Thuringite

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Thuringite is a variety of the chlorite mineral chamosite, a hydrous iron and aluminium silicate mineral. It is usually found as small green scales deposited on other minerals, particularly to which it is closely related.

Chlorite group triclinic, monoclinic and orthorhombic phyllosilicates

The chlorites are a group of phyllosilicate minerals. Chlorites can be described by the following four endmembers based on their chemistry via substitution of the following four elements in the silicate lattice; Mg, Fe, Ni, and Mn.

Chamosite phyllosilicate mineral

Chamosite is the Fe2+end member of the chlorite group. A hydrous aluminium silicate of iron, which is produced in an environment of low to moderate grade of metamorphosed iron deposits, as gray or black crystals in oolitic iron ore. Like other chlorites, it is a product of the hydrothermal alteration of pyroxenes, amphiboles and biotite in igneous rock. The composition of chlorite is often related to that of the original igneous mineral so that more Fe-rich chlorites are commonly found as replacements of the Fe-rich ferromagnesian minerals (Deer et al., 1992).

It is named after the German state of Thuringia. [1]

Thuringia State in Germany

Thuringia, officially the Free State of Thuringia, is a state of Germany.

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Illite degradation product of muscovite to montmorillonite

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Scorodite arsenate mineral

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Brownleeite is a silicide mineral with chemical formula MnSi. It was discovered by researchers of the Johnson Space Center in Houston while analyzing the Pi Puppid particle shower of the comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup. The only other known natural manganese silicide is mavlyanovite, Mn5Si3.

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Scawt Hill volcanic plug, Northern Ireland

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Grossmanite is a very rare mineral of the pyroxene group, with formula CaTi3+AlSiO6. It is the titanium-dominant member. Grossmanite is unique in being a mineral with trivalent titanium, a feature shared with tistarite, Ti2O3. Titanium in minerals is almost exclusively tetravalent. Grossmanite stands for titanium-analogue of davisite, esseneite and kushiroite - other members of the pyroxene group. Both grossmanite and tistarite come from the famous Allende meteorite.

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