Tony Macaulay

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Tony Macaulay
Birth nameAnthony Gordon Instone
Born (1944-04-21) 21 April 1944 (age 76)
Fulham, London, England
Occupation(s) Record producer
Composer
Songwriter
Author
Website Official site

Tony Macaulay (born Anthony Gordon Instone, 21 April 1944) [1] is an English author, composer for musical theatre, and songwriter. He has won the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors Award twice as 'Songwriter of the Year' (1970 and 1977). [2] He is a nine time Ivor Novello Awards winning songwriter. In 2007, he became the only British person to win the Edwin Forrest Award for outstanding contribution to the American theatre. [3]

Contents

Macaulay's best-known songs include "Baby Now That I've Found You" and "Build Me Up Buttercup" with The Foundations, "(Last Night) I Didn't Get to Sleep at All," as well as "Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)" and "Don't Give Up on Us".

Career

Macaulay was born in Fulham, London, England. [1]

In the early 1960s he worked as a song plugger for Essex Publishing, then moved to Pye Records as a record producer. [1] It was here that he had his first major success with The Foundations, when they recorded, "Baby Now That I've Found You", a song he had co-written with John Macleod, and it topped the UK Singles Chart in November 1967. [1] [4]

Further hits came with songs such as Marmalade's "Baby Make It Soon" [5] and "Falling Apart at the Seams"; [6] The 5th Dimension's "(Last Night) I Didn't Get to Sleep at All", [7] David Soul's "Don't Give Up on Us", [8] plus Donna Summer's 1977 single "Can't We Just Sit Down (And Talk It Over)", [9] each of which he wrote on his own. Many others came in collaboration with other songwriters, amongst them were Long John Baldry's "Let the Heartaches Begin", [10] Paper Dolls' "Something Here in My Heart (Keeps A Tellin' Me No)" [11] and Pickettywitch's "That Same Old Feeling", [12] all co-written with John Macleod. Another success for The Foundations was "Build Me Up Buttercup", written by Macaulay and Mike D'Abo. [13] Scott Walker's "Lights of Cincinnati", [14] The Hollies' "Sorry Suzanne", [15] The New Seekers' "You Won't Find Another Fool Like Me" [16] [1] were penned with Geoff Stephens; whilst Edison Lighthouse's "Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)", was written with Sylvan Whittingham and Barry Mason. [17] In addition, he co-wrote Johnny Johnson and the Bandwagon's "Blame It on the Pony Express" [18] and Andy Williams' "Home Lovin' Man", with Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway. [19] [1]

Much of his attention in the early 1970s was diverted by a protracted legal dispute with his publishers. [1] He won his case on appeal in 1974, in a landmark decision which encouraged other artists to challenge the terms of their contracts. [20] By this time he had begun to turn his back on writing pop songs and started to write for musical theatre. His first collaborations for the stage were with the playwright Ken Hill on Is Your Doctor Really Necessary? in 1973, and on Gentlemen Prefer Anything the following year. [1]

He composed the scores to the films The Beast in the Cellar (1970) and Percy's Progress (1974), and was the music co-ordinator for the film Never Too Young to Rock (1975). He also wrote the music for Windy City , a musical in two acts based on The Front Page by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur, with book and lyrics by Dick Vosburgh, which was premiered on stage in 1982. [1]

Later Macaulay turned to writing thrillers. [21]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Eder, Bruce (21 April 1944). "Tony Macaulay - Music Biography, Credits and Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  2. "Official Website". Tony Macaulay. 22 January 2011. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  3. "Official Website". Tony Macaulay. 22 January 2011. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  4. Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 209. ISBN   1-904994-10-5.
  5. "Baby Make It Soon - Marmalade : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  6. "Falling Apart at the Seams - Marmalade : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  7. Greenwald, Matthew. "(Last Night) I Didn't Get to Sleep at All - The 5th Dimension : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  8. "David Soul - Don't Give Up on Us / Black Bean Soup (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  9. "Donna Summer - Can't We Just Sit Down (And Talk It Over) / I Feel Love (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  10. "Let the Heartaches Begin - Long John Baldry : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  11. "Something Here in My Heart (Keeps A-Tellin' Me No) - Paper Dolls : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  12. "That Same Old Feeling - Pickettywitch : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  13. "Build Me Up Buttercup - The Foundations : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  14. "Scott Walker - Lights of Cincinnati (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
  15. "Sorry Suzanne - The Hollies : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
  16. "You Won't Find Another Fool Like Me - The New Seekers : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 31 December 2012.
  17. "Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) - Edison Lighthouse : Listen, Appearances, Song Review". AllMusic. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  18. "Johnny Johnson And His Bandwagon* - (Blame It) On The Pony Express (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  19. "Andy Williams - Home Lovin' Man (Vinyl) at Discogs". Discogs. Retrieved 2 January 2013.
  20. "British Bubblegum: the Works of Tony Macaulay, Roger Cook and Roger Greenaway | Bubblegum University". Bubblegum-music.com. 4 May 2006. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  21. "Official Website". Tony Macaulay. 22 January 2011. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2013.