Three Men, a Woman and a Baby

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"Three Men, a Woman and a Baby"
Only Fools and Horses episode
Episode no.Series 7
Episode 6
Directed byTony Dow
Written by John Sullivan
Produced byGareth Gwenlan
Original air date3 February 1991
(18.9 million viewers)
Running time50 minutes
  • 49:08 (DVD)
  • 49:09 (iTunes)
List of Only Fools and Horses episodes

"Three Men, a Woman and a Baby" is an episode of the BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses . It was the final episode of series 7, and was first broadcast on 3 February 1991. This is the last episode of the last regular series, although Christmas specials were broadcast intermittently until 2003. In this episode, the birth of Del and Raquel's baby is imminent. Damien Trotter appears in the show for the first time in the episode's finale.

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House in Westminster, London, and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees. It employs over 20,950 staff in total, 16,672 of whom are in public sector broadcasting. The total number of staff is 35,402 when part-time, flexible, and fixed-contract staff are included.

A sitcom, clipping for situational comedy, is a genre of comedy centered on a fixed set of characters who carry over from episode to episode. Sitcoms can be contrasted with sketch comedy, where a troupe may use new characters in each sketch, and stand-up comedy, where a comedian tells jokes and stories to an audience. Sitcoms originated in radio, but today are found mostly on television as one of its dominant narrative forms. This form can also include mockumentaries.

<i>Only Fools and Horses</i> British television sitcom

Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom created and written by John Sullivan. Seven series were originally broadcast on BBC One in the United Kingdom from 1981 to 1991, with sixteen sporadic Christmas specials aired until the end of the show in 2003. Episodes are regularly repeated on UKTV comedy channel Gold and occasionally repeated on Yesterday.

Contents

Synopsis

Rodney enters the lounge with another hangover, and Albert tells him that Raquel is in the late stages of pregnancy, and Del Boy will soon become a father. As Rodney and Albert talk about the baby being either a boy or a girl, Raquel enters, soon followed by Del, who is carrying a large cardboard box with its printing on the side reading "Crowning Glory, wigs of distinction", which he acquired from Mustapha from the Bangladeshi butcher's shop. Del then reminds Rodney that he's taking Cassandra to Hampton Court that afternoon.

Rodney Trotter

Rodney Charlton "Rodders" Trotter is a fictional character in the long running BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses, played by Nicholas Lyndhurst / Ryan Hutton. He was named after Rod Taylor and Charlton Athletic.

Albert Gladstone Trotter, better known as Uncle Albert, was a fictional character in the BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses. He was introduced during the fourth series as a replacement for the character of Grandad due to the sudden death of Lennard Pearce in 1984. He was portrayed by Buster Merryfield.

Rachel "Raquel" Turner is a fictional character from the BBC television sit-com Only Fools and Horses, in which she was Del Boy's longtime girlfriend. She was portrayed by Tessa Peake-Jones.

Later that day, at the Nag's Head, there is a contest to guess what the name of Del and Raquel's baby will be. Del and Albert enter with plenty of wigs to flog, and Rodney tells them that his day out with Cassandra did not go well, because they argued about which way to go in a garden maze.

Back at the flat, Del is seething, because the wigs he bought from Mustapha are men's wigs. One week later, as Rodney and Albert watch an ecological disaster documentary, Del and Raquel return from having attended an antenatal class about the importance of pregnancy. Later that evening, Del tells Rodney that earlier today, he bumped into Stephen, Cassandra's former boss at the bank, and the same person who Rodney hit on the nose back in "The Jolly Boys' Outing". Del saw Stephen wearing a clip-on ponytail. Raquel enters carrying a baby's name book. The Trotters suggest plenty of names, until Rodney snidely suggests naming the baby Damien. To his horror, Del and Raquel love the name. Rodney desperately tries to get them to change their mind and name the baby Derek, leading to their baby's full name: Damien Derek Trotter. Uncle Albert points out that would make his initials DDT, but Del and Raquel are unconcerned, with Del remarking that "there'll be no flies on him." Just then, Rodney gets a phone call from Cassandra.

The Jolly Boys Outing An episode of Only Fools and Horses

"The Jolly Boys' Outing" is the eighth Christmas special episode of the BBC sit-com Only Fools and Horses, first screened on 25 December 1989. Despite being aired as a Christmas special, it is set on an August bank holiday weekend, and sees Del and the gang go on a coach trip to Margate.

Damien Thorn antagonist of The Omen series

Damien Thorn is a fictional character and the primary antagonist of The Omen series. He is the Antichrist and the son of the Devil. The character has been portrayed by Harvey Spencer Stephens, Jonathan Scott-Taylor, Sam Neill, Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick and Bradley James.

DDT Organochloride known for its insecticidal properties

Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, commonly known as DDT, is a colorless, tasteless, and almost odorless crystalline chemical compound, an organochlorine, originally developed as an insecticide, and ultimately becoming infamous for its environmental impacts. It was first synthesized in 1874 by the Austrian chemist Othmar Zeidler. DDT's insecticidal action was discovered by the Swiss chemist Paul Hermann Müller in 1939. DDT was used in the second half of World War II to control malaria and typhus among civilians and troops. Müller was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for his discovery of the high efficiency of DDT as a contact poison against several arthropods" in 1948.

Rodney (secretly sporting one of the clip-on ponytails) heads over to his and Cassandra's flat to see his wife, and Cassandra tells her husband that clip-on ponytails aren't very cool. Upon hearing this, Rodney removes his ponytail. Then, Cassandra says that she spoke to her solicitor, who suggested that she and Rodney try and repair their marriage by raising a pet. Rodney doesn't want to raise a dog, since he got bit by a Jack Russell as a child. Cassandra does not want to raise a cat, because she is allergic to fur. As Rodney prepares to leave in a huff, Cassandra screams upon seeing the discarded clip-on ponytail, thinking that it's a rat. Rodney seizes the opportunity to "save the day" and eventually gets rid of the thing, winning back Cassandra's heart.

Meanwhile, back at Nelson Mandela House, Del discovers that the men's wigs are falling apart, and Raquel goes right into labour. Cassandra and Rodney are informed, and Rodney heads off to the hospital.

At the hospital, Del and Raquel wait in the delivery room, while Rodney and Albert wait in the corridor. A group of hospital staff enter the delivery room, and they and Del help Raquel finally give birth to a boy. Albert and Rodney enter the delivery room to meet Del and Raquel's newborn son, Damien Derek Trotter. Rodney reacts horrified as Damien looks at him (as O Fortuna plays in the background). Del then takes his son, goes to a window, and looks outside into the night sky. Del tells the spirit of his late mother Joan about her first grandchild, and tells Damien that he has a loving family, and that this time next year, they will be millionaires. After the credits, there is a group shot of Del Boy, Rodney, Raquel, Albert, and Damien.

Damien Derek Trotter is a fictional character in the BBC series Only Fools and Horses. He is son to Derek Trotter and Raquel Turner.

O Fortuna Medieval Latin poem

"O Fortuna" is a medieval Latin Goliardic poem written early in the 13th century, part of the collection known as the Carmina Burana. It is a complaint about Fortuna, the inexorable fate that rules both gods and mortals in Roman and Greek mythology.

First appearances

Music

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Hothouse Flowers are an Irish rock group that combines traditional Irish music with influences from soul, gospel, and rock. Formed in 1985 in Dublin, they started as street performers. Their first album, People (1988), was the most successful debut album in Irish history, reaching No. 1 in Ireland and No. 2 in the UK. After two more albums and extensive touring, the group separated in 1994. Since getting back together in 1998, the band members have been sporadically issuing new songs and touring, but also pursuing solo careers.

Dusty Springfield 20th-century English singer and record producer

Mary Isobel Catherine Bernadette O'Brien, professionally known as Dusty Springfield, was an English pop singer and record producer whose career extended from the late 1950s to the 1990s. With her distinctive sensual mezzo-soprano sound, she was an important singer of blue-eyed soul and at her peak was one of the most successful British female performers, with six top 20 singles on the US Billboard Hot 100 and sixteen on the UK Singles Chart from 1963 to 1989. She is a member of the Rock and Roll and UK Music Halls of Fame. International polls have named Springfield among the best female rock artists of all time. Her image, supported by a peroxide blonde bouffant hairstyle, evening gowns, and heavy make-up, as well as her flamboyant performances made her an icon of the Swinging Sixties.

Roxy Music English art rock band formed in 1971

Roxy Music is an English rock band formed in 1970 by Bryan Ferry, who became the band's lead vocalist and chief songwriter, and bassist Graham Simpson. Alongside Ferry, the other longtime members were Phil Manzanera (guitar), Andy Mackay and Paul Thompson. Other members included Brian Eno, Eddie Jobson, and John Gustafson (bass). Although the band took a break from group activities in 1976 and again in 1983, they reunited for a concert tour in 2001, and toured together intermittently between that time and their break-up in 2011. Ferry frequently enlisted members of Roxy Music as session musicians for his solo releases.

Note: In the VHS/DVD versions, Carl Orff's "O Fortuna" is replaced by a similar-sounding piece of music.

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Derek Edward Trotter, more commonly known as Del Boy, is the fictional lead character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses and one of the main characters of its prequel, Rock & Chips. He was played by David Jason in the original series and was portrayed as a teenager by James Buckley in the prequel. Del Boy is often regarded as one of the greatest comedy characters in the history of British television, and is regarded as an iconic character in British culture. In a 2001 poll conducted by Channel 4 Del Boy was ranked fourth on their list of the 100 Greatest TV Characters.

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