Bettina Wiegmann

Last updated

Bettina Wiegmann
Personal information
Date of birth (1971-10-07) 7 October 1971 (age 46)
Place of birth Euskirchen, West Germany
Height 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1978–1982 TSV Feytal
1982–1984 TuS Mechernich
1984–1988 SpVgg Bleibuir-Voissel
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1988–2001 1. FC Köln
2001–2002 Boston Breakers
2003 1. FC Köln
National team
1989–2003 Germany 154 (51)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Bettina Wiegmann (born 7 October 1971 in Euskirchen) is a retired German football midfielder. She scored 51 goals in 154 caps for the German national team between 1989 and 2003. In 1997 she was selected German Female Footballer of the Year .

Euskirchen Place in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Euskirchen is a town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, capital of the district Euskirchen. While Euskirchen resembles a modern shopping town, it also has a history dating back over 700 years, having been granted town status in 1302. As of December 2007, it had a population of 55,446.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Contents

Honours

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by Germany. They won their first women's world title and became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup. The men's team had won the World Cup three times at the time.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Association football has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program in 1996.

Matches and goals scored at World Cup and Olympic tournaments

Bettina Wiegmann competed in four FIFA Women's World Cup: China 1991, Sweden 1995, USA 1999 and USA 2003; and two Olympics: Atlanta 1996, and Sydney 2000; played 30 matches and scored 14 goals. [1] Along with her Germany teams, Wiegmann is a world champion from USA 2003, runner-up from Sweden 1995; and bronze medalist from Sydney 2000.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by the host team. The final between the U.S. and China, held on 10 July at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, was the most-attended women's sports event in history with an official attendance of 90,185. U.S. President Bill Clinton was among those in attendance. The final was scoreless after extra time and won by the U.S. in a penalty shootout. This remains the only Women's World Cup tournament in which the host nation has won.

GoalMatchDateLocationOpponentLineupMinScoreResultCompetition
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup
1
1991-11-17 [m 1] Jiangmen Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Start

4–0 W

Group stage
1
2
1991-11-19 [m 2] Zhongshan Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei Start101–0

3–0 W

Group stage
3
1991-11-21 [m 3] Zhongshan Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Start1–0

2–0 W

Group stage
2
4
1991-11-24 [m 4] Zhongshan Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Start17 pk1–0

2–1 aet W

Quarter-final
3
5
1991-11-27 [m 5] Guangzhou Flag of the United States.svg  United States Start632–4

2–5 L

Semifinal
6
1991-11-29 [m 6] Guangzhou Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start

0–4 L

Third place match
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
7
1995-06-05 [m 7] Karlstad Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Start

1–0 W

Group stage
4
8
1995-06-07 [m 8] Helsingborg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start9 pk1–0

2–3 L

Group stage
5
9
1995-06-09 [m 9] Karlstad Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

off 83' (on Wunderlich)

42 pk3–1

6–1 W

Group stage
10
1995-06-13 [m 10] Västerås Flag of England.svg  England Start

3–0 W

Quarter-final
6
11
1995-06-15 [m 11] Helsingborg Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start881–0

1–0 W

Semifinal
12
1995-06-18 [m 12] Solna Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

0–2 L

Final
Flag of the United States.svg Atlanta 1996 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
7
13
1996-07-21 [m 13] Birmingham Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Start51–0

3–2 W

Group match
8
14
1996-07-23 [m 14] Washington Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start321–1

2–3 L

Group match
15
1996-07-25 [m 15] Birmingham Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start1–0

1–1 D

Group match
Flag of the United States.svg USA 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup
9
16
1999-06-20 [m 16] Los Angeles Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Start61 pk1–0

1–1 D

Group match
17
1999-06-24 [m 17] Portland Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico Start

6–0 W

Group match
10
18
1999-06-27 [m 18] Washington Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start46 pk2–2

3–3 D

Group match
11
19
1999-07-01 [m 19] Washington Flag of the United States.svg  United States Start45+12–1

2–3 L

Quarter-final
Flag of Australia.svg Sydney 2000 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
12
20
2000-09-13 [m 20] Canberra Flag of Australia.svg  Australia Start702–0

3–0 W

Group match
21
2000-09-16 [m 21] Canberra Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start

2–1 W

Group match
22
2000-09-19 [m 22] Melbourne Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start

1–0 W

Group match
23
2000-09-24 [m 23] Sydney Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

0–1 L

Semifinal
24
2000-09-28 [m 24] Sydney Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start

2–0 W

Bronze medal match
Flag of the United States.svg USA 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
13
25
2003-09-20 [m 25] Columbus Flag of Canada.svg  Canada start; ( c )39 pk1–1

4–1 W

Group match
26
2003-09-24 [m 26] Columbus Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

off 78' (on Kuenzer); ( c )

3–0 W

Group match
14
27
2003-09-27 [m 27] Washington Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina start; ( c )24 pk2–0

6–1 W

Group match
28
2003-10-02 [m 28] Portland Flag of Russia.svg  Russia

off 66' (on Kuenzer) ( c )

7–1 W

Quarter-final
29
2003-10-05 [m 29] Portland Flag of the United States.svg  United States start; ( c )

3–0 W

Semifinal
30
2003-10-12 [m 30] Carson Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden start; ( c )

2–1 aet W

Final

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This is a list of records of the FIFA Women's World Cup and its qualification matches.

References

  1. "FIFA Player Statistics: Bettina Wiegmann". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
Match reports
  1. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991: MATCH Report: Germany – Nigeria : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  2. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991: MATCH Report: Chinese Taipei – Germany : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  3. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991: MATCH Report: Italy – Germany : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  4. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991: MATCH Report: Denmark – Germany : Quarter-finals". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  5. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991: MATCH Report: Germany – USA : Semifinal". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  6. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 1991: MATCH Report: Sweden – Germany : Match for third place". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  7. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  8. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Sweden – Germany : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  9. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Brazil – Germany : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  10. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – England : Quarter-finals". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  11. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – China PR : Semifinal". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  12. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – Norway : Final". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  13. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : First stage". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  14. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: Norway – Germany : First stage". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  15. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: Brazil – Germany : First stage". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  16. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Germany – Italy : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  17. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Germany – Mexico : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  18. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  19. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Germany : Quarter-finals". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  20. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: Australia – Germany : First stage". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  21. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : First stage". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  22. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: Germany – Sweden : First stage". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  23. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: Germany – Norway : Semifinal". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  24. "Women's Olympics Football Tournament Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : Bronze medal match". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  25. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Canada : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  26. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  27. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Argentina – Germany : Group matches". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  28. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – RUS : Quarter-finals". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  29. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – Germany : Semifinal". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  30. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Sweden : Final". FIFA. Retrieved 8 July 2016.