Titles and styles of Napoleon

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Napoleon, a French military and political leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution, received many honours.

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Charles XV of Sweden King of Sweden and Norway

Charles XV also Carl ; Swedish: Karl XV and Norwegian: Karl IV was King of Sweden and Norway from 1859 until his death. Though known as King Charles XV in Sweden, he was actually the ninth Swedish king by that name, as his predecessor Charles IX had adopted a numeral according to a fictitious history of Sweden.

Christian VIII of Denmark King of Denmark

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William I, German Emperor 19th-century German Emperor and King of Prussia

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Ludwig I of Bavaria King of Bavaria

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Frederick William III of Prussia King of Prussia

Frederick William III was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. He ruled Prussia during the difficult times of the Napoleonic Wars. Steering a careful course between France and her enemies, after a major military defeat in 1806, he was humiliated by Napoleon, and Prussia was stripped of recent gains and forced to pay huge financial penalties. The king reluctantly joined the coalition against Napoleon in the Befreiungskriege. Following Napoleon's defeat, he took part in the Congress of Vienna, which assembled to settle the political questions arising from the new, post-Napoleonic order in Europe. His major interests were internal, the reform of Prussia's Protestant churches. He was determined to unify the Protestant churches, to homogenize their liturgy, their organization, and even their architecture. The long-term goal was to have fully centralized royal control of all the Protestant churches in the Prussian Union of Churches. The king was said to be extremely shy and indecisive. His wife Queen Louise (1776–1810) was his most important political advisor. She led a very powerful group that included Baron vom Stein, Prince von Hardenberg, von Scharnhorst, and Count Gneisenau. They set about reforming Prussia's administration, churches, finance and military.

Adolphe, Grand Duke of Luxembourg Grand Duke of Luxembourg

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Frederick William IV of Prussia King of Prussia

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Maximilian II of Bavaria King of Bavaria

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George V of Hanover King of Hanover

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Archduke Franz Karl of Austria Austrian archduke

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George, King of Saxony King of Saxony

George was a King of Saxony of the House of Wettin.

Frederick I, Grand Duke of Baden Grand Duke of Baden

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Prince Alexander of Hesse and by Rhine Prince of Hesse and by Rhine

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Francis, Duke of Cádiz Duke of Cádiz

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Prince Ferdinand of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Prince of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

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Prince Frederick of the Netherlands Dutch prince

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Prince Philippe, Count of Flanders Belgian prince

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Military Merit Order (Württemberg) award of the Kingdom of Württemberg

The Military Merit Order (Militärverdienstorden) was a military order of the Kingdom of Württemberg, which joined the German Empire in 1871. The order was one of the older military orders of the states of the German Empire. It was founded on February 11, 1759 by Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg as the Militär-Carls-Orden, and was renamed the Militärverdienstorden on November 11, 1806 by King Friedrich I. The order underwent several more revisions over the course of the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became obsolete with the fall of the Württemberg monarchy in the wake of Germany's defeat in World War I.

References

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  2. Hof- und Staatshandbuch des Königreichs Bayern: 1812. Landesamt. 1812. p. 27.
  3. J ..... -H ..... -Fr ..... Berlien (1846). Der Elephanten-Orden und seine Ritter. Berling. pp.  122–124.
  4. https://web.archive.org/web/20070105014708/http://www.4dw.net/royalark/Persia/Orders/sun.htm
  5. Bragança, Jose Vicente de (2011). "A Evolução da Banda das Três Ordens Militares (1789-1826)" [The Evolution of the Band of the Three Military Orders (1789-1826)]. Lusíada História (in Portuguese). 2 (8): 272. ISSN   0873-1330 . Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  6. Liste der Ritter des Königlich Preußischen Hohen Ordens vom Schwarzen Adler (1851), "Von Seiner Majestät dem Könige Friedrich Wilhelm III. ernannte Ritter" p. 15
  7. Sergey Semenovich Levin (2003). "Lists of Knights and Ladies". Order of the Holy Apostle Andrew the First-called (1699-1917). Order of the Holy Great Martyr Catherine (1714-1917). Moscow.
  8. "Caballeros Existentes en la Insignie Orden del Toyson de Oro", Calendario manual y guía de forasteros en Madrid (in Spanish): 41, 1806, retrieved 17 March 2020
  9. Per Nordenvall (1998). "Kungl. Maj:ts Orden". Kungliga Serafimerorden: 1748–1998 (in Swedish). Stockholm. ISBN   91-630-6744-7.
  10. Württemberg (1858). Königlich-Württembergisches Hof- und Staats-Handbuch: 1858. Guttenberg. p. 31.