Tonkin Island

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Tonkin Island ( 67°49′S65°3′W / 67.817°S 65.050°W / -67.817; -65.050 Coordinates: 67°49′S65°3′W / 67.817°S 65.050°W / -67.817; -65.050 ) is a narrow, ice-capped island in Antarctica. It is 3.5 nautical miles (6 km) long in a north-south direction, marked by ice-free peaks at each end, lying 11 nautical miles (20 km) southeast of Choyce Point, Bowman Coast, in Larsen Ice Shelf. The island was discovered and photographed from the air by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in 1940. It was charted by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1947 and named after John E. Tonkin, FIDS general assistant at Stonington Island, 1945–47; named Lewis Island by Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) following additional aerial photography, 1947. The names Isla Mateo de Toro Zambrano and Isla Riquelme, referring to the north and south parts of this feature shown as two islands, appear on a Chilean hydrographic chart, 1947.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Ice cap ice mass that covers less than 50,000 km² of land area

An ice cap is a mass of ice that covers less than 50,000 km2 of land area. Larger ice masses covering more than 50,000 km2 are termed ice sheets.

Island Any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water. Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines.

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PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Tonkin Island" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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