6/102 (no date) Libel: 17/5i (12 Oct 1639) (Court unknown), quoted in: