Thornton (surname)

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Thornton is a surname found in Ireland and Britain.

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Overview

Found in Britain as an English and Scottish surname derived from places so named in Buckinghamshire, Cheshire, Fife, Merseyside, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, London, Pembrokeshire, Yorkshire. Its basic form denotes a settlement ('tun') of some sort beside a thorn tree or hedge of thorns .

In Ireland, it is an Anglicised form of a number of Gaelic-Irish surnames which have nothing to do with the British placenames. "[Thornton] is a portmanteau English name for Ó Droighneáin, Mac Sceacháin, Ó Toráin. The connection is: draighean, blackthorn; sceach, whitethorn; tor, a bush. MacLysaght remarks that some Thorntons in Limerick were 16 cent planters." . Ó Droighneáin remains in use as an Irish-language surname.

A portmanteau or portmanteau word is a linguistic blend of words, in which parts of multiple words or their phones (sounds) are combined into a new word, as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog, or motel, from motor and hotel. In linguistics, a portmanteau is defined as a single morph that represents two or more morphemes.

Ó Droighneáin, Gaelic-Irish surname.

Edward MacLysaght Irish genealogist

Edward MacLysaght was one of the foremost genealogists of twentieth century Ireland. His numerous books on Irish surnames built upon the work of Rev. Patrick Woulfe's Irish Names and Surnames (1923) and made him well known to all those researching their family past.

Bearers of the surname

Al Thornton American basketball player

Willie Alford Thornton is an American professional basketball player for the Club Atlético Aguada. He had formerly played for the Los Angeles Clippers, Washington Wizards and the Golden State Warriors. Collegiately, he played for Florida State University.

Alfred Thornton English footballer and banker

Alfred Horace Thornton was an English amateur footballer who played for England in the first representative international match against Scotland in 1870. By profession, he was a banker.

Alice Thornton British autobiographer during civil war

Alice Thornton was a British writer during the English civil war. Her books were published in part in 1875.

Fictional characters

First name

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