UEFA Women's Euro 1993

Last updated
UEFA Women's Euro 1993
Campionato europeo di calcio femminile 1993
Tournament details
Host country Italy
Dates 29 June – 4 July
Teams 4
Venue(s) 4 (in 4 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Norway.svg  Norway (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of Italy.svg  Italy
Third placeFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Tournament statistics
Matches played 4
Goals scored 8 (2 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Denmark.svg Susan Mackensie
(2 goals)
Best player Flag of Norway.svg Hege Riise
1991
1995

The 1993 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1993 was a football tournament that happened between 1991 and 1993 (with the qualifying round). The final games was held in Italy. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the "European Cup", held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

Contents

Norway won the competition against Italy who played at home in the Final. [1]

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Format

In the qualifying round, 23 teams divided into 8 groups (all of 3 teams, except 1 which had two) and the winner of each group would be qualified into the quarter-finals of the Competition. Then teams played a 2-leg knockout round. In the semifinals and final, only one game would be played and the winner of the final would be proclaimed the Champion. The losers of the semifinals would play a Third Place playoff game.

Qualification

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1993 UEFA Women's Championship squads

Results

Semifinals

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg1–0Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
A. Nymark Andersen Soccerball shade.svg 63' DBU Report (in Danish)
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
Sportilia, Santa Sofia
Attendance: 1,000
Referee: Plarent Kotherja (Albania)
Italy  Flag of Italy.svg1–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Morace Soccerball shade.svg 63' DFB Report (in German)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 56'
Penalties
Marsiletti Soccerball shad check.svg
Salmaso Soccerball shad check.svg
Ferraguzzi Soccerball shad check.svg
Iozzelli Soccerball shad check.svg
4–3Soccerball shad check.svg Wiegmann
Soccerball shad check.svg Austermühl
Soccerball shad check.svg Pohlmann
Soccerball shade cross.svg ??
Soccerball shade cross.svg ??
Stadio Romeo Neri, Rimini
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Anders Frisk (Sweden)

Third place playoff

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Meinert Soccerball shade.svg 31' DBU Report (in Danish)
DFB Report (in German)
Mackensie Soccerball shade.svg 10', 42'
Nissen Soccerball shade.svg 35'

Final

Italy  Flag of Italy.svg0–1Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Hegstad Soccerball shade.svg 75'
Stadio Dino Manuzzi, Cesena
Attendance: 7,000
Referee: Alfred Wieser (Austria)

Awards

 Women's Euro 1993 Champions 
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Second title

Goalscorers

2 goals
1 goal

See also

Related Research Articles

UEFA Euro 1980 1980 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 1980 UEFA European Football Championship final tournament was held in Italy. This was the sixth European Football Championship, which is held every four years and endorsed by UEFA. It was the first edition to feature eight teams, taking place between 11 and 22 June 1980. West Germany won the final 2–1 for their second title. This was the last European Championship with a third place play-off.

UEFA Euro 1968 1968 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 1968 UEFA European Football Championship final tournament was held in Italy. This was the third European Football Championship, an event held every four years and organised by UEFA. The final tournament took place between 5 and 10 June 1968.

The 2005 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2005, was a football tournament for women held from 5 June to 19 June 2005 in Lancashire, England and Cheshire, England. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 1992 UEFA European Under-21 Championship, which spanned two years (1990–92), had 32 entrants. Malta and Israel competed for the first time. This was also the first appearance of the unified Germany team. Italy U-21s won the competition.

The 1991 UEFA Women's Championship took place in Denmark. It was won by Germany in a final against Norway in a repeat of the previous edition's final. Eighteen teams entered qualifying, which was enough to make the competition the first fully official one, so the name was changed to the UEFA Women's Championship.

The 1997 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1997 was a football tournament held in 1997 in Norway and Sweden. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995. The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

2011 UEFA European Under-21 Championship

UEFA European Under-21 Championship 2011 was the 18th staging of UEFA's European Under-21 Championship. The final tournament was hosted by Denmark between 11 and 25 June 2011.

2013 UEFA European Under-21 Championship

2013 UEFA European Under-21 Championship was the 19th staging of UEFA's European Under-21 Championship. The final tournament was hosted by Israel between the 5–18 June 2013.

UEFA Womens Euro 2013 2013 edition of the UEFA Womens Euro

The 2013 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as Women's Euro 2013, was the 11th European Championship for women's national football teams organised by UEFA. The final tournament, held in Sweden from 10 to 28 July 2013, became the most-watched in the history of the Women's Euros. It concluded with Germany, the defending champions, winning their sixth consecutive and eighth overall Women's Euro title after defeating Norway in the final.

2012 UEFA European Under-19 Championship 2012 UEFA European Under-19 Football Championship

The 2012 UEFA European Under-19 Championship was the 61st edition of UEFA's European Under-19 Championship and took place in Estonia from 3 to 15 July. Spain are the title holders. This competition also acted as a qualifying competition for the 2013 FIFA U-20 World Cup, as six sides from Europe qualify.

UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying play-offs

The UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying play-off ties were played over two legs, with the first legs on 11 November and the second legs on 15 November 2011. The four winners are found according to the standard rules for the knockout phase in European competitions, and the winners qualified for the Euro 2012 tournament. Qualifying play-offs was a second stage (round) of UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying.

2017 UEFA European Under-21 Championship

The 2017 UEFA European Under-21 Championship was the 21st edition of the UEFA European Under-21 Championship, a biennial international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-21 national teams of Europe. The final tournament was hosted in Poland for the first time, after their bid was selected by the UEFA Executive Committee on 26 January 2015 in Nyon, Switzerland. The tournament took place from 16–30 June 2017. Players born on or after 1 January 1994 were eligible for the tournament.

The 2015 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 14th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, the annual European youth football competition contested by the women's under-19 national teams of the member associations of UEFA. Israel hosted the tournament. Players born on or after 1 January 1996 were eligible to participate in this competition.

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

UEFA Futsal Euro 2016

The 2016 UEFA Futsal Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Futsal Euro 2016, was the 10th edition of the UEFA Futsal Championship, the biennial international futsal championship organised by UEFA for the men's national teams of Europe. It was hosted for the first time in Serbia, following a decision of the UEFA Executive Committee on 20 March 2012. Serbia was chosen ahead of other bids from Bulgaria and Macedonia.

2017 UEFA Womens Under-19 Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship was the 16th edition of the UEFA Women's Under-19 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the women's under-19 national teams of Europe. Northern Ireland was selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015 as the host country for the tournament.

2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The 2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship was the 16th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-17 national teams of Europe. Croatia, which were selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015, hosted the tournament.

The UEFA Euro 1972 qualifying play-offs were the last round of qualifying competition for UEFA Euro 1972. They were contested by the eight group winners of the UEFA Euro 1972 qualifying tournament. The winners of each of four home and away ties qualified for the final tournament in Belgium. The matches were played on 29–30 April and 13–14 May 1972, with a replay on 17 May 1972.

The UEFA Euro 1968 qualifying play-offs were the last round of qualifying competition for UEFA Euro 1968. They were contested by the eight group winners of the UEFA Euro 1968 qualifying tournament. The winners of each of four home and away ties qualified for the final tournament in France. The matches were played in April and May 1968.

References

  1. "1993: Azzurre left feeling blue –". Uefa.com. Retrieved 2012-08-23.