Tickle (surname)

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Tickle is an English toponymic surname, derived from Tickhill in Yorkshire. Notable people with the surname include:

Tickhill a town in Tickhill, United Kindom

Tickhill is a town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, on the border with Nottinghamshire. It has a population of 5,301, reducing to 5,228 at the 2011 Census.

Charles Henry Tickle was an English professional footballer who played in the Football League for Birmingham.

Cheryll Anne Tickle, CBE FRS FRSE FMedSci, is a distinguished British scientist, known for her work in developmental biology and specifically for her research into the process by which vertebrate limbs develop ab ovo. She is an Emeritus Professor at the University of Bath.

Danny Tickle British rugby league player

Danny Tickle is an English professional rugby league footballer who plays in the second-row for Workington Town in Betfred League 1, Tickle is also a noted goal-kicker.

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Clark Surname list

Clark is an English language surname, ultimately derived from the Latin clericus meaning "scribe", "secretary" or a scholar within a religious order, referring to someone who was educated. Clark evolved from "clerk". First records of the name are found in 12th-century England. The name has many variants.

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Little Surname list

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