Three for Breakfast

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Three for Breakfast
Three For Breakfast.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Jack Hannah
Story byNick George
Produced by Walt Disney
Starring Clarence Nash
James MacDonald
Dessie Flynn
Music by Oliver Wallace
Animation byBob Carlson
Volus Jones
Bill Justice
Dan MacManus
Layouts by Yale Gracey
Backgrounds byThelma Witmer
Color process Technicolor
Production
company
Distributed by RKO Radio Pictures
Release date
  • November 5, 1948 (1948-11-05)
(USA)
Running time
7 minutes, 4 seconds [1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Three for Breakfast is a 1948 American animated short film directed by Jack Hannah. Part of the Donald Duck film series, the film was produced in Technicolor by Walt Disney Productions and released to theaters by RKO Radio Pictures on November 5, 1948. [2]

Contents

The cartoon stars Donald Duck cooking himself a pancake breakfast at home. Donald is confounded by two chipmunks living in his stovepipe, Chip and Dale, who eventually succeed in stealing Donald's pancakes. Clarence Nash stars as Donald while James MacDonald and Dessie Flynn voice Chip and Dale, respectively. The film includes original music by Oliver Wallace.

Plot

Donald Duck is cooking pancakes in his kitchen, singing "Shortnin' Bread", when two chipmunks, Chip 'n' Dale, get wind of the smell wafting through their home in the stovepipe while eating acorns. Once inside, they steal a few of Donald's pancakes by throwing a fork tied to a piece of string, but Donald soon discovers the chipmunks, and puts down a pot holder on his stack of pancakes for them to catch, but the chipmunks throw it back. They throw the fork again, but it misses the pancakes and it hits a bottle of rubber cement, causing it to spill. It forms into a fake pancake, giving Donald an idea. He puts down the "pancake" and when the chipmunks catch it, Donald grabs onto it. He then lets go of it while the chipmunks are pulling it. The chipmunks try taking a bite out of it and get into a tug of war with it, until Donald puts down a fork which pokes Chip while he is walking backwards, causing him to yelp in pain and let go of the "pancake". It hits the wall and springs back, hitting Donald in the face. Donald furiously chases the chipmunks and they hide in the toaster. But Donald pulls down the lever and waits. The chipmunks pop out and Donald catches them, but Dale bites his finger, causing him to shout in pain and let the chipmunks go. They then catch the pancakes with the string and bring them up to the roof, but Donald grabs the rubber cement pancake and tugs on it, tying up his entire house in the process. He climbs up to the roof, but Dale applies butter to the roof and has Donald lift his foot as he puts butter under it, causing Donald to slide down. He is then sent on a wild ride and unties the house. The cartoon ends with Donald jammed in the stovepipe, grimacing in an Asian stereotype and Dale imitating him as the chipmunks celebrate their victory.

Voice cast

Releases

Home media

The short was released on December 11, 2007, on Walt Disney Treasures: The Chronological Donald, Volume Three: 1947-1950 . [3]

Additional releases include:

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References

  1. "Three for Breakfast". disneyshorts.org.
  2. Lenburg, Jeff (1999). The Encyclopedia of Animated Cartoons. Checkmark Books. pp. 74–76. ISBN   0-8160-3831-7 . Retrieved 6 June 2020.
  3. "The Chronological Donald Volume 3 DVD Review". DVD Dizzy. Retrieved 13 February 2021.