Tod of the Fens

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Tod of the Fens is a children's historical novel by Elinor Whitney Field. Set in Boston, England, in the early fifteenth century, it is a light-hearted adventure about Tod, a boy who lives with a band of men outside town, and Prince Hal, the heir to the throne, who disguises himself so he can move among the people incognito. [1] The novel, illustrated by Warwick Goble, was first published in 1928 and was a Newbery Honor recipient in 1929. [2]

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References

  1. The Newbery & Caldecott Awards: a Guide to the Medal and Honor Books by the Association for Library Service to Children, ALA Editions, 2009, page 84
  2. "Newbery Medal and Honor Books, 1922-Present". American Library Association . Retrieved 2009-12-30.