Football at the Summer Olympics

Last updated
Football at the Summer Olympics
Football pictogram.svg
Governing body FIFA
Events2 (men: 1; women: 1)
Games

Tournaments (menwomen)

Football at the Summer Olympics, commonly known as football or soccer, has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

Contents

History

Before the first World Cup

Beginnings

Football was not included on the program at the first modern Olympic Games in 1896, as international football was in its infancy at the time. However, sources claim that an unofficial football tournament was organized during the first competition, in which an Athens XI lost to a team representing Smyrna (Izmir), then part of the Ottoman Empire. [1] According to a source, this is an error which has been perpetuated in multiple texts. [2]

Tournaments were played at the 1900 and 1904 games and the Intercalated Games of 1906, but these were contested by various clubs and scratch teams. Although the IOC considers the 1900 and 1904 tournaments to be official Olympic events, they are not recognized by FIFA, and neither recognizes the Intercalated Games today. In 1906 teams from Great Britain, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands and France withdrew from an unofficial competition and left Denmark, Smyrna (one Armenian, two Frenchmen and eight Britons), Athens and Thessaloniki to compete. Denmark won the final against Athens 9–0.

British successes

In the London Games of 1908 a proper international tournament was organised by the Football Association, featuring just six teams. The number of teams rose to eleven in 1912, when the competition was organised by the Swedish Football Association. Many of these early matches were unbalanced, as evidenced by high scoring games; two players, Sophus Nielsen in 1908 and Gottfried Fuchs in 1912, each scored ten goals in a single match. All players were amateurs, in accordance with the Olympic spirit, which meant that some countries could not send their full international team. The National Olympic Committee for Great Britain and Ireland asked the Football Association to send an English national amateur team. Some of the English members played with professional clubs, most notably Derby County's Ivan Sharpe, Bradford City F.C. Harold Walden and Chelsea's Vivian Woodward. England won the first two official tournaments convincingly, beating Denmark both times.

1920s and the rise of Uruguay

The Uruguay national football team that won the 1928 Olympic tournament Uruguay 1928 olympics.jpg
The Uruguay national football team that won the 1928 Olympic tournament

During the 1920 final, the Czechoslovakia national football team walked from the field of play in order to raise awareness of their displeasure regarding the refereeing of John Lewis and the militarised mood within the stadium in Antwerp. In the 1924 and 1928 Olympic games, the first South American teams entered the competition: Uruguay and Argentina. Uruguay won both Olympics and FIFA became conscious that the Olympic movement was not only hindering the ability of nations to participate on an equal footing but, given that the Olympics only permitted amateurs to participate, did not represent the true strength of the international game.

After the first World Cup

Tumultuous 30s

Following Henri Delaunay's proposal in 1929 to initiate a professional World Championship of Football, the sport was dropped from the 1932 Los Angeles Games by FIFA in an attempt to promote the new tournament. Football returned to controversy at the 1936 Berlin Games. The German organisers were intent on the return of the game to the Olympic movement since it guaranteed income into the organisation's coffers. The Italian team intimidated a referee. Peru scored a contested victory over Austria in overtime, with a fan invasion of the field at the very end. The Austrian team asked for the result to be annulled, and the game repeated. FIFA agreed, but the Peruvian team refused and left the Olympics. [3] [4]

Soviet Bloc dominance amid shamateurism controversy

As professionalism spread around the world, the gap in quality between the World Cup and the Olympics widened. The countries that benefited most were the Soviet Bloc countries of Eastern Europe, where top athletes were state-sponsored while retaining their status as amateurs. As a result, young Western amateurs had to face seasoned and veteran Soviet Bloc teams, which put them at a significant disadvantage. All Olympic football tournaments from 1948 to 1992 were dominated by the Soviet Union and its satellites. [5] Between 1948 and 1980, 23 out of 28 Olympic medals were won by Eastern Europe, with only Sweden (gold in 1948 and bronze in 1952), Denmark (bronze in 1948 and silver in 1960) and Japan (bronze in 1968) breaking their dominance.

Changes and developments

For the 1984 Los Angeles Games, the IOC decided to admit professional players. FIFA still did not want the Olympics to rival the World Cup, so a compromise was struck that allowed teams from countries outside of UEFA and CONMEBOL to field their strongest sides, while restricting UEFA and CONMEBOL (the strongest confederations whose teams won every single World Cup title) countries to players who had not played in a World Cup.

Age limit

Since 1992 male competitors must be under 23 years old, and since 1996, players under 23 years old, with three over-23 year old players, are allowed per squad. African countries have taken particular advantage of this, with Nigeria and Cameroon winning in 1996 and 2000 respectively.

Because of the unusual format, several of the historically strongest men's national teams have unimpressive Olympic records. Uruguay won the tournament in their first two attempts, in 1924 and 1928, their only appearances before they qualified for the 2012 edition, after an 84-year absence. Argentina won silver twice (1928 and 1996) before the 2004 tournament, but its appearance in Athens, in which it won the first gold medal (the second was won in Beijing in 2008), was only their seventh overall (the eighth has been in 2016). Brazil's silver medals in the 1984, 1988 and 2012 editions were the best they had achieved until 2016's gold, and since professional athletes were allowed to compete, they failed to qualify in 1992 and 2004. Italy has only won the Olympic title once, in 1936, although it has also won two bronzes, and has the highest number of appearances in the tournament, at 15, with their last qualify in 2008. France has won the Olympic title only once (in 1984) and has failed to qualify since 1996. Germany's best result (before 2016 edition) was a single bronze medal, in 1988 (as West Germany), and the reunified team did not make an Olympic appearance until 2016, where they won silver. Spain has won the gold medal only once, in 1992. It has also won 2 silver medals (in 1920 and 2000) but has failed to qualify several times.

Addition of women's program

The IOC approved the addition of women's association football as a permanent Olympic event in September 1993, setting an eight-team tournament for the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. [6] The 1996 tournament, which came shortly after the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup was organized in 1991, [7] set a record for the largest crowd to see a women's sports event, at 76,481 during the United StatesChina final. [8] The women's tournament uses the senior national teams with no age restrictions, unlike the men's tournament. Therefore, the value of the women's tournament is the same as with the Women's World Cup.

British non-involvement

Football in the United Kingdom has no single governing body, and there are separate teams for the UK's four Home Nations: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Only the English Football Association (FA) is affiliated to the British Olympic Association (BOA), and the FA entered "Great Britain" teams to the football tournaments until 1972. In 1974, the FA abolished the distinction between "amateur" and "professional" football, and stopped entering the Olympics. Even though FIFA has allowed professionals at the Olympics since 1984, the FA did not re-enter, as the Home Nations feared that a united British Olympic team would set a precedent that might cause FIFA to question their separate status in other FIFA competitions and on the International Football Association Board. [9] [10]

When London was selected to host the 2012 Games, there was pressure on the English FA to exercise the host nation's automatic right to field a team. [11] In 2009 the plan agreed by the FA with the Welsh FA, Scottish FA and Irish FA was only to field English players; [12] however the BOA overruled this, [13] and ultimately there were Welsh players in the men's squad and Scots in the women's squad. [14] [15] After the 2012 games, the FA decided that no team would be entered in subsequent men's tournaments, but was open to fielding a women's team again. [16]

For the 2020 tournament, FIFA stated that women's UK team (not applied to men's UK team) may enter the Olympics after the four FAs agreed, depending on the performance of women's English team in 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup (which serves as the European qualification for the Olympics). [17] [18]

Venues

Due to the number of large stadia required for the Olympic tournament, venues in distant cities – often more than 200 km (120 mi) away from the main host – are typically used for the football tournament. In an extreme example, two early-round venues for the 1984 Games were on the East Coast of the United States, well over 2,000 miles (3,200 km) from the host city of Los Angeles. The next Games held in the United States, the 1996 Games, were unique in that no matches were held in the host city of Atlanta; the nearest venue and the site of the finals was 65 miles (105 km) away on the University of Georgia campus in Athens. Counting the 2012 and 2016 Summer Olympics, there are 121 venues that have hosted Olympic football, the most of any sport.

Edition of the Olympic GamesCityStadium
Flag of Greece (1822-1978).svg Athens 1896 No football tournament
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg Paris 1900 Paris Vélodrome de Vincennes
Flag of the United States (1896-1908).svg Saint Louis 1904 St. Louis, Missouri Francis Field
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg London 1908 London White City Stadium
Flag of Sweden.svg Stockholm 1912 Stockholm Stockholms Olympiastadion
Råsunda Stadium
Tranebergs Idrottsplats
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Antwerp 1920 Antwerp Olympisch Stadion
Stadion Broodstraat
Brussels Stade de l'Union St. Gilloise
Ghent Stade d'A.A. La Gantoise
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg Paris 1924 Paris Stade Olympique, Colombes
Stade Bergeyre
Stade de Paris, Saint-Ouen
Stade Pershing, Vincennes
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Amsterdam 1928 Amsterdam Olympisch Stadion
Harry Elte Stadium
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Los Angeles 1932 No football tournament
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg Berlin 1936 Berlin Olympiastadion
Poststadion, Tiergarten
Mommsenstadion, Charlottenburg
Hertha-BSC-Platz
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg London 1948 London Empire Stadium, Wembley
White Hart Lane, Tottenham
Selhurst Park, Crystal Palace
Craven Cottage, Fulham
Griffin Park, Brentford
Arsenal Stadium, Highbury
Lynn Road Stadium, Ilford
Green Pond Road Stadium, Walthamstow
Champion Hill, Dulwich
Brighton Goldstone Ground
Portsmouth Fratton Park
Flag of Finland.svg Helsinki 1952 Helsinki Olympiastadion
Töölö Football Grounds
Turku Kupittaa Stadium
Tampere Ratina Stadion
Lahti Kisapuisto
Kotka Kotka Stadion
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Melbourne 1956 Melbourne Melbourne Cricket Ground
Olympic Park Stadium
Flag of Italy.svg Rome 1960 Rome Stadio Flaminio
Florence Stadio Comunale
Grosseto Stadio Comunale
Livorno Stadio Ardenza
Pescara Stadio Adriatico
L'Aquila Stadio Comunale
Naples Stadio Fuorigrotta
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Tokyo 1964 Tokyo National Olympic Stadium
Prince Chichibu Memorial Field
Komazawa Stadium
Ōmiya Omiya Soccer Stadium
Yokohama Mitsuzawa Football Stadium
Flag of Mexico.svg Mexico City 1968 Mexico City Estadio Azteca
Puebla Estadio Cuauhtémoc
Guadalajara Estadio Jalisco
León Estadio León
Flag of Germany.svg Munich 1972 Munich Olympiastadion
Augsburg Rosenaustadion
Ingolstadt ESV-Stadion
Regensburg Jahnstadion
Nuremberg Städtisches Stadion
Passau Drei Flüsse Stadion
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal 1976 Montreal Olympic Stadium
Sherbrooke Municipal Stadium
Toronto Varsity Stadium
Ottawa Lansdowne Stadium
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Moscow 1980 Moscow Lenin Stadium
Dynamo Stadium
Leningrad Kirov Stadium
Kiev Republican Stadium
Minsk Dinamo Stadium
Flag of the United States.svg Los Angeles 1984 Pasadena, California Rose Bowl
Boston, Massachusetts Harvard Stadium
Annapolis, Maryland Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium
Stanford, California Stanford Stadium
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg Seoul 1988 Seoul Seoul Olympic Stadium
Dongdaemun Stadium
Busan Busan Stadium
Daegu Daegu Stadium
Daejeon Daejeon Stadium
Gwangju Gwangju Stadium
Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 1992 Barcelona Camp Nou
Estadi de Sarrià
Sabadell Estadi de la Nova Creu Alta
Zaragoza Estadio La Romareda
Valencia Estadio Luis Casanova
Flag of the United States.svg Atlanta 1996 Athens, Georgia Sanford Stadium
Orlando, Florida Citrus Bowl
Birmingham, Alabama Legion Field
Miami, Florida Miami Orange Bowl
Washington, D.C. Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Sydney 2000 Sydney Olympic Stadium
Sydney Football Stadium
Brisbane Brisbane Cricket Ground
Adelaide Hindmarsh Stadium
Canberra Bruce Stadium
Melbourne Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG)
Flag of Greece.svg Athens 2004 Athens Athens Olympic Stadium
Karaiskakis Stadium
Patras Pampeloponnisiako Stadium
Volos Panthessaliko Stadium
Thessaloniki Kaftanzoglio Stadium
Heraklion Pankritio Stadium
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Beijing 2008 Beijing Beijing National Stadium
Workers Stadium
Tianjin Tianjin Olympic Center Stadium
Shanghai Shanghai Stadium
Qinhuangdao Qinhuangdao Olympic Sports Center Stadium
Shenyang Shenyang Olympic Sports Center Stadium
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg London 2012 London Wembley Stadium
Glasgow Hampden Park
Cardiff Millennium Stadium
Coventry City of Coventry Stadium*
Manchester Old Trafford
Newcastle upon Tyne St James' Park*
Flag of Brazil.svg Rio 2016 Rio de Janeiro Estádio do Maracanã
Estádio Olímpico João Havelange
São Paulo Arena Corinthians
Brasília Estádio Nacional Mané Garrincha
Salvador Arena Fonte Nova*
Belo Horizonte Estádio Mineirão
Manaus Arena da Amazônia
Flag of Japan.svg Tokyo 2020 Tokyo Olympic Stadium
Tokyo Stadium
Yokohama International Stadium Yokohama
Saitama Saitama Stadium 2002
Miyagi Miyagi Stadium
Sapporo Sapporo Dome

Events

Event96 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 32 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Men's event X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 27
Women's event X X X X X X X 7
Total01111111011111111111112222222

Competition format

For both the men's and women's tournaments, the competition consists of a round-robin group stage followed by a knockout stage. Teams are placed into groups of 4 teams, with each team playing each other team in its group once. Teams earn 3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, and 0 points for a loss. The top two teams in each group (as well as the top two third-place finishers, in the women's tournament) advance to the knockout rounds. The knockout rounds are a single-elimination tournament consisting of quarterfinals, semifinals, and the gold and bronze medal matches.

Matches consist of two halves of 45 minutes each. Since 2004, during the knockout rounds, if the match is tied after 90 minutes, two 15-minute halves of extra time are played (extra time is skipped in favor of immediate penalty kicks in the bronze medal match if it is played on the same day in the same stadium as the gold medal match). If the score remains tied, penalty kicks, which is 5 rounds, plus extra rounds if tied, are used to determine the winner. [19]

Men's tournament

Men's Olympic Football Tournament
Founded1900 [20]
RegionInternational (FIFA)
Number of teams16 (from 6 confederations)
Current championsFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil
(1st title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
(3 titles each)
Soccerball current event.svg 2020 Summer Olympics

The qualifying tournament, like that for the World Cup, is organised along continental lines. Most continental confederations organise a special Under-23 qualifying tournament, although the European qualifiers are drawn from the finalists of the UEFA Under-21 Championship and South American qualifiers from the South American Youth Championship, which is a U-20 tournament. Teams participating in the preliminary and final competitions must be composed of U-23 players, with up to three players who are at least 23. For Tokyo 2020, U-23 players are born after 1 January 1997. [21]

For the 2020 Games, the number of places allocated to each continent is:

Participating nations

Numbers refer to the final placing of each team at the respective Games.

UEFA
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 62=11=54
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 101
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 3115=545
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 10=173525
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 141
Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 99291Split into Slovakia and Czech Republic5
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 22103=5261389
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany [22] 3312Merged with West Germany4
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia =171
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 4=9=1494
Flag of France.svg  France 2545=9=5=1797515Q13
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany [23] 7=5=64=95532Q10
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11111=64=17=58510
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 13=17153
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 513=913112169
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 7=172
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Competed with Asia (qualified 2 times)2
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 85631=5=944451253515
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 161
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania =171
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 1211=9=9=9=96
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3334=9=9=1778
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 973=14105
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland =174=9101227
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal =541464
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 14=175Q4
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 101
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia 121
Flag of Serbia and Montenegro.svg  Serbia and Montenegro 16Split into 2 nations1
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 131
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union =913331Split into 15 nations6
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 2=17=56121016214Q11
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 41163=913661510
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 2=9133
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey =17=9=9=5=5146
Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia 9=17=9222164310Split into 7 nations11
CONMEBOL
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2710821111Q9
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil =569131342237321Q14
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 17=17734
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 1011111465
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 722
Flag of Peru.svg  Peru 5112
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 1193
Flag of Venezuela.svg  Venezuela 121
CONCACAF
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 11363
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 161383
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 1172
Flag of El Salvador.svg  El Salvador 151
Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 810163
Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 1016744
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico =9=1111479107=101911
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Antilles =14Split into 2 n.1
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2 [24] 312=9=9=11=17=5149129104914
CAF
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Algeria.svg  Algeria 8142
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 11183
Flag of Egypt.svg  Egypt 884=9=11=91248128Q12
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 6Q2
Flag of Gabon.svg  Gabon 121
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 712163896
Flag of Guinea.svg  Guinea 111
Flag of Mali.svg  Mali 51
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 138121516=10117
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 14131518237
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 61
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 1113Q3
Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 151
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 151314124
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 1552
AFC
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan =171
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia Competed with Oceania (qualified 6 times)11Q2
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 14132
Flag of Chinese Taipei for Olympic games.svg  Chinese Taipei =9=11163
Flag of India.svg  India =11=174134
Flag of Indonesia.svg  Indonesia =51
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 121273
Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq 51494125
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 56Competed with Europe2
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan =6=983961315410Q11
Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 616123
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 101
Flag of Myanmar.svg  Myanmar 91
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 81
Flag of Qatar.svg  Qatar 1582
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 1615Q3
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea =514111111961035Q11
Flag of Syria.svg  Syria 141
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand =9162
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg  United Arab Emirates 151
OFC
Nation 00 04 08 12 20 24 28 36 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia =57413157AFC (qualified 2 times)6
Flag of Fiji.svg  Fiji 161
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1416Q3
Total nations325111422171618251116141616131616161616161616161616

Results

EditionYearHostsGold medal matchBronze medal match
Gold medalistsScoreSilver medalistsBronze medalistsScoreFourth place
1896 Flag of Greece (1822-1978).svg
Athens
No football tournament
11900
Details
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg
Paris
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
(Upton Park F.C.)
[25] Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg
France
(Club Français)
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
(ULB)
[25] Three teams entered
21904
Details
Flag of the United States (1896-1908).svg
St. Louis
Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg
Canada
(Galt F.C.)
[26] Flag of the United States (1896-1908).svg
United States
(Christian Bro. College)
Flag of the United States (1896-1908).svg
United States
(St. Rose Parish)
[26] Three teams entered
31908
Details
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
London
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
2–0Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
2–0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
41912
Details
Flag of Sweden.svg
Stockholm
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
4–2Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
9–0 Flag of The Russian Empire 1883.svg
Finland
51920
Details
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Antwerp
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
[27] Flag of Spain (1785-1873, 1875-1931).svg
Spain
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
[27] Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg
France
61924
Details
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg
Paris
Flag of Uruguay.svg
Uruguay
3–0Flag of Switzerland.svg
Switzerland
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
1–1
aet
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
Match replay: 3–1
71928
Details
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Amsterdam
Flag of Uruguay.svg
Uruguay
1–1
aet
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg
Italy
11–3Flag of Egypt (1922-1958).svg
Egypt
Match replay: 2–1
1932 Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg
Los Angeles
No football tournament
81936
Details
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg
Berlin
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg
Italy
2–1
aet
Flag of Austria.svg
Austria
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
3–2Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg
Poland
91948
Details
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
London
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
3–1Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg
Yugoslavia
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
5–3 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
Great Britain
101952
Details
Flag of Finland.svg
Helsinki
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg
Hungary
2–0Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg
Yugoslavia
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
2–0 Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
111956
Details
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Melbourne
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Soviet Union
1–0Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg
Yugoslavia
Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg
Bulgaria
3–0Flag of India.svg
India
121960
Details
Flag of Italy.svg
Rome
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg
Yugoslavia
3–1Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
Flag of Hungary.svg
Hungary
2–1Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
131964
Details
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Tokyo
Flag of Hungary.svg
Hungary
2–1Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czechoslovakia
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany [22]
3–1Flag of the United Arab Republic.svg
United Arab Republic
141968
Details
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico City
Flag of Hungary.svg
Hungary
4–1Flag of Bulgaria (1967-1971).svg
Bulgaria
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg
Japan
2–0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
151972
Details
Flag of Germany.svg
Munich
Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg
Poland
2–1Flag of Hungary.svg
Hungary
Flag of East Germany.svg
East Germany
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Soviet Union
2–2 [28]
aet
161976
Details
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Montreal
Flag of East Germany.svg
East Germany
3–1Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg
Poland
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Soviet Union
2–0Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg
Brazil
171980
Details
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Moscow
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czechoslovakia
1–0Flag of East Germany.svg
East Germany
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Soviet Union
2–0Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg
Yugoslavia
181984
Details
Flag of the United States.svg
Los Angeles
Flag of France.svg
France
2–0Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg
Brazil
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg
Yugoslavia
2–1Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
191988
Details
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg
Seoul
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Soviet Union
2–1
aet
Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg
Brazil
Flag of Germany.svg
West Germany
3–0Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
201992
Details
Flag of Spain.svg
Barcelona
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
3–2Flag of Poland.svg
Poland
Flag of Ghana.svg
Ghana
1–0Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia
211996
Details
Flag of the United States.svg
Atlanta
Flag of Nigeria.svg
Nigeria
3–2Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
5–0Flag of Portugal.svg
Portugal
222000
Details
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Sydney
Flag of Cameroon.svg
Cameroon
2–2
asdet
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of Chile.svg
Chile
2–0Flag of the United States.svg
United States
5–3 on penalty shoot-out
232004
Details
Flag of Greece.svg
Athens
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
1–0Flag of Paraguay.svg
Paraguay
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
1–0Flag of Iraq (2004-2008).svg
Iraq
242008
Details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Beijing
Flag of Argentina.svg
Argentina
1–0Flag of Nigeria.svg
Nigeria
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
3–0Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
252012
Details
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
London
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
2–1Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Flag of South Korea.svg
South Korea
2–0Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
262016
Details
Flag of Brazil.svg
Rio de Janeiro
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
1–1
aet
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Nigeria.svg
Nigeria
3–2Flag of Honduras.svg
Honduras
5–4 on penalty shoot-out
272020
Details
Flag of Japan.svg
Tokyo

* Under-23 tournament since 1992.

Performances by countries

Below are the 41 nations that have reached at least the semi-final stage in the Summer Olympics finals.

TeamGold medalsSilver medalsBronze medalsFourth placeMedals
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 3 (1952, 1964, 1968)1 (1972)1 (1960)5
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 3 (1900, 1908, 1912)1 (1948)3
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2 (2004, 2008)2 (1928, 1996)4
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 2 (1956, 1988)3 (1972, 1976, 1980)5
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 2 (1924, 1928)2
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1 (2016)3 (1984, 1988, 2012)2 (1996, 2008)1 (1976)6
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 1 (1960)3 (1948, 1952, 1956)1 (1984)1 (1980)5
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 1 (1972)2 (1976, 1992)1 (1936)3
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 1 (1992)2 (1920, 2000)3
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 1 (1976)1 (1980)1 (1972)3
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 1 (1996)1 (2008)1 (2016)3
Flag of France.svg  France 1 (1984)1 (1900)1 (1920)2
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 1 (1980)1 (1964)2
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 1 (1936)2 (1928, 2004)3 (1960, 1984, 1988)3
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (1948)2 (1924, 1952)1 (1908)3
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 1 (1920)1 (1900)1 (2008)2
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 1 (2012)1 (1968)1
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1 (1904)1
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 1 (2000)1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 3 (1908, 1912, 1960)1 (1948)4
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1 (1904)1 (1904)1 (2000)2
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 1 (1968)1 (1956)2
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1 (2016)1 (1952)1
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 1 (1924)1
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 1 (1936)1
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 1 (2004)1
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3 (1908, 1912, 1920)1 (1924)3
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1 (1968)1 (2012)1
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1 (1936)1
Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany 1 (1964)1
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 1 (1988)1
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 1 (1992)1
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 1 (2000)1
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 1 (2012)1
Flag of Egypt.svg  Egypt 2 (1928, 1964)0
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 1 (1912)0
Flag of India.svg  India 1 (1956)0
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1 (1992)0
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 1 (1996)0
Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq 1 (2004)0
Flag of Honduras.svg  Honduras 1 (2016)0

Top scorers by tournament

YearPlayerGoals
1900 Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg Gaston Peltier
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg John Nicholas
2
1904 Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg Alexander Hall
Canadian Red Ensign (1868-1921).svg Tom Taylor
3
1908 Flag of Denmark.svg Sophus Nielsen 11
1912 Flag of the German Empire.svg Gottfried Fuchs 10
1920 Flag of Sweden.svg Herbert Karlsson 7
1924 Flag of Uruguay.svg Pedro Petrone 7
1928 Flag of Argentina.svg Domingo Tarasconi 9
1936 Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Annibale Frossi 7
1948 Flag of Denmark.svg John Hansen
Flag of Sweden.svg Gunnar Nordahl
7
1952 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Rajko Mitić
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Branko Zebec
7
1956 Flag of India.svg Neville D'Souza
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Todor Veselinović
Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg Dimitar Milanov
4
1960 Flag of Denmark.svg Harald Nielsen 8
1964 Flag of Hungary.svg Ferenc Bene 12
1968 Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg Kunishige Kamamoto 7
1972 Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg Kazimierz Deyna 9
1976 Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg Andrzej Szarmach 6
1980 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Sergey Andreyev 5
1984 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Borislav Cvetković
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Stjepan Deverić
Flag of France.svg Daniel Xuereb
5
1988 Flag of Brazil (1968-1992).svg Romario 7
1992 Flag of Poland.svg Andrzej Juskowiak 7
1996 Flag of Brazil.svg Bebeto
Flag of Argentina.svg Hernán Crespo
6
2000 Flag of Chile.svg Iván Zamorano 6
2004 Flag of Argentina.svg Carlos Tevez 8
2008 Flag of Italy.svg Giuseppe Rossi 4
2012 Flag of Brazil.svg Leandro Damião 6
2016 Flag of Germany.svg Serge Gnabry
Flag of Germany.svg Nils Petersen
6

Records

Denmark's Sophus Nielsen and Hungary's Antal Dunai share the record for the most goals scored by a player in the tournament history, both with 13 goals, since the first official football tournament held in London, England, 1908; with Nielsen scoring 11 goals in 1908, and 2 in 1912, and Dunai scoring 6 in 1968 and 7 in 1972. Ferenc Bene holds the record for the most goals scored by a player in a single Olympics tournament, scoring 12 goals in the 1964 edition. Sophus Nielson also shares with Gottfried Fuchs the record of most goals in a single Olympics game, both with 10, with Nielson achieving that in the semi-final match against France in 1908, and Fuchs in the 1 round match against Russia in 1912 Consolation tournament.

Neymar marked the fastest goal in a men's Olympic football match in history at 14 seconds in the semi-final match against Honduras on 17 August 2016. [29]

All-time top scorers

The all-time top goalscorers with at least 7 goals (since 1908)

RankNameTeamGoals
1 Flag of Denmark.svg Sophus Nielsen Denmark 13
Flag of Hungary.svg Antal Dunai Hungary 13
3 Flag of Hungary.svg Ferenc Bene Hungary 12
4 Flag of Argentina.svg Domingo Tarasconi Argentina 11
Flag of Uruguay.svg Pedro Petrone Uruguay 11
6 Flag of the German Empire.svg Gottfried Fuchs Germany 10
Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg Kazimierz Deyna Poland 10
8 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Harold Walden Great Britain 9
Flag of Denmark.svg Vilhelm Wolfhagen Denmark 9
10 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jan Vos Netherlands 8
Flag of Uruguay.svg Hector Scarone Uruguay 8
Flag of Argentina.svg Carlos Tevez Argentina 8
Flag of Brazil.svg Bebeto Brazil 8
Flag of Denmark.svg Harald Nielsen Denmark 8
Flag of Egypt.svg Ibrahim Reyadh Egypt 8
15 Flag of Denmark.svg John Hansen Denmark 7
Flag of Denmark.svg Anthon Olsen Denmark 7
Flag of Sweden.svg Gunnar Nordahl Sweden 7
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg Annibale Frossi Italy 7
Flag of Denmark.svg Vilhelm Wolfhagen Denmark 7
Flag of Sweden.svg Herbert Carlsson Sweden 7
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Branko Zebec Yugoslavia 7
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Milan Galić Yugoslavia 7
Flag of Japan.svg Kunishige Kamamoto Japan 7
Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg Andrzej Juskowiak Poland 7
Flag of Brazil.svg Romario Brazil 7
Flag of Brazil.svg Neymar Brazil 7

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary  (HUN)3115
2Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)3003
3Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina  (ARG)2204
4Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)2035
5Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay  (URU)2002
6Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)1326
7Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia  (YUG)1315
8Flag of Poland.svg  Poland  (POL)1203
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)1203
10Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)1113
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria  (NGR)1113
12Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)1102
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)1102
14Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)1023
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)1023
16Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium  (BEL)1012
17Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon  (CMR)1001
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada  (CAN)1001
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico  (MEX)1001
20Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark  (DEN)0314
21Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria  (BUL)0112
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)0112
23Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)0101
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)0101
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay  (PAR)0101
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)0101
27Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands  (NED)0033
28Flag of Chile.svg  Chile  (CHI)0011
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana  (GHA)0011
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)0011
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)0011
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea  (KOR)0011
Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany  (EUA)0011
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany  (FRG)0011
Totals (34 nations)26262779

Women's tournament

Women's Olympic Football Tournament
Founded1996
RegionInternational (FIFA)
Number of teams12 (from 6 confederations)
Current championsFlag of Germany.svg  Germany
(1st title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of the United States.svg  United States
(4 titles)
Soccerball current event.svg 2020 Summer Olympics

The women's tournament is contested between full national sides, with no age restrictions. One place is reserved for the host country. Of the remaining teams, as in World Cup contests a specific number of places are reserved for teams from each continental region; the European (UEFA) teams are chosen from the most successful European teams in the previous year's World Cup, whilst the other continental regions host their own qualifying tournaments in the build-up to the Olympics.

The first women's tournament was at the 1996 Atlanta Games. The United States won the gold medal, and picked up silver in 2000 after a golden goal loss to Norway. The finals of the next two tournaments, in 2004 and 2008, also went to extra time, with the U.S. defeating Brazil both times. In 2012 the U.S. won their fourth gold medal defeating Japan 2–1 in the final. In 2016 Germany won its first gold, defeating Sweden in the final.

Allocation of places for each continent in the 2020 Games is:

Participating nations

Numbers refer to the final placing of each team at the respective Games. Host nation is shown in bold.

Nation 96 00 04 08 12 16 20 Years
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina =111
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 757Q4
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 442264Q7
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 121
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 833Q4
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 259585
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 11112
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 81
Flag of France.svg  France 462
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 533315
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 5Q2
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 101
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 7742Q5
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 81
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Q1
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1089Q4
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 86=113
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 992
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 3173
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 10102
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 664672Q7
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 121115Q7
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia Q1
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 121
Total nations881012121212

Results

EditionYearHostsGold medal matchBronze medal match
Gold medalistsScoreSilver medalistsBronze medalistsScoreFourth place
11996
Details
Flag of the United States.svg
Atlanta
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2–1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
2–0Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
22000
Details
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Sydney
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
3–2
asdet
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–0Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
32004
Details
Flag of Greece.svg
Athens
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2–1
aet
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
1–0Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
42008
Details
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
Beijing
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1–0
aet
Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–0Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
52012
Details
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg
London
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2–1Flag of Japan.svg
Japan
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
1–0Flag of France.svg
France
62016
Details
Flag of Brazil.svg
Rio de Janeiro
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2–1Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2–1Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
72020
Details
Flag of Japan.svg
Tokyo

Performances by countries

Below are the 9 nations that have reached at least the semi-final stage in the Summer Olympics finals.

TeamGold medalsSilver medalsBronze medalsFourth placeMedals
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 4 (1996, 2004, 2008, 2012)1 (2000)5
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1 (2016)3 (2000, 2004, 2008)4
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1 (2000)1 (1996)2
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2 (2004, 2008)3 (1996, 2000, 2016)2
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1 (2012)1 (2008)1
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1 (2016)1 (2004)1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1 (1996)1
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2 (2012, 2016)2
Flag of France.svg  France 1 (2012)0

Top scorers by tournament

YearPlayerGoals
1996 Flag of Norway.svg Ann Kristin Aarønes
Flag of Norway.svg Linda Medalen
Flag of Brazil.svg Pretinha
4
2000 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Sun Wen 4
2004 Flag of Brazil.svg Cristiane
Flag of Germany.svg Birgit Prinz
5
2008 Flag of Brazil.svg Cristiane 5
2012 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Christine Sinclair 6
2016 Flag of Germany.svg Melanie Behringer 5

All-time top scorers

The all-time top goalscorers with at least 5 goals (1996–2016)

14 goals
11 goals
10 goals
9 goals
8 goals
7 goals
6 goals
5 goals

Medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)4105
2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)1034
3Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)1012
4Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)0202
5Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)0101
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)0101
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0101
8Flag of Canada.svg  Canada  (CAN)0022
Totals (8 nations)66618

Overall medal table

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)4217
2Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary  (HUN)3115
3Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)3003
4Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina  (ARG)2204
5Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union  (URS)2035
6Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay  (URU)2002
7Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)1528
8Flag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia  (YUG)1315
9Flag of Poland.svg  Poland  (POL)1203
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)1203
11Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)1135
12Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)1124
13Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany  (GDR)1113
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria  (NGR)1113
15Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia  (TCH)1102
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)1102
17Flag of Canada.svg  Canada  (CAN)1023
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)1023
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)1023
20Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium  (BEL)1012
21Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon  (CMR)1001
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico  (MEX)1001
23Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark  (DEN)0314
24Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria  (BUL)0112
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)0112
26Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)0101
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)0101
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay  (PAR)0101
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)0101
30Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands  (NED)0033
31Flag of Chile.svg  Chile  (CHI)0011
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana  (GHA)0011
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea  (KOR)0011
Flag of the German Olympic Team (1960-1968).svg  United Team of Germany  (EUA)0011
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany  (FRG)0011
Totals (35 nations)32323397

See also

Related Research Articles

FIFA World Cup Association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

United States womens national soccer team Womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States women's national soccer team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning four Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic gold medals, and eight CONCACAF Gold Cups. It medaled in every World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Uruguay national football team mens national association football team representing Uruguay

The Uruguay national football team represents Uruguay in international football, and is controlled by the Uruguayan Football Association, the governing body for football in Uruguay. The current head coach is Óscar Tabárez. The Uruguayan team is commonly referred to as La Celeste . They have won the Copa América 15 times, the most successful national team in the tournament, the most recent title being the 2011 edition. The team has won the FIFA World Cup twice, including the first World Cup in 1930 as hosts, defeating Argentina 4–2 in the final. They won their second title in 1950, upsetting host Brazil 2–1 in the final match, which received an attendance higher than any football match ever.

No United Kingdom national football team exists, as there are separate teams representing each of the nations of the United Kingdom in international football.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Japan womens national football team Womens national association football team representing Japan

The Japan women's national football team, or Nadeshiko Japan (なでしこジャパン), represents Japan in women's association football and is run by the Japan Football Association (JFA). It is the most successful women's national team from the Asian Football Confederation. Its highest ranking in the FIFA Women's World Rankings is 3rd, achieved in December 2011.

This page indexes the individual year in association football pages. Each year is annotated with one or more significant events as a reference point.

Football at the 2012 Summer Olympics 2012 edition of the association football torunaments during the Olympic Summer Games

The association football tournament at the 2012 Summer Olympics was held from 25 July to 11 August, and was the only sport to begin before the official opening day of the Olympic Games, two days before the opening ceremony. It was also the only sport to be held at multiple venues outside London, with Manchester, Glasgow, Newcastle, Coventry and Cardiff all hosting matches. The finals were played at Wembley Stadium. Associations affiliated with FIFA were invited to send their senior women's and men's under-23 national teams to participate; men's teams were allowed to augment their squads with three players over the age of 23. Five hundred and four football players competed for two sets of gold medals.

Netherlands at the 2008 Summer Olympics

The Netherlands competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, People's Republic of China. This was announced in an official statement on the NOC*NSF website. In the statement they named the Olympic Games and the Paralympic Games as a highlight in sports to which a lot of sportspeople, coaches and the Dutch sports fans would look forward. The Netherlands aimed for a top 10 nations ranking in the Olympics as well as a top 25 ranking in the Paralympics; they ended up ranking 12th at the Games.

Argentina national under-23 football team national association football team

The Argentina Olympic football team represents Argentina in international football competitions in the Olympic Games. The selection is limited to players under the age of 23, except three overage players. The team is controlled by the Argentine Football Association (AFA).

The Brazil Olympic football team represents Brazil in international football competitions in Olympic Games. The selection is limited to players under the age of 23, except three overage players. The team is controlled by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF). In 13 participations, Brazil won one gold medal (2016), three silver medals and two bronze medals.

Melissa Tancredi Association footballer

Melissa Palma Julie Tancredi is a Canadian retired soccer forward who played for the Canada women's national soccer team. She won an Olympic bronze medal as a participating member of Canada's national team at the 2012 Olympics when Canada defeated France 1–0 in the bronze medal match on August 9, 2012. Tancredi's nickname is "Tanc".

Kosovare Asllani Swedish footballer

Kosovare Asllani is a Swedish professional footballer who plays for Spanish Primera División club CD Tacón and the Sweden women's national team. Nicknamed "Kosse", Asllani is a proficient striker, possessing great speed and technique in her game. Her playing abilities and Balkan heritage have drawn comparisons with Zlatan Ibrahimović, who captained the Sweden men's national team.

Great Britain Olympic football team national association football team

The Great Britain Olympic football team is the men's football team that represents the United Kingdom at the Summer Olympic Games. The team is organised by the English Football Association (FA) as the footballing representative of the British Olympic Association. The team only competes in the Olympic Games. In other international football tournaments, the Home Nations of the United Kingdom are represented by their own national teams, a situation which pre-dated the establishment of a GB team.

France at the 2012 Summer Olympics

France competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, between 27 July and 12 August 2012. French athletes have competed in every Summer Olympic Games of the modern era. The French Olympic Committee sent a total of 330 athletes to the Games, 183 men and 147 women, to compete in 24 sports.

The Guatemala women's national football team is controlled by the Federación Nacional de Fútbol de Guatemala. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Central American region along with Costa Rica, having won the 1999 UNCAF championship.

Brazil at the 2012 Summer Olympics

Brazil competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, from 27 July to 12 August 2012. This was the nation's twenty-first appearance at the Summer Olympics, having missed the 1928 Summer Olympics in Amsterdam. The Brazilian Olympic Committee sent a total of 258 athletes to the Games, 136 men and 122 women, to compete in 24 sports. Brazil left London with a total of 17 Olympic medals, winning their second largest number of medals at a single games, a performance only surpassed 4 years later in Rio de Janeiro, when Brazil was the host country.

New Zealand at the 2012 Summer Olympics

New Zealand competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, from 27 July to 12 August 2012. This was the nation's twenty-fourth appearance at the Olympics. The New Zealand Olympic Committee sent 184 athletes, 97 men, and 87 women to the Games to compete in 16 sports, the nation's largest ever delegation.

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Womens tournament 2016 edition of the womens association football tournament during the Olympic Summer Games

The women's football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 19 August 2016. It was the 6th edition of the women's Olympic football tournament. Together with the men's competition, the 2016 Summer Olympics football tournament was held in six cities in Brazil, including Olympic host city Rio de Janeiro, which hosted the final at the Maracanã Stadium. There were no player age restrictions for teams participating in the women's competition.

References

  1. Goldblatt, David. The Ball Is Round : A Global History of Football. Penguin Books. p. 243. ISBN   978-0-14-101582-8.
  2. Mallon, Bill; Widlund, Ture (1998). The 1896 Olympic Games. Results for All Competitors in All Events, with Commentary . Jefferson: McFarland. p.  118. ISBN   0-7864-0379-9.
  3. Doyle, Paul (24 November 2011). "The forgotten story of ... football, farce and fascism at the 1936 Olympics". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 9 December 2014. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  4. "Controversia – Berlín 36. Un mito derrumbado (The Berlin '36 Controversy. A myth debunked.)" (in Spanish). Larepublica.com.pe. Archived from the original on 2009-03-22. Retrieved 2009-02-15.
  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2005-11-03. Retrieved 2006-11-03.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. "Women Sports Get a Boost". The New York Times . September 20, 1993. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  7. "Players". The Seattle Times . October 17, 1993. p. C2.
  8. Gildea, William (August 2, 1996). "U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins Gold". The Washington Post . p. A1. Archived from the original on August 25, 2014. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  9. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-08-09. Retrieved 2008-08-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. http://www.newsletter.co.uk/sport/YOUR-VIEWS-Olympic-football-threat.4327759%5B%5D
  11. "Brown pays tribute to GB success". BBC News. 24 August 2008. Retrieved 2 May 2010.
  12. "Nations pave way for 2012 GB team". BBC Sport . 2009-05-29. Archived from the original on 2009-05-31. Retrieved 2009-05-29.
  13. "London 2012 Olympics: Gareth Bale and non-English players have 'legal right' to play for Team GB". Daily Telegraph . 24 March 2011. Retrieved 28 April 2011.
  14. "Going for gold: Team GB Pearce reveals 18-man squad for London Olympics". Daily Mail. 2 July 2012. Archived from the original on 3 July 2012. Retrieved 2 July 2012.
  15. "So much for Team GB... Powell defends nearly all-English women's football squad". Daily Mail. 26 June 2012. Archived from the original on 23 August 2012. Retrieved 13 August 2012.
  16. Kelso, Paul (14 August 2012). "British Olympic Association chief executive Andy Hunt criticises Football Association for lack of support". London: Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 15 August 2012. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  17. "Organising Committee takes important decisions on FIFA Women's World Cup". FIFA.com. 1 October 2018. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  18. "Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Home nations agree to GB women's football team". BBC Sport. 1 October 2018. Archived from the original on 28 November 2018. Retrieved 20 December 2018.
  19. "Regulations for the Olympic Football Tournaments" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2016-08-20. Retrieved 2016-08-01.
  20. The 1900 and 1904 tournaments, they are not recognized by FIFA. The competition has been held regularly, except 1932. Since 1992 compete exclusively the U23 national teams.
  21. "REGULATIONS for the Olympic Football Tournaments" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-09-06.
  22. 1 2 The East German team represented the United Team of Germany in 1964, winning the bronze medal.
  23. The team represented the United Team of Germany in 1956, and the Federal Republic of Germany (i.e., West Germany) in 1972, 1984 and 1988, and winning the bronze medal in 1988.
  24. The United States had two teams at the 1904 Games, taking the silver and bronze medals.
  25. 1 2 The 1900 tournament was originally a pair of demonstration matches between the three teams, but has subsequently been upgraded to official status by the IOC with medals attributed to the teams based upon the match results.
  26. 1 2 The 1904 tournament was originally a set of demonstration matches between the three teams, but has subsequently been upgraded to official status by the IOC with medals attributed to the teams based upon the round-robin results.
  27. 1 2 In 1920, Czechoslovakia abandoned the final match against Belgium after 40 minutes with the latter up 2–0. They were disqualified, and a mini-tournament to figure out the other medalists was held, with Spain beating the Netherlands for second place 3–1.
  28. Ended 2–2 at the end of extra time. Both teams were awarded bronze medals.
  29. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-08-31. Retrieved 2016-08-19.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)