England national football team

Last updated

England
England national football team crest.svg
Nickname(s) The Three Lions
Association The Football Association
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Gareth Southgate
Captain Harry Kane
Most caps Peter Shilton (125)
Top scorer Wayne Rooney (53)
Home stadium Wembley Stadium
FIFA code ENG
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Kit body eng18h.png
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Kit right arm eng18h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts eng18h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm eng18a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body eng18a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm eng18a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts usa18h.png
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Kit socks eng18a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 4 Increase2.svg 1 (4 April 2019) [1]
Highest3 (August 2012 [1] )
Lowest27 (February 1996 [1] )
Elo ranking
Current 5 Increase2.svg 2 (27 March 2019) [2]
Highest1 (1872–1876, 1892–1911,
1966–1970, 1987–1988)
Lowest17 (11 June 1995)
First international
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 0–0 England  Flag of England.svg
(Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872)
Biggest win
Flag of England.svg  England 13–0 Ireland  Saint Patrick's Saltire.svg
(Belfast, Ireland; 31 July 1882)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 7–1 England  Flag of England.svg
(Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954)
World Cup
Appearances15 (first in 1950 )
Best resultChampions (1966)
European Championship
Appearances9 (first in 1968 )
Best resultThird place (1968)
UEFA Nations League Finals
Appearances1 (first in 2019 )

The England men's national football team represents England in senior men's international football and is controlled by The Football Association, the governing body for football in England. [3] [4]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

The Football Association governing body of association football in England

The Football Association (FA) is the governing body of association football in England, the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey, and the Isle of Man. Formed in 1863, it is the oldest football association in the world and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the amateur and professional game in its territory.

Contents

England is one of the two oldest national teams in football, alongside Scotland, whom they played in the world's first international football match in 1872. England's home ground is Wembley Stadium, London, and their headquarters are at St George's Park, Burton upon Trent. The team's manager is Gareth Southgate. Although part of the United Kingdom, England's representative side plays in major professional tournaments, but not the Olympic Games.

Scotland national football team Mens association football team representing Scotland

The Scotland national football team represents Scotland in international football and is controlled by the Scottish Football Association. It competes in the three major professional tournaments, the FIFA World Cup, UEFA Nations League and the UEFA European Championship. Scotland, as a constituent country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete in the Olympic Games. The majority of Scotland's home matches are played at the national stadium, Hampden Park.

Wembley Stadium Football stadium in Wembley, London

Wembley Stadium is a football stadium in Wembley, London, which opened in 2007, on the site of the original Wembley Stadium, which was demolished from 2002–2003. The stadium hosts major football matches including home matches of the England national football team, and the FA Cup Final. The stadium was also the temporary home of Premier League football club Tottenham Hotspur between August 2017 and March 2019, while White Hart Lane was being demolished and their new stadium was constructed.

St Georges Park National Football Centre

St George's Park (SGP) is the English Football Association's national football centre (NFC) built on a 330-acre (130 ha) site at Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire. The centre was officially opened by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on 9 October 2012.

Since first entering the tournament in 1950, England has qualified for the FIFA World Cup 15 times. They won the 1966 World Cup, when they hosted the finals, and finished fourth in 1990 and 2018. Since first entering in 1964, England have never won the UEFA European Championship, with their best performances being a third-place finish in 1968 and 1996, the latter as hosts.

FIFA World Cup association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

1966 FIFA World Cup 1966 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1966 FIFA World Cup was the eighth FIFA World Cup and was held in England from 11 to 30 July 1966. England beat West Germany 4–2 in the final, winning the Jules Rimet Trophy. It is England's only FIFA World Cup title. They were the fifth nation to win and the third host nation to win after Uruguay in 1930 and Italy in 1934.

1966 FIFA World Cup Final association football match

The 1966 FIFA World Cup Final was a football match played at Wembley Stadium, London, on 30 July 1966 to determine the winner of the 1966 FIFA World Cup, the eighth FIFA World Cup. The match was contested by England and West Germany, with England winning 4–2 after extra time to claim the Jules Rimet Trophy. The match is remembered for England's – as of 2018 – only World Cup and major international title, Geoff Hurst's hat-trick – the first and as of 2018 only one ever scored in a FIFA World Cup Final – and the controversial third goal awarded to England by referee Gottfried Dienst and linesman Tofiq Bahramov. The England team became known as the "wingless wonders", on account of their then-unconventional narrow attacking formation, described at the time as a 4–4–2.

History

Early years

The England team before a match against Scotland at Richmond in 1893 England 1893.jpg
The England team before a match against Scotland at Richmond in 1893

The England national football team is the joint-oldest in the world; it was formed at the same time as Scotland. A representative match between England and Scotland was played on 5 March 1870, having been organised by the Football Association. A return fixture was organised by representatives of Scottish football teams on 30 November 1872. This match, played at Hamilton Crescent in Scotland, is viewed as the first official international football match, because the two teams were independently selected and operated, rather than being the work of a single football association. [5] Over the next 40 years, England played exclusively with the other three Home Nations—Scotland, Wales and Ireland—in the British Home Championship.

Hamilton Crescent cricket ground

Hamilton Crescent is a cricket ground located in the Partick area of Glasgow, Scotland. It is the home of the West of Scotland Cricket Club.

Home Nations The individual nations within the United Kingdom

The Home Nations, or Home Countries, refer collectively to England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, and in certain sports include the whole island of Ireland. The term "Home Nations" is used in this second sense partly because Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland have a unified association structure in certain sports, such as the Irish Rugby Football Union and Cricket Ireland. Formerly, the term was applied in general in this same wider sense, such as the period between 1801 and 1922, when the whole island of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom. The synonymous "Home Countries" is also sometimes used.

Wales national football team mens association football team representing Wales

The Wales national football team represents Wales in international football. It is controlled by the Football Association of Wales (FAW), the governing body for football in Wales and the third-oldest national football association in the world.

At first, England had no permanent home stadium. They joined FIFA in 1906 and played their first ever games against countries other than the Home Nations on a tour of Central Europe in 1908. Wembley Stadium was opened in 1923 and became their home ground. The relationship between England and FIFA became strained, and this resulted in their departure from FIFA in 1928, before they rejoined in 1946. As a result, they did not compete in a World Cup until 1950, in which they were beaten in a 1–0 defeat by the United States, failing to get past the first round in one of the most embarrassing defeats in the team's history. [6]

Wembley Stadium (1923) former stadium in London, England which opened in 1923

The original Wembley Stadium was a football stadium in Wembley Park, London, which stood on the same site now occupied by its successor, the new Wembley Stadium. The demolition in 2003 of its famous Twin Towers upset many people worldwide. Debris from the stadium was used to make the Northala Fields in Northolt, London.

1950 FIFA World Cup 1950 edition of the FIFA World Cup

The 1950 FIFA World Cup, held in Brazil from 24 June to 16 July 1950, was the fourth FIFA World Cup. It was the first World Cup since 1938, the planned 1942 and 1946 competitions having been cancelled due to World War II. It was won by Uruguay, who had won the inaugural competition in 1930. They clinched the cup by beating the hosts Brazil 2–1 in the deciding match of the four-team final group. This was the only tournament not decided by a one-match final. It was also the first tournament where the trophy was referred to as the Jules Rimet Cup, to mark the 25th anniversary of Jules Rimet's presidency of FIFA.

United States mens national soccer team Mens national association football team representing the USA

The United States Men's National Soccer Team (USMNT) is controlled by the United States Soccer Federation and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. The team has appeared in ten FIFA World Cups, including the first in 1930, where they reached the semi-finals. The U.S. participated in the 1934 and 1950 World Cups, winning 1–0 against England in the latter. After 1950, the U.S. did not qualify for the World Cup until 1990. The U.S. hosted the 1994 World Cup, where they lost to Brazil in the round of sixteen. They qualified for five more consecutive World Cups after 1994, becoming one of the tournament's regular competitors and often advancing to the knockout stage. The U.S. reached the quarter-finals of the 2002 World Cup, where they lost to Germany. In the 2009 Confederations Cup, they eliminated top-ranked Spain in the semi-finals before losing to Brazil in the final, their only appearance in the final of a major intercontinental tournament. The team failed to qualify for the 2018 World Cup, having been eliminated in continental qualifying, ending the streak of consecutive World Cups at seven. United States will co-host the 2026 FIFA World Cup along with Canada and Mexico, the automatic qualification of all three teams is likely as co-hosts.

Their first defeat on home soil to a foreign team was a 0–2 loss to the Republic of Ireland, on 21 September 1949 at Goodison Park. A 6–3 loss in 1953 to Hungary, was their second defeat by a foreign team at Wembley. In the return match in Budapest, Hungary won 7–1. This stands as England's largest ever defeat. After the game, a bewildered Syd Owen said, "it was like playing men from outer space". [7] In the 1954 FIFA World Cup, England reached the quarter-finals for the first time, and lost 4–2 to reigning champions Uruguay.

England v Ireland. On 21 September 1949 at Goodison Park, Liverpool, the home of Everton, England were defeated 2–0 by Ireland in a friendly international. As a result, Ireland became the first foreign team to beat England at home. In 1953 the Hungarian team known as the Mighty Magyars defeated England 6–3, to become the second team.

Republic of Ireland national football team Mens national association football team

The Republic of Ireland national football team represents Ireland in association football. It is governed by the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) and stages its home fixtures at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin.

Goodison Park football stadium

Goodison Park is a football stadium in Walton, Liverpool, England that has been home to Premier League club Everton since its completion in 1892. The stadium is in a residential area two miles (3 km) from Liverpool city centre. It has an all-seated capacity of 39,572.

Walter Winterbottom and Alf Ramsey

Elizabeth II presenting England captain Bobby Moore with the Jules Rimet trophy following England's 4-2 victory over West Germany in the 1966 World Cup final The Queen presents the 1966 World Cup to England Captain, Bobby Moore. (7936243534).jpg
Elizabeth II presenting England captain Bobby Moore with the Jules Rimet trophy following England's 4–2 victory over West Germany in the 1966 World Cup final

Although Walter Winterbottom was appointed as England's first ever full-time manager in 1946, the team was still picked by a committee until Alf Ramsey took over in 1963. The 1966 FIFA World Cup was hosted in England and Ramsey guided England to victory with a 4–2 win against West Germany after extra time in the final, during which Geoff Hurst famously scored a hat-trick. In UEFA Euro 1968, the team reached the semi-finals for the first time, being eliminated by Yugoslavia.

England qualified for the 1970 FIFA World Cup in Mexico as reigning champions, and reached the quarter-finals, where they were knocked out by West Germany. England had been 2–0 up, but were eventually beaten 3–2 after extra time. They failed in qualification for the 1974 FIFA World Cup, leading to Ramsey's dismissal.

Don Revie, Ron Greenwood and Bobby Robson

Ramsey was succeeded by Don Revie between 1974 and 1977, but the team failed to qualify for UEFA Euro 1976 and the 1978 FIFA World Cup. Under Ron Greenwood, they managed to qualify for the 1982 FIFA World Cup in Spain (the first time competitively since 1962); despite not losing a game, they were eliminated in the second group stage.

Bobby Robson managed England from 1982 to 1990. Although the team failed to qualify for UEFA Euro 1984, they reached the quarter-finals of the 1986 FIFA World Cup, losing 2–1 to Argentina in a game made famous by two goals by Maradona for very contrasting reasons. England striker Gary Lineker finished as the tournament's top scorer with six goals.

England went on to lose every match at UEFA Euro 1988. They next achieved their second best result in the 1990 FIFA World Cup by finishing fourth – losing again to West Germany in a semi-final finishing 1–1 after extra time, then 3–4 in England's first penalty shoot-out. Despite losing to Italy in the third place play-off, the members of the England team were given bronze medals identical to the Italians'. The England team of 1990 were welcomed home as heroes and thousands of people lined the streets for a spectacular open-top bus parade.

Graham Taylor, Terry Venables, Glenn Hoddle and Kevin Keegan

The 1990s saw four England managers follow Robson, each in the role for a relatively brief period. Graham Taylor was Robson's immediate successor. England failed to win any matches at UEFA Euro 1992, drawing with tournament winners Denmark and later with France, before being eliminated by host nation Sweden. The team then failed to qualify for the 1994 FIFA World Cup after losing a controversial game against the Netherlands in Rotterdam, which resulted in Taylor's resignation.

Between 1994 and 1996, Terry Venables managed the team. At UEFA Euro 1996, held in England, they equalled their best performance at a European Championship, reaching the semi-finals as they did in 1968, before exiting via a penalty shoot-out loss to Germany. [8] England striker Alan Shearer was the tournament's top scorer with five goals. Venables resigned following investigations into his financial activities. [9]

Venables' successor, Glenn Hoddle, similarly left the job for non-footballing reasons after just one international tournament – the 1998 FIFA World Cup  — in which England were eliminated in the second round again by Argentina and again on penalties (after a 2–2 draw). Following Hoddle's departure, Kevin Keegan took England to UEFA Euro 2000, but the team left in the group stage and he resigned shortly afterwards.

Sven-Göran Eriksson, Steve McClaren and Fabio Capello

The England team at the 2006 FIFA World Cup England team.jpg
The England team at the 2006 FIFA World Cup

Sven-Göran Eriksson took charge between 2001 and 2006, and was the team's first non-English manager. He guided England to the quarter-finals of the 2002 FIFA World Cup, UEFA Euro 2004 and the 2006 FIFA World Cup. England lost only five competitive matches during his tenure, and England rose to number four in the world ranking under his guidance. Eriksson's contract was extended by the FA by two years, to include UEFA Euro 2008, but was terminated by them after the 2006 World Cup.

Steve McClaren was then appointed as head coach, but after failing to qualify for Euro 2008 was sacked on 22 November 2007. The following month, he was replaced by a second foreign manager, Italian Fabio Capello, whose experience included spells at Juventus and Real Madrid. England won all but one of their qualifying games for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, but at the tournament itself, England drew their opening two games; this led to questions about the team's spirit, tactics and ability to handle pressure. [10] They progressed to the next round, however, where they were beaten 4–1 by Germany, their heaviest defeat in a World Cup finals tournament match. In February 2012, Capello resigned from his role as England manager, following a disagreement with the FA over their request to remove John Terry from team captaincy after accusations of racial abuse concerning the player. [11]

Roy Hodgson, Sam Allardyce and Gareth Southgate

In May 2012, Roy Hodgson was announced as the new manager, just six weeks before UEFA Euro 2012. [12] England managed to finish top of their group, but exited the Championships in the quarter-finals via a penalty shoot-out, against Italy. [13] In the 2014 FIFA World Cup, England were eliminated at the group stage for the first time since the 1958 World Cup, and the first time at a major tournament since Euro 2000. [14] England qualified unbeaten for UEFA Euro 2016, [15] but were ultimately eliminated in the Round of 16, losing 2–1 to Iceland. [16] Hodgson resigned as manager immediately, [17] and just under a month later was replaced by Sam Allardyce. [18] After only 67 days Allardyce resigned from his managerial post by mutual agreement, after alleged breach of rules of the FA, making him the shortest serving permanent England manager. [19]

The England line-up before the last match of group G against Belgium, 28 June 2018 England line-up before game v Belgium.jpg
The England line-up before the last match of group G against Belgium, 28 June 2018

Gareth Southgate, then the coach of the England under-21 team, was put in temporary charge of the national team until November of that year, [20] before being given the position on a permanent basis. [21] Under Southgate, England qualified for the 2018 FIFA World Cup [22] and came second in their group at the tournament. [23] [24] They defeated Colombia on penalties in the first knock-out round, [25] [26] and then beat Sweden 2–0 in the quarter-final to reach only their third World Cup semi-final. [27] [28] In the semi-final, they were beaten 2–1 in extra time by Croatia [29] [30] [31] and then were beaten by Belgium for a second time, 2–0, in the third place match. [32] England striker Harry Kane finished the tournament as top scorer with six goals.

Team image

Colours

England shirt for the 1966 World Cup final Eng1966 football shirt.jpeg
England shirt for the 1966 World Cup final

England's traditional home colours are white shirts, navy blue shorts and white or black socks. The team has periodically worn an all-white kit.

Although England's first away kits were blue, England's traditional away colours are red shirts, white shorts and red socks. In 1996, England's away kit was changed to grey shirts, shorts and socks. This kit was only worn three times, including against Germany in the semi-final of Euro 1996 but the deviation from the traditional red was unpopular with supporters and the England away kit remained red until 2011, when a navy blue away kit was introduced. The away kit is also sometimes worn during home matches, when a new edition has been released to promote it.

England have occasionally had a third kit. At the 1970 World Cup England wore a third kit with pale blue shirts, shorts and socks against Czechoslovakia. They had a kit similar to Brazil's, with yellow shirts, yellow socks and blue shorts which they wore in the summer of 1973. For the World Cup in 1986 England had a third kit of pale blue, imitating that worn in Mexico 16 years before and England retained pale blue third kits until 1992, but they were rarely used.

Umbro first agreed to manufacture the kit in 1954 and since then has supplied most of the kits, the exceptions being from 1959–1965 with Bukta and 1974–1984 with Admiral. Nike purchased Umbro in 2008 and took over as kit supplier in 2013 following their sale of the Umbro brand. [33]

The motif of the England national football team has three lions passant guardant, the emblem of King Richard I, who reigned from 1189 to 1199. [34] In 1872, English players wore white jerseys emblazoned with the three lions crest of the Football Association. [35] The lions, often blue, have had minor changes to colour and appearance. [36] Initially topped by a crown, this was removed in 1949 when the FA was given an official coat of arms by the College of Arms; this introduced ten Tudor roses, one for each of the regional branches of the FA. [35] [37] Since 2003, England top their logo with a star to recognise their World Cup win in 1966; this was first embroidered onto the left sleeve of the home kit, and a year later was moved to its current position, first on the away shirt. [38]

Kits