Translation (ecclesiastical)

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Translation is the transfer of a bishop from one episcopal see to another. The word is from the Latin trānslātiō, meaning "carry across". [1] [2] (Another religious meaning of the term is the translation of relics.)

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References

  1. Lloyd, Ronald Henry (1984). A Pocket Guide to the Anglican Church. Mowbray. ISBN   978-0-264-66996-0.
  2. Corèdon, Christopher; Williams, Ann (2007). A Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. Brewer. ISBN   978-1-84384-138-8.