Thorne (surname)

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Thorne is a surname of English origin, originally referring to a thorn bush. Thorne is the 1,721st most common surname name in the United States. Thorne family's origins date back to the period prior to the Norman Conquest of 1066, to the county of Somerset. Thorne is an English name, now found mostly in the area of Dorset and Devon, bordering counties located on the southwestern coast of England. The knighthood was bestowed on William Thorne by King Richard the Lion Hearted for heroism during the 3rd crusade approximately 1199. The Thorne motto "Vincere vel Mori" translates to "Conquer or die".

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Thorne may refer to:

Real people

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