Thue (food)

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Thue is a delicacy in Tibetan cuisine made with dri cheese (or sometimes parmesan or other hard cheeses), brown sugar (usually porang) and unsalted sweet cream butter. These ingredients are mixed together by hand into a smooth, slightly crumbly doughy mixture. It has a high butter content and is shaped in a thuedrom, a rectangular wooden frame about the size of a small brick. Thue is often topped with representations of the moon and the sun, carved out of butter while it is in a cold state. It is one of the few sweet Tibetan dishes and is eaten as a dessert on Losar and other special occasions like the Sho Dun Festival or on weddings. [1]

Tibetan cuisine cusine connected to Tibet

Tibetan cuisine includes the culinary traditions and practices and its peoples. The cuisine reflects the Tibetan landscape of mountains and plateaus and includes influences from neighbours. It is known for its use of noodles, goat, yak, mutton, dumplings, cheese, butter, yoghurt and soups. Vegetarianism has been debated by religious practitioners since the 11th century, but is not prevalent due to the difficulty of growing vegetables, and cultural traditions promoting consumption of meat.

Butter dairy product

Butter is a dairy product with high butterfat content which is solid when chilled and at room temperature in some regions, and liquid when warmed. It is made by churning fresh or fermented cream or milk to separate the butterfat from the buttermilk. It is generally used as a spread on plain or toasted bread products and a condiment on cooked vegetables, as well as in cooking, such as baking, sauce making, and pan frying. Butter consists of butterfat, milk proteins and water, and often added salt.

Losar is a festival in Tibetan Buddhism. The holiday is celebrated on various dates depending on location tradition. The holiday is a new year's festival, celebrated on the first day of the lunisolar Tibetan calendar, which corresponds to a date in February or March in the Gregorian calendar. In 2018, the new year commenced on the 16th of February and celebrations will run until the 18th of the same month. It also commenced the Year of the Male Earth Dog.

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References

  1. Thue, An; Original, Tibetan; Treat. "Thue: An Original Tibetan Treat".