Timetrap

Last updated
Timetrap
Timetrap.jpg
Author David Dvorkin
LanguageEnglish
Series Star Trek
Release number
40
Publisher Pocket Books
Publication date
1988
Pages221 [1]
ISBN 0671648705
Preceded by Time for Yesterday  
Followed by The Three-Minute Universe  

Timetrap ( ISBN   0671648705) [1] is an original-series Star Trek novel by David Dvorkin, published by Pocket Books [2] in 1988. [3] For the week of June 12, 1988, Timetrap was the fifth-best-selling paperback book on The New York Times Best Seller list. The novel originally sold for US$3.95(equivalent to $9.77 in 2022). [2] Timetrap is Pocket's 40th numbered novel from the retronymed Star Trek: The Original Series. Simon & Schuster released an e-book version in September 2000. [4]

Contents

The plot of the novel concerns Captain Kirk's kidnapping and brainwashing by Klingons to believe that he's time-traveled 100 years into his future. Ellen Cheeseman-Meyer, writing for Tor.com , described the story as dealing with the philosophy of perception and "drugs. Lots and lots of drugs." [3]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Dvorkin, David (1988). Timetrap - David Dvorkin - Google Books. Simon and Schuster. ISBN   9780671648701 . Retrieved 2018-12-29.
  2. 1 2 "Paperback Best Sellers". The New York Times . 1988-06-12. ISSN   0362-4331. OCLC   1645522.
  3. 1 2 Cheeseman-Meyer, Ellen (2017-02-24). "Klingons Drug Everyone: David Dvorkin's Timetrap". Tor.com . Tor Books. Archived from the original on 2017-04-23. Retrieved 2018-12-29.
  4. Timetrap eBook by David Dvorkin | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster. Simon & Schuster. 22 September 2000. ISBN   9780743419918. Archived from the original on 2017-10-30. Retrieved 2018-12-29.