Snowboarding at the Winter Olympics

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Snowboarding at the Winter Olympics
Snowboarding pictogram.svg
IOC Discipline CodeSBD
Governing body FIS
Events10 (men: 5; women: 5)
Games
  • 1924
  • 1928
  • 1932
  • 1936
  • 1948
  • 1952
  • 1956
  • 1960
  • 1964
  • 1968
  • 1972
  • 1976
  • 1980
  • 1984
  • 1988
  • 1992
  • 1994
  • 1998

Snowboarding is a sport at the Winter Olympic Games. It was first included in the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan. [1] Snowboarding was one of five new sports or disciplines added to the Winter Olympic program between 1992 and 2002, and was the only one not to have been a previous medal or demonstration event. [2] In 1998, four events, two for men and two for women, were held in two specialities: the giant slalom, a downhill event similar to giant slalom skiing; and the half-pipe, in which competitors perform tricks while going from one side of a semi-circular ditch to the other. [2] Canadian Ross Rebagliati won the men's giant slalom and became the first athlete to win a gold medal in snowboarding. [3] Rebagliati was briefly stripped of his medal by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) after testing positive for marijuana. However, the IOC's decision was reverted following an appeal from the Canadian Olympic Association. [4] For the 2002 Winter Olympics, giant slalom was expanded to add head-to-head racing and was renamed parallel giant slalom. [5] In 2006, a third event, the snowboard cross, was held for the first time. In this event, competitors race against each other down a course with jumps, beams and other obstacles. [6] On July 11, 2011, the International Olympic Committee's Executive Board approved the addition of Ski and Snowboard Slopestyle to the Winter Olympics roster of events, effective in 2014. The decision was announced via press conference from the IOC's meeting in Durban, South Africa. A fifth event, parallel slalom, was added only for 2014. Big air was added for 2018.

Contents

Six athletes have won at least two medals. Shaun White of the United States is the only triple gold medalist. Philipp Schoch of Switzerland and Seth Wescott of the United States are the only double gold medalists. [7] [8] Karine Ruby of France and Americans Ross Powers and Danny Kass also won two medals. [9] [10] As of the 2014 Winter Olympics, 90 medals (30 of each color) have been awarded since 1998, and have been won by snowboarders from 21 National Olympic Committees.

Summary

GamesYearEventsBest Nation
18
19
20 1998 4Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
21 2002 4Flag of the United States.svg  United States
22 2006 6Flag of the United States.svg  United States
23 2010 6Flag of the United States.svg  United States
24 2014 10Flag of the United States.svg  United States
25 2018 10Flag of the United States.svg  United States
26 2022 11

Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Flag of the United States.svg  United States

Events

Men's

Event2428323648525660646872768084889294 98 02 06 10 14 18 22 Years
(parallel) giant slalom Note 1 7
half-pipe 7
snowboard cross 5
slopestyle 3
big air 2
parallel slalom 1
Total events2233555

Women's

Event2428323648525660646872768084889294 98 02 06 10 14 18 22 Years
(parallel) giant slalom Note 1 7
half-pipe 7
snowboard cross 5
slopestyle 3
big air 2
parallel slalom 1
Total events2233555

Mixed

Event2428323648525660646872768084889294 98 02 06 10 14 18 22 Years
snowboard cross, team 1
Total events1

^ Note 1. Giant slalom in 1998; parallel giant slalom since 2002.

Medal table

Sources (after the 2022 Winter Olympics): [11]
Accurate as of 2022 Winter Olympics.

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)1781035
2Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)82414
3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)55717
4Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)52411
5Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)45413
6Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic  (CZE)3014
7Flag of Russia.svg  Russia  (RUS)2215
8Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)1427
9Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)1337
10Flag of Australia.svg  Australia  (AUS)1326
11Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)1225
12Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)1203
13Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand  (NZL)1113
14Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands  (NED)1001
15Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)0415
16Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia  (SLO)0235
17Flag of Finland.svg  Finland  (FIN)0224
18Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)0112
19Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia  (SVK)0101
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea  (KOR)0101
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)0101
22Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)0022
23Russian Olympic Committee flag.svg  ROC 0011
Totals (23 nations)515151153

Number of athletes by nation

Nation2428323648525660646872768084889294 98 02 06 10 14 18 22 Years
Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra  (AND)                 1113
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina  (ARG)                 122
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia  (AUS)                 119811116
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria  (AUT)                 119121317146
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium  (BEL)                 132
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil  (BRA)                 11114
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria  (BUL)                 112235
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada  (CAN)                 129161824216
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China  (CHN)                 25694
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia  (CRO)                 11
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic  (CZE)                 35574
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark  (DEN)                 112
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland  (FIN)                 67551186
Flag of France.svg  France  (FRA)                 1312161713136
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany  (GER)                 8911810136
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain  (GBR)                 144755
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece  (GRE)                 31
Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland  (IRL)                 112
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy  (ITA)                 910161112126
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan  (JPN)                 7912118166
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan  (KAZ)                 11
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands  (NED)                 1122636
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand  (NZL)                 135545
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway  (NOR)                 7649956
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland  (POL)                 3264666
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia  (RUS)                 18615165
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia  (SRB)                 11
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia  (SVK)                 11114
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia  (SLO)                 12471076
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea  (KOR)                 14103
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain  (ESP)                 2154446
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden  (SWE)                 1011131226
Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland  (SUI)                 1212161624246
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine  (UKR)                 2213
Flag of the United States.svg  United States  (USA)                 1414161823256
Nations-----------------221924273130
Athletes-----------------125118187185243248
Year2428323648525660646872768084889294 98 02 06 10 14 18 22

See also

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References

  1. "Snowboarding". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  2. 1 2 "Snowboarding History". CBC Sports . Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  3. Berkow, Ira (1998-02-09). "Young, Hip Sport Zigzags Into the Olympic Mainstream". The New York Times . Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  4. Gross, George (2006-02-21). "Ross Rebagliati: 1998 – Nagano, Japan". Sun Media Corporation . Canadian Online Explorer. Archived from the original on 2012-05-23. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  5. Wong, Edward (2002-02-05). "Salt Lake City 2002: The 19th Olympic Winter Games; Snowboarding". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  6. Thompson, Anna (2006-02-17). "Snowboard cross 'here to stay'". BBC Sport . Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  7. Branch, John (2010-02-18). "White Cements His Status With 2nd Gold". New York Times . Retrieved 2010-02-18.
  8. "Swiss dominate PGS qualifying; American Jewell in final". ESPN. Associated Press. 2006-02-22. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  9. "Factsheet: Records and medals at the Olympic Winter Games" (PDF) (Press release). International Olympic Committee. February 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-03-20. Retrieved 2009-01-13.
  10. "Powers leads U.S. medals sweep in halfpipe". ESPN. 2002-02-11. Retrieved 2009-06-21.
  11. "Olympic Analytics - Medals by Countries". olympanalyt.com. Retrieved 2022-02-20.
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