Tom Williams

Last updated

Tom Williams or Tommy Williams may refer to:

Contents

Sports

Football and rugby

Other sports

Arts and entertainment

Politics

Others

See also

Related Research Articles

Robert, Rob, Robbie, Bob or Bobby Williams may refer to:

David or Dave Williams may refer to:

Tom Smith may refer to:

Ellis is a unisex first name and a surname of Welsh and English origin. The surname was first recorded in 1202 in Lincolnshire, England. An independent French origin of the surname derives from the phrase fleur-de-lis.

Turnbull is a northern English and Scottish surname. For theories of its etymology, see Clan Turnbull.

Frank Williams may refer to:

Darren is a masculine given name of uncertain etymological origins. Some theories state that it originated from an Anglicisation of the Irish first name Darragh or Dáire, meaning "Oak Tree". According to other sources, it is thought to come from the Gaelic surname meaning ‘great’, but is also linked to a Welsh mountain named Moel Darren. It is also believed to be a variant of Darrell, which originated from the French surname D'Airelle, meaning "of Airelle". The common spelling of Darren is found in the Welsh language, meaning "edge": Black Darren and Red Darren are found on the eastern side of the Hatterrall Ridge, west of Long Town. Darren has several spelling variations including: Daren, Darin, Daryn, Darrin, Darrenn, and Darryn.

Nic is a male given name, often short for Nicholas or Dominic. It is also a component of Irish-language female surnames. It may refer to:

The surname Collins has a variety of likely origins in Britain and Ireland:

  1. Anglo-Saxon and Scottish: A patronymic surname based on the English and Scottish name Colin, an English diminutive form of Nicholas.
  2. Norse: From the Old Norse personal name "Kollungr" a form of "koli" which in Old English became 'Cola', meaning swarthy or dark.
  3. Irish: The medieval surname was Ua Cuiléin, which has usually become Ó Coileáin today.
  4. Welsh: Collen; hazel, hazel grove.

Gavin is a male given name. It is a variation on the medieval name Gawain, meaning "God send" or "white hawk". Sir Gawain was a knight of King Arthur's Round Table. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is an epic poem connected with King Arthur's Round Table. Gawain beheads the Green Knight who promptly replaces his head and threatens Gawain an identical fate the same time next year. Decapitation figures elsewhere: the Italian name Gavino (considered equivalent to Gavin) is the name of an early Christian martyr who was beheaded in 300 AD, his head being thrown in the Mediterranean Sea only later reunited and interred with his body.

Edwards is a patronymic surname, which arose separately in England and Wales. It means "son of Edward". Edwards is the 14th most common surname in Wales and 21st most common in England. Within the United States, it was ranked as the 49th-most common surname as surveyed in 1990, falling to 51st in 2014.

Thomas is a common surname of English, Welsh, Irish, Scottish, French, German, Dutch, and Danish origin.

The surname Giles or Gyles comes from the given name Giles, for which multiple origins have been suggested.

Howell is a surname originating from Wales. It is not a particularly common name among those of Welsh ancestry, as it is an Anglicized form of the Welsh name Hywel. It originates in a dynasty of kings in Wales and Brittany in the 9th and 10th century, and three Welsh royal houses of that time onwards. The Tudor Royal house of England was also descended from them. See also: Powell (surname), and Welsh surnames.

Dwyer is an Irish surname which is a slightly anglicised variation of O'Dwyer.

Robertson is a patronymic surname, meaning "son of Robert". It originated in Scotland and northern England. Notable people with the surname include:

Gwyn, Gwynn or Gwynne, are given names or surnames meaning "white" or/and "blessed" in Welsh and Cornish.