Thorpe Hazell

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Thorpe Hazell is a fictional detective created by the British author Victor Lorenzo Whitechurch. Hazell was a railway expert and a vegetarian, whom the author intended to be as far from Sherlock Holmes as possible. Short stories about Thorpe Hazell appeared in the Strand Magazine, the Royal Magazine, Railway Magazine, [1] Pearson's and Harmsworth's Magazines. They were collected in Thrilling Stories of the Railway (1912).

Radio adaptation

Five stories were adapted for radio read by Benedict Cumberbatch on BBC Radio 7 [2]

No.Original airdateTitle
18 December 2008The Affair of the German Dispatch-Box
2.9 December 2008Sir Gilbert Murrell's Picture
3.10 December 2008The Affair of the Corridor Express
4.11 December 2008The Stolen Necklace
5.12 December 2008The Affair of the Birmingham Bank

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