Tidewater Sharks

Last updated
Tidewater Sharks
Tidewater sharks hockey logo.gif
City Norfolk, Virginia
League Southern Hockey League
Operated1975–1977
Home arena Norfolk Scope
ColorsRed, white, cyan
            
Owner(s) Dick Davis
Affiliates WHA (1975–77)
NHL (1975–76)
Franchise history
1975–1977Tidewater Sharks

The Tidewater Sharks were a minor league professional ice hockey team, based in Norfolk, Virginia, and members of the Southern Hockey League from 1975 to 1977. The Sharks played home games at the Norfolk Scope, and shared the Hampton Roads area with the Hampton Gulls. The ownership group led by Dick Davis, also operated the Tidewater Tides baseball team. [1] The Sharks ceased operations in January on 1977, during the second season of play. [2]

Norfolk, Virginia Independent city in Virginia, United States

Norfolk is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. At the 2010 census, the population was 242,803; in 2017, the population was estimated to be 244,703 making it the second-most populous city in Virginia after neighboring Virginia Beach.

Norfolk Scope architectural structure

Norfolk Scope is a multi-function complex in Norfolk, Virginia, comprising an 11,000-person arena, a 2,500-person theater known as Chrysler Hall, a 10,000 square foot-exhibition hall and a 600-car parking garage.

Hampton Roads Metropolitan area in the United States

Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water that serves as a wide channel for the James, Nansemond and Elizabeth rivers between Old Point Comfort and Sewell's Point where the Chesapeake Bay flows into the Atlantic Ocean and the surrounding metropolitan region located in the Southeastern Virginia and Northeastern North Carolina portions of the Tidewater region.

Contents

History

In the 1975-76 season, Tidewater was affiliated with the Cleveland Crusaders, and the Buffalo Sabres. [3] John Hanna was named the team's first coach, and the Sharks featured Scotland-born top scorer Bill Steele, but finished in fifth place finish, and missed the playoffs. [2]

Cleveland Crusaders

The Cleveland Crusaders were a professional ice hockey team from Cleveland, Ohio. They played in the World Hockey Association from 1972 to 1976. Their home ice was the Cleveland Arena from 1972 to 1974, and the Richfield Coliseum from 1974 to 1976.

Buffalo Sabres hockey team of the National Hockey League

The Buffalo Sabres are a professional ice hockey team based in Buffalo, New York. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The team was established in 1970, along with the Vancouver Canucks, when the league expanded to 14 teams. They have played at KeyBank Center since 1996. Prior to that, the Buffalo Sabres played at the Buffalo Memorial Auditorium from the start of the franchise in 1970. The Sabres are owned by Terry Pegula, who purchased the club in 2011.

John Isaac "Junior" Hanna was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman and coach. Hanna is considered to be the first player in the National Hockey League (NHL) of Lebanese descent.

In the 1976-77 season, Tidewater was affiliated with the Calgary Cowboys. [3] Harold Schooley took over the coaching duties, and the team was in second place by early 1977. [2] On January 7, the Tidewater Sharks folded after missing payroll, and the players refused to continue. [1] [4]

The Calgary Cowboys were an ice hockey team that played two seasons in the World Hockey Association (WHA) from 1975–1977. The Cowboys played at the Stampede Corral in Calgary. The franchise was founded in 1972 as the Miami Screaming Eagles, though it never played a game in Miami. The team was based in Philadelphia and Vancouver, known in both markets as the Blazers, before relocating to Calgary. The franchise folded in 1977.

Notable players

Notable Sharks players that also played in the National Hockey League or World Hockey Association: [5]

National Hockey League North American professional ice hockey league

The National Hockey League is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world, and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. The Stanley Cup, the oldest professional sports trophy in North America, is awarded annually to the league playoff champion at the end of each season.

World Hockey Association defunct ice hockey major league from 1972 to 1979

The World Hockey Association was a professional ice hockey major league that operated in North America from 1972 to 1979. It was the first major league to compete with the National Hockey League (NHL) since the collapse of the Western Hockey League in 1926. Although the WHA was not the first league since that time to attempt to challenge the NHL's supremacy, it was by far the most successful in the modern era.

Ronald Frank Anderson is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey defenceman who played 115 games in the World Hockey Association for the Chicago Cougars and Cleveland Crusaders.

Yves Archambault is a former professional ice hockey goaltender. He played in the World Hockey Association with the Philadelphia and Vancouver Blazers. In his WHA career, Archambault played in 11 games. His career goals against average was 5.05.

Ronald Ashton is a former WHA left winger for the Winnipeg Jets. In the World Hockey Association, he played 36 games and registering 16 goals, 20 assists, and 366 penalty minutes. He was best known as a fourth line player, enforcer, and for accumulating over 100 penalty minutes in a game, setting and maintaining a record which still stands in the now defunct WHA. Ashton's stint with the Jets included him playing with the likes of hockey superstars Bobby Hull, Anders Hedberg and Ulf Nilsson.

Results

Season-by-season results: [2]

SeasonGPWLTPtsPctGFGAPIMStandingPlayoffs
1975–76 72243414620.4312302608425th, SHLOut of playoffs
1976–77 4126132540.6591581315802nd, SHLFolded
TOTALS1135047161160.5133883911422 

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References

  1. 1 2 Crossley, Drew (2014-08-30). "Southern Hockey League 1973 Archives". Fun While It Lasted. Retrieved 2018-02-03.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Tidewater Sharks hockey team statistics and history". hockeydb.com. Retrieved 2018-02-03.
  3. 1 2 "Tidewater Sharks Parent Team affiliate history". hockeydb.com. Retrieved 2018-02-03.
  4. "Southern Hockey League [1973-1977] history and statistics". hockeydb.com. Retrieved 2018-02-03.
  5. "Tidewater Sharks all-time player list". hockeydb.com. Retrieved 2018-02-03.