Birgit Prinz

Last updated

Birgit Prinz
Birgit Prinz.jpg
Prinz with Germany in 2011
Personal information
Date of birth (1977-10-25) 25 October 1977 (age 41)
Place of birth Frankfurt am Main, West Germany
Height 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position Striker
Youth career
1986–1988 SV Dörnigheim FC
1988–1992 FC Hochstadt
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1993–1998 FSV Frankfurt 57 (45)
1998–2002 1. FFC Frankfurt 76 (78)
2002–2003 Carolina Courage 35 (23)
2003–2011 1. FFC Frankfurt 114 (136)
Total282(282)
National team
1994–2011 Germany 214 (128)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league onlyand correct as of 12:09, 2 November 2013 (UTC) [1]
‡ National team caps and goals correct as of 30 June 2011 (UTC)) [2]

Birgit Prinz (born 25 October 1977) is a German retired footballer, two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion and three-time FIFA World Player of the Year. In addition to the German national team, Prinz played for 1. FFC Frankfurt in the Frauen-Bundesliga as well as the Carolina Courage in the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first professional women's league in the United States. Prinz remains one of the game's most prolific strikers and is the second FIFA Women's World Cup all-time leading scorer with 14 goals (second only to Marta from Brazil). On 12 August 2011, she announced the end of her active career. [3] She currently works as a sport psychologist for the men's and women's teams of 1. Bundesliga club TSG 1899 Hoffenheim. [4]

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

FIFA World Player of the Year association football award

The FIFA World Player of the Year was an association football award presented annually by the sport's governing body, FIFA, between 1991 and 2015. Coaches and captains of international teams and media representatives selected the player they deem to have performed the best in the previous calendar year.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Contents

Career

Club

Prinz began her career at SV Dörnigheim FC. She made her Bundesliga debut for FSV Frankfurt, where she played from 1993 to 1998. During that time Prinz won two Bundesliga titles and two German Cups. In 1997 and 1998 she was the Bundesliga top scorer. In 1998, she moved to local rivals 1. FFC Frankfurt, where she has had her biggest success at club level. In 13 seasons at the club, Prinz won six Bundesliga and eight German Cup titles. She also won the Bundesliga top-scorer award twice more in 2001 and 2007. Prinz won the UEFA Women's Cup three times with Frankfurt, in the 2001–02, 2005–06 and 2007–08 seasons. She also reached the final in 2004, but lost to the Swedish side Umeå IK. [2]

FSV Frankfurt German association football club

Fußballsportverein Frankfurt 1899 e.V., commonly known as simply FSV Frankfurt, is a German association football club based in the Bornheim district of Frankfurt am Main, Hesse and founded in 1899. The club plays in the shadow of larger and much more successful Eintracht Frankfurt. FSV Frankfurt also fielded a rather successful women's team, which was disbanded in 2006.

1. FFC Frankfurt German womens association football club

1. FFC Frankfurt is a German women's association football club based in Frankfurt, Hesse and has a membership of about 430. The team currently plays in the German first division women's Bundesliga.

UEFA Womens Champions League European association football tournament for clubs

The UEFA Women's Champions League, previously called the UEFA Women's Cup (2001–09), is an international women's association football competition. It involves the top club teams from countries affiliated with the European governing body UEFA.

For two seasons, Prinz joined Carolina Courage in the professional women's league WUSA in the United States. During her short stint in America she claimed the 2002 WUSA Championship. After the 2003 World Cup, Prinz declined an offer from AC Perugia to play in Italy's men's Serie A, fearing her transfer would be used as a publicity stunt and she would end up on the bench. [5]

Carolina Courage

Carolina Courage was a professional soccer team that played in the Women's United Soccer Association. The team played at Fetzer Field on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus in 2001, and then at the soccer-specific SAS Stadium in Cary, North Carolina in 2002 and 2003.

Womens United Soccer Association professional soccer league

The Women's United Soccer Association, often abbreviated to the WUSA, was the world's first women's soccer league in which all the players were paid as professionals. Founded in February 2000, the league began its first season in April 2001 with eight teams in the United States. The league suspended operations on September 15, 2003, shortly after the end of its third season, after making cumulative losses of around US$100 million.

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial championship of women's association football teams organized by FIFA. It was held in the United States from 20 September to 12 October 2003 at six venues in six cities across the country. The tournament was won by Germany, who became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup.

In her time at FFC Frankfurt, Prinz won many personal awards, including a record eight German Female Footballer of the Year awards from 2001 to 2008. [6] She was named the FIFA World Player of the Year in 2003, 2004 and 2005. For four consecutive years from 2007 to 2010 she came second, behind Brazil's Marta. [7]

International

At the age of 16, Prinz made her debut for Germany's national team in July 1994 against Canada. She came on after 72 minutes and scored the game-winner in the 89th minute. [8] One year later, she won her first major title at the 1995 European Championship, scoring in the final. In the same year, she was named to Germany's squad for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, where they lost to Norway in the final match. [2] She remains the youngest player ever to appear in a World Cup Final. [8]

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995. The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

1995 FIFA Womens World Cup 1995 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway. The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

For the next decade, Prinz had one of the most successful international careers in women's football. She won four more UEFA European Championships in 1997, 2001, 2005 and 2009. At the Summer Olympics she won bronze three times with the German team, in 2000, 2004 and 2008. At the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, Prinz helped Germany win its first World Cup title in the women's game. She was honoured as the tournament's best player and top-scorer. Prinz became the women's national team captain at the end of 2003, and remained until her retirement. Four years later, at the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, she captained the team to Germany's second World Cup title; she was awarded the Silver Ball as the second-best player at the tournament. [2]

UEFA Womens Championship European association football tournament for womens national teams

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro and unofficially the ‘European Cup’, held every fourth year, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA Confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

The 1997 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1997 was a football tournament held in 1997 in Norway and Sweden. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 2001 UEFA Women's Championship was the eighth UEFA Women's Championship, a competition for the women's national football teams and member associations of UEFA. It took place in Germany between 23 June and 7 July 2001. It was won by Germany with 1–0 in the final against Sweden, after a golden goal.

Prinz holds several national and international records. With 14 goals, she is the second all-time leading goalscorer at FIFA Women's World Cups. From 2008 until 2012, Prinz and Brazil's Cristiane both held the tournament record of 10 goals at the Summer Olympics, although Cristiane has now surpassed Prinz. For the German national team Prinz appeared 214 times and scored 128 goals, and is the team's most capped player and top goalscorer. [2]

Statistics at World Cup and Olympic Tournaments

Prinz competed in five FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995, USA 1999, USA 2003, China 2007; and Germany 2011; and four Olympics: Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000, Athens 2004, and Beijing 2008. Altogether she played in 43 matches and scored 24 goals at those nine global tournaments. [9] With Germany, Prinz is a two-time world champion from USA 2003 and China 2007, and a runner-up from Sweden 1995, as well as a three-time bronze medalist from Sydney 2000, Athens 2004 and Beijing 2008.

Key (expand for notes on “world cup and olympic goals”)
LocationGeographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
LineupStart – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
( c ) – captain

MinThe minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/passThe ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pkGoal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
ScoreThe match score after the goal was scored.
ResultThe final score.

W – match was won
L – match was lost to opponent
D – match was drawn
(W) – penalty-shoot-out was won after a drawn match
(L) – penalty-shoot-out was lost after a drawn match

aetThe score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Orange background color – Olympic women's football tournament
Blue background color – FIFA women's world cup final tournament
GoalMatchDateLocationOpponentLineupMinScoreResultCompetition
Flag of Sweden.svg Sweden 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup Final
11995-06-05 [m 1] Karlstad Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

on 65' (off Tecklenburg)

1–0 W

Group stage
21995-06-07 [m 2] Helsingborg Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

on 57' (off Brocker)

2–3 L

Group stage
131995-06-09 [m 3] Karlstad Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start51–0

6–1 W

Group stage
41995-06-13 [m 4] Västerås Flag of England.svg  England

off 67' (on Brocker)

3–0 W

Quarter-final
51995-06-15 [m 5] Helsingborg Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR

off 83' (on Wunderlich)

1–0 W

Semifinal
61995-06-18 [m 6] Solna Flag of Norway.svg  Norway

off 42' (on Brocker)

0–2 L

Final
Flag of the United States.svg Atlanta 1996 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
71996-07-21 [m 7] Birmingham, AL Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

on 53' (off Brocker)

3–2 W

Group match
281996-07-23 [m 8] Washington, D.C.Flag of Norway.svg  Norway

on 52' (off Brocker)

622–2

2–3 L

Group match
91996-07-25 [m 9] Birmingham, AL Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

on 42' (off Brocker)

1–1 D

Group match
Flag of the United States.svg USA 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup
101999-06-20 [m 10] Los AngelesFlag of Italy.svg  Italy Start

1–1 D

Group match
111999-06-24 [m 11] Portland, OR Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico

off 75' (on Mueller)

6–0 W

Group match
3121999-06-27 [m 12] Washington, D.C.Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start81–0

3–3 D

Group match
131999-07-01 [m 13] Washington, D.C.Flag of the United States.svg  United States Start

2–3 L

Quarter-final
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Sydney 2000 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
142000-09-13 [m 14] Canberra Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Start

3–0 W

Group match
4152000-09-16 [m 15] Canberra Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start331–0

2–1 W

Group match
5412–0
162000-09-19 [m 16] Melbourne Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start

1–0 W

Group match
172000-09-24 [m 17] SydneyFlag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

0–1 L

Semifinal
6182000-09-28 [m 18] SydneyFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start792–0

2–0 W

Bronze medal match
Flag of the United States.svg USA 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
7192003-09-20 [m 19] Columbus, OH Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Start753–1

4–1 W

Group match
8202003-09-24 [m 20] Columbus, OH Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Start362–0

3–0 W

Group match
9663–0
10212003-09-27 [m 21] Washington, D.C.Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Start323–0

6–1 W

Group match
11222003-10-02 [m 22] Portland, OR Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Start805–1

7–1 W

Quarter-final
12897–1
13232003-10-05 [m 23] Portland, OR Flag of the United States.svg  United States Start90+33–0

3–0 W

Semifinal
242003-10-12 [m 24] Carson, CA Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start

2–1 aet W

Final
Flag of Greece.svg Athens 2004 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
14252004-08-11 [m 25] Patras Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start131–0

8–0 W

Group match
15212–0
16734–0
17887–0
18262004-08-17 [m 26] Piraeus Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico Start; ( c )792–0

2–0 W

Group match
272004-08-20 [m 27] Patras Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Start; ( c )

2–1 W

Quarter-final
282004-08-23 [m 28] Heraklion Flag of the United States.svg  United States Start; ( c )

1–2 L

Semifinal
292004-08-26 [m 29] Piraeus Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start; ( c )

1–0 W

Bronze medal match
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg China 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
19302007-09-10 [m 30] ShanghaiFlag of Argentina.svg  Argentina Start; ( c )294–0

11–0 W

Group match
2045+15–0
21598–0
312007-09-14 [m 31] ShanghaiFlag of England.svg  England Start; ( c )

0–0 D

Group match
22322007-09-17 [m 32] Hangzhou Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Start; ( c )211–0

2–0 W

Group match
332007-09-22 [m 33] Wuhan Flag of North Korea.svg  Korea DPR Start; ( c )

3–0 W

Quarter-final
342007-09-26 [m 34] Tianjin Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start; ( c )

3–0 W

Semifinal
23352007-09-30 [m 35] ShanghaiFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start; ( c )521–0

2–0 W

Final
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Beijing 2008 Women's Olympic Football Tournament
362008-08-06 [m 36] Shenyang Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start; ( c )

0–0 D

Group match
372008-08-09 [m 37] Shenyang Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Start; ( c )

1–0 W

Group match
382008-08-12 [m 38] Tianjin Flag of North Korea.svg  Korea DPR Start; ( c )

1–0 W

Group match
392008-08-15 [m 39] Shenyang Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start; ( c )

2–0 aet W

Quarter-final
24402008-08-18 [m 40] ShanghaiFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start; ( c )101–0

1–4 L

Semifinal
412008-08-21 [m 41] BeijingFlag of Japan.svg  Japan Start; ( c )

2–0 W

Bronze medal match
Flag of Germany.svg Germany 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup
422011-06-26 [m 42] Berlin Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada

off 56' (on Popp); ( c )

2–1 W

Group match
432011-06-30 [m 43] Frankfurt Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria

off 53' (on Grings); ( c )

1–0 W

Group match

Private life

Prinz is a trained physical therapist. [10] In 2010, she graduated with her master's degree in psychology from the Goethe University Frankfurt. [11] Since January 2012, she has worked as a sport psychologist in the youth academy, women's U-17 and women's Bundesliga teams at TSG 1899 Hoffenheim. [12]

Honours

Club

FSV Frankfurt
1. FFC Frankfurt
Carolina Courage

International

Individual

See also

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References

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  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "Nationalspielerin Birgit Prinz" (in German). DFB.de. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  3. "Prinz announces end of career" (in German). sportschau.de. 12 August 2011. Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 12 August 2011.
  4. "Frauen: Prinz works and trains in Hoffenheim" (in German). 17 January 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  5. "Birgit Prinz sagt Perugia ab" (in German). netzeitung.de. 23 December 2010. Retrieved 5 February 2010.
  6. "Grings erneut Fußballerin des Jahres" (in German). DFB.de. 8 August 2010. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  7. "FIFA Ballon d'Or – Previous Editions". FIFA . Retrieved 22 June 2011.
  8. 1 2 "Birgit Prinz – Mittelpunkt des deutschen Angriffs" (in German). Focus.de. Retrieved 22 June 2011.
  9. "FIFA Player Statistics: Birgit Prinz". FIFA.
  10. "Birgit Prinz" (in German). birgitprinz.de. Archived from the original on 19 June 2010. Retrieved 5 February 2010.
  11. "Birgit Prinz: Für Ken und ganz Deutschland" (in German). SPOX.com. 10 June 2011. Retrieved 22 June 2011.
  12. "Schlee und Rauschenberger verlassen Hoffenheim" (in German). 18 June 2013. Archived from the original on 19 November 2015. Retrieved 18 June 2013.
Match reports
  1. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : Group matches". FIFA.
  2. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Sweden – Germany : Group matches". FIFA.
  3. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Brazil – Germany : Group matches". FIFA.
  4. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – England : Quarter-finals". FIFA.
  5. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – China PR : Semi-finals". FIFA.
  6. "FIFA Women's World Cup Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Germany – Norway : Final". FIFA.
  7. "Olympic Football Tournaments Atlanta 1996 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : First stage". FIFA.
  8. "Olympic Football Tournaments Atlanta 1996 – Women : MATCH Report: Norway – Germany : First stage". FIFA.
  9. "Olympic Football Tournaments Atlanta 1996 – Women : MATCH Report: Brazil – Germany : First stage". FIFA.
  10. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Germany – Italy : Group matches". FIFA.
  11. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Germany – Mexico : Group matches". FIFA.
  12. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : Group matches". FIFA.
  13. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Germany : Quarter-finals". FIFA.
  14. "Olympic Football Tournaments Sydney 2000 – Women : MATCH Report: Australia – Germany : First stage". FIFA.
  15. "Olympic Football Tournaments Sydney 2000 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : First stage". FIFA.
  16. "Olympic Football Tournaments Sydney 2000 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Sweden : First stage". FIFA.
  17. "Olympic Football Tournaments Sydney 2000 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Norway : Semi-finals". FIFA.
  18. "Olympic Football Tournaments Sydney 2000 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : Bronze medal match". FIFA.
  19. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Canada : Group matches". FIFA.
  20. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : Group matches". FIFA.
  21. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Argentinas – Germany : Group matches". FIFA.
  22. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Russia : Quarter-finals". FIFA.
  23. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – Germany : Semi-finals". FIFA.
  24. "FIFA Women's World Cup USA 2003: MATCH Report: Germany – Sweden : Final". FIFA.
  25. "Olympic Football Tournaments Athens 2004 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – China PR : First stage". FIFA.
  26. "Olympic Football Tournaments Athens 2004 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Mexico : First stage". FIFA.
  27. "Olympic Football Tournaments Athens 2004 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Nigeria : Quarter-finals". FIFA.
  28. "Olympic Football Tournaments Athens 2004 – Women : MATCH Report: USA – Germany : Semi-finals". FIFA.
  29. "Olympic Football Tournaments Athens 2004 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Sweden : Bronze medal match". FIFA.
  30. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Germany – Argentinas : First stage". FIFA.
  31. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: England – Germany : First stage". FIFA.
  32. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Germany – Japan : First stage". FIFA.
  33. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Germany – Korea DPR : Quarter-finals". FIFA.
  34. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Germany – Norway : Semi-finals". FIFA.
  35. "FIFA Women's World Cup China 2007: MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : Final". FIFA.
  36. "Olympic Football Tournaments Beijing 2008 – Women : MATCH Report: Germany – Brazil : First stage". FIFA.
  37. "Olympic Football Tournaments Beijing 2008 – Women : MATCH Report: Nigeria – Germany : First stage". FIFA.
  38. "Olympic Football Tournaments Beijing 2008 – Women : MATCH Report: Korea DPR – Germany : First stage". FIFA.
  39. "Olympic Football Tournaments Beijing 2008 – Women : MATCH Report: Sweden – Germany : Quarter-finals". FIFA.
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