Tim Sweeney (ice hockey)

Last updated
Tim Sweeney
Born (1967-04-12) April 12, 1967 (age 56)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Left wing
Shot Left
Played for Calgary Flames
Boston Bruins
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
New York Rangers
National teamFlag of the United States.svg  United States
NHL Draft 122nd overall, 1985
Calgary Flames
Playing career 19891999

Timothy Paul Sweeney (born April 12, 1967) is an American former professional ice hockey player who played in the National Hockey League from 1990 to 1998 with the Calgary Flames, Boston Bruins, Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, and New York Rangers. He was born in Boston, but grew up in Weymouth, Massachusetts. Sweeney played for Boston College from 1985–89, and then made his professional debut in 1989, and aside from playing in the NHL played in the minor leagues. Internationally Sweeney played for the American national team at the 1992 Winter Olympics and 1994 World Championship.

Contents

Playing career

He was selected 122nd overall in the 1985 NHL Entry Draft by the Calgary Flames.

After college, Sweeney played for the Salt Lake Golden Eagles of the IHL, and then in the NHL for the Calgary Flames, the Boston Bruins, the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim and the New York Rangers. Sweeney left his legacy on the NHL by being recognized as the only player to play for only these four clubs during his career. His last professional season was 1998–99, for the Providence Bruins of the AHL.

In his first year after college, the 1989–90 season, he won the International Hockey League's Ken McKenzie Trophy for Rookie of the Year. Sweeney represented the United States at the 1992 Winter Olympics. [1]

Post retirement

After retiring from hockey, Sweeney worked as a color commentator for Boston College and Hockey East games. [2] [3]

Personal life

Sweeney is married to Chrissy (Roche) Sweeney. Together they have three children, Lily, Emily, and Timothy Sweeney. [4]

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1983–84 Weymouth High School HS-MA23332659
1984–85Weymouth High SchoolHS-MA22325688
1985–86 Boston College HE 3284128
1986–87 Boston CollegeHE3831164928
1987–88 Boston CollegeHE189112018
1988–89 Boston CollegeHE3929447326
1989–90 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 8146519732115494
1990–91 Calgary Flames NHL 4279168
1990–91 Salt Lake Golden EaglesIHL31191635843360
1991–92 Calgary FlamesNHL111234
1991–92 United States National Team Intl219112010
1992–93 Boston Bruins NHL14178630000
1992–93 Providence Bruins AHL 604155963232240
1993–94 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL7816274349
1994–95 Mighty Ducks of AnaheimNHL131122
1994–95 Providence BruinsAHL2224013817256
1995–96 Boston BruinsNHL4188161410002
1995–96 Providence BruinsAHL3417223912
1996–97 Boston BruinsNHL3610112114
1996–97 Providence BruinsAHL231122336
1997–98 New York Rangers NHL5611182926
1997–98 Hartford Wolf Pack AHL72688
1998–99 Providence BruinsAHL20000
NHL totals291558313812340002

International

YearTeamEventGPGAPtsPIM
1992 United States OLY 83476
1994 United States WC 83250
Senior totals1666126

Awards and honors

AwardYear
All-Hockey East First Team 1988–89 [5]
AHCA East Second-Team All-American 1988–89 [6]
Hockey East All-Tournament Team 1989 [7]

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References

  1. Loftus, Marcus (March 22, 2018). "Hanover's Timmy Sweeney outdoes his dad with Frozen Four appearance". Hanover Mariner. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  2. "Former NHL Star And Boston College Alumnus Adds Color To Hockey East". amcnetworks.com. January 4, 2001. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  3. "South Shore athletes have found Olympic glory". Hanover Mariner. February 23, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  4. "Ducks Will Welcome Back Players from Original Team at Sunday's Throwback Night". NHL.com. October 9, 2013. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  5. "Hockey East All-Teams". College Hockey Historical Archives. Retrieved May 19, 2013.
  6. "Men's Ice Hockey Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA.org. Retrieved June 11, 2013.
  7. "2013-14 Hockey East Media Guide". Hockey East. Retrieved 2014-05-19.
Awards and achievements
Preceded by Hockey East Scoring Champion
1988–89
Succeeded by