Thunderbolt (Marvel Comics)

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Thunderbolt is the name of two fictional characters appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

An American comic book is a thin periodical, typically 32 pages, containing comics content. While the form originated in 1933, American comic books first gained popularity after the 1938 publication of Action Comics, which included the debut of the superhero Superman. This was followed by a superhero boom that lasted until the end of World War II. After the war, while superheroes were marginalized, the comic book industry rapidly expanded, and genres such as horror, crime, science fiction, and romance became popular. The 1950s saw a gradual decline, due to a shift away from print media in the wake of television and the impact of the Comics Code Authority. The late 1950s and the 1960s saw a superhero revival, and superheroes remain the dominant character archetype in the 21st century.

Marvel Comics company that publishes comic books and related media

Marvel Comics is the brand name and primary imprint of Marvel Worldwide Inc., formerly Marvel Publishing, Inc. and Marvel Comics Group, a publisher of American comic books and related media. In 2009, The Walt Disney Company acquired Marvel Entertainment, Marvel Worldwide's parent company.

Contents

Publication history

The William Carver version of Thunderbolt first appeared in Daredevil #69 and was created by Roy Thomas, Gene Colan, and Syd Shores.

<i>Daredevil</i> (Marvel Comics series) comic book series

Daredevil is the name of several comic book titles featuring the character Daredevil and published by Marvel Comics, beginning with the original Daredevil comic book series which debuted in 1964.

Roy Thomas Comic writer

Roy William Thomas Jr. is an American comic book writer and editor, who was Stan Lee's first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. He is possibly best known for introducing the pulp magazine hero Conan the Barbarian to American comics, with a series that added to the storyline of Robert E. Howard's character and helped launch a sword and sorcery trend in comics. Thomas is also known for his championing of Golden Age comic-book heroes – particularly the 1940s superhero team the Justice Society of America – and for lengthy writing stints on Marvel's X-Men and The Avengers, and DC Comics' All-Star Squadron, among other titles.

Gene Colan American comics creator and artist

Eugene Jules "Gene" Colan was an American comic book artist best known for his work for Marvel Comics, where his signature titles include the superhero series Daredevil, the cult-hit satiric series Howard the Duck, and The Tomb of Dracula, considered one of comics' classic horror series. He co-created the Falcon, the first African-American superhero in mainstream comics, Carol Danvers, who would become Ms. Marvel and Captain Marvel, and would appear the Marvel Cinematic Universe film Captain Marvel starring Brie Larson, and the non-costumed, supernatural vampire hunter Blade, who went on to appear in a series of films starring Wesley Snipes.

The Luis Barrett version of Thunderbolt first appeared in Incredible Hulk Annual #17 and was created by Gary Barnum, John Stanisci, and Tim Dzon.

<i>The Incredible Hulk</i> (comic book) comic book

The Incredible Hulk is an ongoing comic book series featuring the Marvel Comics superhero the Hulk and his alter ego Dr. Bruce Banner. First published in May 1962, the series ran for six issues before it was cancelled in March 1963, and the Hulk character began appearing in Tales to Astonish. With issue #102, Tales to Astonish was renamed to The Incredible Hulk in April 1968, becoming its second volume. The series continued to run until issue #474 in March 1999 when it was replaced with the series Hulk which ran until February 2000 and was retitled to The Incredible Hulk's third volume, running until March 2007 when it became The Incredible Hercules with a new title character. The Incredible Hulk returned in September 2009 beginning at issue #600, which became The Incredible Hulks in November 2010 and focused on the Hulk and the modern incarnation of his expanded family. The series returned to The Incredible Hulk in December 2011 and ran until January 2013, when it was replaced with The Indestructible Hulk as part of Marvel's Marvel NOW! relaunch.

Fictional character biography

William Carver

Thunderbolt I
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Daredevil #69 (Oct 1970)
(as Thunderbolt): Power Man #41
Created by Roy Thomas
Gene Colan
Syd Shores
In-story information
Alter egoWilliam Carver
Species Human
AbilitiesSuperhuman speed and reflexes

William Carver was born in Harlem, New York. Returning to Harlem after military service, William was approached by several members of a local violent street gang named the Thunderbolts which Turk Barrett was a part of. The Thunderbolts are eager to have William in their group for his military training. Carver refused and the next day went to work as an assistant district attorney under then-District Attorney Franklin Nelson. When Nelson learned of Carver's encounter with the Thunderbolts gang, he instructed Carver to infiltrate them to gather enough information about their illegal activities to shut them down. Carver helped gather enough evidence to send several members to prison. [1]

Harlem Neighborhood of Manhattan in New York, New York, United States

Harlem is a large neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan. Since the 1920s, Harlem has been known as a major African American residential, cultural and business center. Originally a Dutch village, formally organized in 1658, it is named after the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands. Harlem's history has been defined by a series of economic boom-and-bust cycles, with significant population shifts accompanying each cycle.

Turk Barrett is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character is usually depicted in stories featuring Daredevil, in which his inept schemes are played as comic relief.

Foggy Nelson fictional character in the Marvel Comics Universe

Franklin Percy "Foggy" Nelson is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character has been depicted as part of the supporting cast of Daredevil ; Foggy is Matt's best friend and, for most of the series, his law partner. The character was created by Stan Lee and Bill Everett.

Months later, William's younger brother Lonnie Carver was gunned down in front of him. At the funeral, William spotted Lonnie's murderer and chased him through the cemetery. As the two men struggled, a bolt of lightning hit them, killing the sniper instantly. Carver was saved by an experimental cobalt radiation treatment during which he was unintentionally exposed to an unusual amount of radiation. The radiation mutated his body to give him the ability to move at superhuman speeds and enhanced his reflexes. Carver began a career as a costumed crime-fighter calling himself Thunderbolt after his first criminal enemies and tried to discover who had ordered Lonnie's assassination. [2]

Carver soon discovered that the radiation he was exposed to sped up not only his reflexes, but his aging as he was now aging at a rate of several years per week. Carver tracked down his old ally Power Man and Power Man's ally Iron Fist to help him find Lonnie's killer. They discovered that it had been attorney Big Ben Donovan whose younger brother Paul had been one of the Thunderbolts gang members that William Carver sent to prison. Paul Donovan was killed in prison by some Maggia operatives and Big Ben Donovan blamed Carver for his death sending an assassin to kill William's brother Lonnie in revenge. After his confession, Big Ben Donovan pulled a gun on Thunderbolt during the fight with Caesar Cicero's men. As the two men struggled, the gun went off and accidentally shot Donovan. Thunderbolt's mission completed, he succumbed to his body's rapid aging and died, content that his brother's murder had been avenged. [3]

Luke Cage comic book character

Luke Cage is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Luke Cage first appeared in Luke Cage, Hero for Hire #1 and was created by Archie Goodwin, George Tuska, Roy Thomas, and John Romita Sr.. He was the first black superhero to be featured as the protagonist and title character of a comic book.

Iron Fist (comics) comic book character

Iron Fist is a fictional superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by Roy Thomas and Gil Kane, Iron Fist first appeared in Marvel Premiere #15. The character is a practitioner of martial arts and the wielder of a mystical force known as the Iron Fist, which allows him to summon and focus his chi. He starred in his own solo series in the 1970s, and shared the title Power Man and Iron Fist for several years with Luke Cage, partnering with Cage to form the superhero team Heroes for Hire. The character has starred in numerous solo titles since, including The Immortal Iron Fist, which expanded on his origin story and the history of the Iron Fist.

Big Ben Donovan is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics.

Luis Barrett

Thunderbolt II
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Incredible Hulk Annual #17 (1991)
Created by Gary Barnum
John Stanisci
Tim Dzon
In-story information
Alter egoLuis Barrett
Species Human
Team affiliations Pantheon
AbilitiesSuperhuman speed

Luis Barrett had somehow obtained superhuman speed while in high school. He came from a poor family and knew that he would not obtain a scholarship after he graduated. Justin Hammer later learned of Luis' powers and sent Barrier, Blacklash, and Ringer II to bring Luis to him. Using his business connections, Justin Hammer obtained William Carver's Thunderbolt costume. Then he gave the costume to Luis Barrett so that he can convince him to join Hammer's criminal enterprises in exchange for funding his college scholarship. When members of the Pantheon warned Luis of Hammer's intentions, Luis turned against Justin Hammer's villain allies during a plot to steal an experimental plane from Air Force One base. Ringer bound Thunderbolt's legs during the fight. Before Blacklash could attack Thunderbolt, he managed to take out Blacklash despite the fact that his legs were bound. Although Luis was left with no other means of going to college, Ulysses noted that Luis is now on the right track. [4]

Luis was considered as a "potential recruit" for the Initiative program. [5]

Powers and abilities

The William Carver version of Thunderbolt had superhuman speed and quick reflexes. The visor of his costume can produce an intense blinding light which he would use as a last resort.

The Luis Barrett version of Thunderbolt has superhuman speed.

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References

  1. Daredevil #69
  2. Power Man #42
  3. Power Man and Iron Fist #62
  4. Incredible Hulk Annual #17
  5. Civil War: Battle Damage Report #1