Tickner

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Tickner is a topographic surname of English origin for someone who lived at a crossroad or a fork in the road. [1] Notable people with the surname include:

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Ticknor, a variant spelling of Tickner, is a topographic surname of English origin for someone who lived at a crossroad or a fork in the road. Notable people with the surname include:

References

  1. Hanks, Patrick, ed. (2003). Dictionary of American Family Names: 3-Volume Set. 3. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. p. 475. ISBN   978-0-19-508137-4. OCLC   51655476 . Retrieved 17 January 2021.