English football clubs in international competitions

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English football clubs have entered European association football competitions (UEFA Champions League/European Cup, UEFA Europa League/UEFA Cup and the now defunct UEFA Intertoto Cup, Inter-Cities Fairs Cup and UEFA Cup Winners' Cup) since 1955, when Birmingham City and a London XI took part in the inaugural Inter-Cities Fairs Cup. English clubs have also taken part in the FIFA Club World Cup on four occasions and the Intercontinental Cup on six occasions.

Contents

The European Cup began in 1955–56, but there was no English representative during that inaugural season as reigning champions Chelsea had been persuaded to withdraw by The Football League. The first English side to participate in the following edition was Manchester United, who were also the first English winners in 1968, ten years after their second entry into the cup had effectively ended when eight of their players died in the Munich air disaster when flying home from Belgrade after qualifying for the 1957–58 semi-final. Tottenham Hotspur won the Cup Winners' Cup in 1963.

Prior to that, England had been pioneers in establishing international competitions, with the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy, which was won by West Auckland when they defeated Italian side Juventus in 1909. English teams have participated in UEFA competitions every year save for the years between 1985–1990, when in the aftermath of the Heysel Stadium disaster, all English clubs were banned from Europe by UEFA; Liverpool, who had been playing at the Heysel Stadium against Juventus, were banned for six years, until 1991.

Between the 1992–93 and 2012–13 seasons, Premier League clubs won the UEFA Champions League four times (as well as supplying five of the runners-up), behind Spain's La Liga (six wins) and Italy's Serie A (five), and ahead of Germany's Bundesliga with three wins.

Several teams have managed to play in Europe while being outside the top flight, including more recently Birmingham City and Wigan Athletic. Liverpool are the most successful English team internationally with fourteen honours.

Who qualifies for UEFA competitions

From the 2015–16 season, the various permutations allow for a maximum of 5 English clubs to qualify for the UEFA Champions League and 3 for the UEFA Europa League. [1] From the 2018–19 season, the top four clubs in Europe's four highest ranked leagues qualify directly to the group stage. [2] These nations are currently England, Germany, Italy, and Spain. The minimum quota is for four English clubs to qualify for the UEFA Champions League and three for the UEFA Europa League.

CompetitionWho qualifiesNotes
UEFA Champions League group stagePremier League 1st
Premier League 2nd
Premier League 3rd
Premier League 4th
UEFA Champions League winnersSince the 2015–16 season, the UEFA Champions League winners gain entry to the UEFA Champions League in the group stages. [3]
UEFA Europa League winnersPrior to the 2015–16 season, there was a limit of four clubs from each association entering the Champions League. If a club outside of England's top four won the Champions League, the 4th placed club would be demoted to the Europa League in the following season. This occurred in the 2011–12 season when Chelsea won the Champions League but only finished sixth in the Premier League. They replaced the fourth-placed team Tottenham Hotspur in the Champions League, who were demoted to the Europa League.

From the 2018–19 season, the UEFA Europa League winners gain entry to the UEFA Champions League in the group stage. [4]

Also from that season, if English clubs win both the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League, and neither finish the Premier League in a position that qualifies them for the UEFA Champions League, the following will happen:

  • The club that won the UEFA Champions League will go straight into the group stage
  • The UEFA Europa League winners will go into the UEFA Champions League group stage
  • The club that finished fourth in the Premier League will transfer into the UEFA Europa League group stage

[5]

UEFA Europa League group stageFA Cup winners or Club finishing fifth in the Premier LeagueIf the FA Cup winners qualify for the UEFA Champions League or the UEFA Europa League via the domestic league or European performance, by Regulation 3.04, [6] the highest ranking non-qualified league club qualifies, taking the lowest Europa League spot (the League Cup spot – the League Cup inherits the League spot, and the League inherits the FA Cup spot).
UEFA Europa League second qualifying roundLeague Cup winnersIf the League Cup winners have already qualified for Europe through other means, then the next highest-finishing Premier League club gets this place
UEFA Europa League first qualifying roundPremier League club with the best UEFA Fair Play ranking that has not already qualified for Europe, but only if England has one of the top three positions and has a fair play score of above eight.As of 2015, Fair Play no longer earns this Europa League spot. Instead, such teams will be awarded in cash prizes, with the money to be spent on related initiatives. [7]

Wales-based clubs

Note that some Premier League clubs are not based in England. Because they are members of the Football Association of Wales (FAW), the question of which country clubs like Cardiff City and Swansea City should represent in European competitions has caused long-running discussions in UEFA. Despite being a member of the FAW, Swansea took up one of England's three available places in the UEFA Europa League in 2013–14, thanks to winning the League Cup in 2012–13. The right of Welsh clubs to take up such English places was in doubt until UEFA clarified the matter in March 2012. [8]

Multiple winners of European and worldwide competitions from England

ClubNumber of WinsYears
Liverpool 141973, 1976, 1977 (2), 1978, 1981, 1984, 2001 (2), 2005 (2), 2019 (3)
Manchester United 81968, 1991 (2), 1999 (2), 2008 (2), 2017
Chelsea 71971, 1998 (2), 2012, 2013, 2019, 2021
Tottenham Hotspur 31963, 1972, 1984
Nottingham Forest 31979 (2), 1980
Aston Villa 31982 (2), 2001
West Ham United 21965, 1999
Leeds United 21968, 1971
Newcastle United 21969, 2006
Arsenal 21970, 1994

European and World competition winners

European Cup/Champions LeagueUEFA Cup/Europa LeagueCup Winners' CupInter-Cities Fairs CupSuper CupFIFA Club World CupIntercontinental CupIntertoto Cup
2020–21Chelsea 2018–19Chelsea 1997–98Chelsea 1970–71Leeds United 2019Liverpool 2019Liverpool 1999Manchester United 2006Newcastle United
2018–19Liverpool 2016–17Manchester United 1993–94Arsenal 1969–70Arsenal 2005Liverpool 2008Manchester United 2002Fulham
2011–12Chelsea 2012–13Chelsea 1990–91Manchester United 1968–69Newcastle United 2001Liverpool 2001Aston Villa
2007–08Manchester United 2000–01Liverpool 1984–85Everton 1967–68Leeds United 1998Chelsea 1999West Ham United
2004–05Liverpool 1983–84Tottenham Hotspur 1970–71Chelsea 1991Manchester United
1998–99Manchester United 1980–81Ipswich Town 1969–70Manchester City 1982Aston Villa
1983–84Liverpool 1975–76Liverpool 1964–65West Ham United 1979Nottingham Forest
1981–82Aston Villa 1972–73Liverpool 1962–63Tottenham Hotspur 1977Liverpool
1980–81Liverpool 1971–72Tottenham Hotspur
1979–80Nottingham Forest
1978–79Nottingham Forest
1977–78Liverpool
1976–77Liverpool
1967–68Manchester United

Full European record for English league clubs

Note: Clubs in bold won the corresponding competition that season.

UEFA Champions League/European Cup

English clubs have won the competition thirteen times and been in the final on eight occasions as of 2020.

SeasonClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
1955–56 None entered
1956–57 Manchester United Semi-finals3–5 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Real Madrid 1–3 at Santiago Bernabéu
2–2 at Old Trafford
1957–58 2–5 Flag of Italy.svg Milan 2–1 at Old Trafford
0–4 at San Siro
1958–59 First round Flag of Switzerland.svg Young Boys Walkover – United withdrawn by the Football League
Wolverhampton Wanderers 3–4 Flag of Germany.svg Schalke 04 2–2 at Molineux
1–2 at Glückauf-Kampfbahn
1959–60 Quarter-finals2–9 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Barcelona 0–4 at Camp Nou
2–5 at Molineux
1960–61 Burnley 4–5 Flag of Germany.svg Hamburger SV 3–1 at Turf Moor
1–4 at Volksparkstadion
1961–62 Tottenham Hotspur Semi-finals3–4 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica 1–3 at Estádio da Luz
2–1 at White Hart Lane
1962–63 Ipswich Town First round2–4 Flag of Italy.svg Milan 0–3 at San Siro
2–1 at Portman Road
1963–64 Everton Preliminary round0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Inter Milan 0–0 at Goodison Park
0–1 at Stadio Giuseppe Meazza
1964–65 Liverpool Semi-finals3–43–1 at Anfield
0–3 at Stadio Giuseppe Meazza
1965–66 Manchester United 1–2 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Partizan 0–1 at Partizan
1–0 at Old Trafford
1966–67 Liverpool Second round3–7 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax 1–5 at De Meer
2–2 at Anfield
1967–68 Manchester United Winners 4–1 aet. Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica Wembley Stadium
1968–69 Manchester City First round1–2 Flag of Turkey.svg Fenerbahçe 0–0 at Maine Road
1–2 at Şükrü Saracoğlu Stadium
Manchester United Semi-finals Flag of Italy.svg Milan 0–2 at San Siro
1–0 at Old Trafford
1969–70 Leeds United 1–3 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 0–1 at Elland Road
1–2 at Hampden Park
1970–71 Everton Quarter-finals1–1 (a) Flag of Greece (1970-1975).svg Panathinaikos 1–1 at Goodison Park
0–0 at Apostolos Nikolaidis Stadium
1971–72 Arsenal 1–3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax 1–2 at De Meer Stadion
0–1 at Highbury Stadium
1972–73 Derby County Semi-finals1–3 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 1–3 at Stadio Comunale
0–0 at Baseball Ground
1973–74 Liverpool Second round2–4 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Red Star Belgrade 1–2 at Red Star Stadium
1–2 at Anfield
1974–75 Leeds United Final 0–2 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich Parc des Princes
1975–76 Derby County Second round5–6 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Real Madrid 4–1 at Baseball Ground
1–5 at Santiago Bernabéu
1976–77 Liverpool Winners 3–1 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach Stadio Olimpico
1977–78 Winners 1–0 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge Wembley Stadium
1978–79 Liverpool First round0–2 Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest 0–2 at City Ground
0–0 at Anfield
Nottingham Forest Winners 1–0 Flag of Sweden.svg Malmö FF Olympiastadion Munich
1979–80 Liverpool First round2–4 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Dinamo Tbilisi 2–1 at Anfield
0–3 at Boris Paichadze Stadium
Nottingham Forest Winners 1–0 Flag of Germany.svg Hamburger SV Santiago Bernabéu
1980–81 Nottingham Forest First round0–2 Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg CSKA Sofia 0–1 at Balgarska Armia Stadium
0–1 at City Ground
Liverpool Winners 1–0 Flag of Spain (1977-1981).svg Real Madrid Parc des Princes
1981–82 Liverpool Quarter-finals1–2 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Bulgaria (1971 - 1990).svg CSKA Sofia 0–1 at Anfield
2–0 at Balgarska Armia Stadium
Aston Villa Winners 1–0 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich De Kuip
1982–83 Liverpool Quarter-finals3–4 Flag of Poland.svg Widzew Łódź 0–2 at Stadion Widzewa
3–2 at Anfield
Aston Villa 2–5 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 1–2 at Villa Park
1–3 at Stadio Olimpico di Torino
1983–84 Liverpool Winners 1–1 aet. (4–2 p) Flag of Italy.svg Roma Stadio Olimpico
1984–85 Final 0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus Heysel Stadium
1985–86 Banned (Everton)
1986–87 Banned (Liverpool)
1987–88 Banned (Everton)
1988–89 Banned (Liverpool)
1989–90 Banned (Arsenal)
1990–91 [lower-alpha 1] Banned (Liverpool)
1991–92 Arsenal Second round2–4 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica 1–1 at Estádio da Luz
1–3 at Highbury
1992–93 Leeds United 2–4 Flag of Scotland.svg Rangers 1–2 at Elland Road
1–2 at Ibrox
1993–94 Manchester United 3–3 (a) Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray 3–3 at Old Trafford
0–0 at Ali Sami Yen Stadium
1994–95 Manchester United 3rd in group stageN/A Flag of Sweden.svg IFK Göteborg, Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona, Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray
1995–96 Blackburn Rovers 4th in group stageN/A Flag of Russia.svg Spartak Moscow, Flag of Poland.svg Legia Warsaw, Flag of Norway.svg Rosenborg
1996–97 Manchester United Semi-finals0–2 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund 0–1 at Signal Iduna Park
0–1 at Old Trafford
1997–98 Newcastle United 3rd in group stageN/A Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv, Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven, Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona
Manchester United Quarter-finals1–1 (a) Flag of France.svg Monaco 0–0 at Stade Louis II
1–1 at Old Trafford
1998–99 Arsenal 3rd in group stageN/A Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv, Flag of France.svg Lens, Flag of Greece.svg Panathinaikos
Manchester United Winners 2–1 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich Camp Nou
1999–2000 Arsenal 3rd in first group stage UEFA Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona, Flag of Italy.svg Fiorentina, Flag of Sweden.svg AIK
Chelsea Quarter-finals4–6 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 3–1 at Stamford Bridge
1–5 at Camp Nou
Manchester United 2–3 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 0–0 at Santiago Bernabéu
2–3 at Old Trafford
2000–01 Arsenal Quarter-finals2–2 (a) Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 2–1 at Highbury
0–1 at Mestalla
Manchester United 1–3 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 0–1 at Old Trafford
1–2 at Olympiastadion
Leeds United Semi-finals0–3 Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 0–0 at Elland Road
0–3 at Mestalla
2001–02 Arsenal 3rd in second group stageN/A Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen, Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña, Flag of Italy.svg Juventus
Liverpool Quarter-finals3–4 Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen 1–0 at Anfield
2–4 at BayArena
Manchester United Semi-finals3–3 (a)2–2 at Old Trafford
1–1 at BayArena
2002–03 Liverpool 3rd in first group stage UEFA Flag of Spain.svg Valencia, Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel, Flag of Russia.svg Spartak Moscow
Newcastle United 3rd in second group stageN/A Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona, Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Inter Milan, Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen
Arsenal Flag of Spain.svg Valencia, Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax, Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Roma
Manchester United Quarter-finals5–6 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 1–3 at Santiago Bernabéu
4–3 at Old Trafford
2003–04 Newcastle United Third qualifying round1–1 (4–3 p)
(UEFA)
Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg Partizan 1–0 at Partizan Stadium
0–1 at St James' Park
Manchester United Quarter-finals2–3 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 1–2 at Estádio do Dragão
1–1 at Old Trafford
Arsenal Flag of England.svg Chelsea 1–1 at Stamford Bridge
1–2 at Highbury
Chelsea Semi-finals3-5 Flag of France.svg Monaco 1–3 at Stade Louis II
2–2 at Stamford Bridge
2004–05 Manchester United Round of 160–2 Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan 0–1 at Old Trafford
0–1 at San Siro
Arsenal 2–3 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–3 at Allianz Arena
1–0 at Highbury
Chelsea Semi-finals0–1 Flag of England.svg Liverpool 0–0 at Stamford Bridge
0–1 at Anfield
Liverpool Winners 3–3 aet. (3–2 p) Flag of Italy (2003-2006).svg Milan Atatürk Olympic Stadium
2005–06 Everton Third qualifying round2–4
UEFA
Flag of Spain.svg Villarreal 1–2 at Goodison Park
1–2 at Estadio El Madrigal
Manchester United 4th in group stageN/A

Flag of Spain.svg Villarreal, Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica, Flag of France.svg Lille

Chelsea Round of 162–3 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 1–2 at Stamford Bridge
0–1 at Camp Nou
Liverpool 0–3 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica 0–1 at Estádio da Luz
0–2 at Anfield
Arsenal Final 1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona Stade de France
2006–07 Arsenal Round of 161–2 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven 0–1 at Philips Stadion
1–1 at Emirates Stadium
Chelsea Semi-finals1–1 (1–4 p) Flag of England.svg Liverpool 1–0 at Stamford Bridge
0–1 at Anfield
Manchester United Semi-finals3–5 Flag of Italy.svg Milan 3–2 at Old Trafford
0–3 at San Siro
Liverpool Final 1–2 Olympic Stadium
2007–08 Arsenal Quarter-finals3–5 Flag of England.svg Liverpool 1–1 at Emirates Stadium
2–4 at Anfield
Liverpool Semi-finals3–4 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of England.svg Chelsea 1–1 at Anfield
2–3 at Stamford Bridge
Chelsea Final 1–1 (5–6 p) Flag of England.svg Manchester United Luzhniki Stadium
Manchester United Winners 1–1 (6–5 p) Flag of England.svg Chelsea Luzhniki Stadium
2008–09 Liverpool Quarter-finals5–7 Flag of England.svg Chelsea 1–3 at Anfield
4–4 at Stamford Bridge
Chelsea Semi-finals1–1 (a) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 0–0 at Camp Nou
1–1 at Stamford Bridge
Arsenal 1–4 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 0–1 at Old Trafford
1–3 at Emirates Stadium
Manchester United Final 0–2 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona Stadio Olimpico
2009–10 Liverpool 3rd in group stage UEFA

Flag of Italy.svg Fiorentina, Flag of France.svg Lyon, Flag of Hungary.svg Debrecen

Chelsea Round of 161–3 Flag of Italy.svg Inter Milan 1–2 at San Siro
0–1 at Stamford Bridge
Arsenal Quarter-finals3–6 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 2–2 at Emirates Stadium
1–4 at Camp Nou
Manchester United 4–4 (a) Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–2 at Allianz Arena
3–2 at Old Trafford
2010–11 Arsenal Round of 163–4 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 2–1 at Emirates Stadium
1–3 at Camp Nou
Chelsea Quarter-finals1–3 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 0–1 at Stamford Bridge
1–2 at Old Trafford
Tottenham Hotspur 0–5 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 0–4 at Santiago Bernabéu
0–1 at White Hart Lane
Manchester United Final 1–3 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona Wembley Stadium
2011–12 Manchester City 3rd in group stage UEFA Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich, Flag of Italy.svg Napoli, Flag of Spain.svg Villarreal
Manchester United Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica, Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel, Flag of Romania.svg Oțelul Galați
Arsenal Round of 163–4 Flag of Italy.svg Milan 0–4 at San Siro
3–0 at Emirates Stadium
Chelsea Winners 1–1 aet. (4–3 p) Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich Allianz Arena
2012–13 Manchester City 4th in group stageN/A Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund, Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid, Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax
Chelsea 3rd in group stage UEFA Flag of Italy.svg Juventus, Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk, Flag of Denmark.svg Nordsjælland
Manchester United Round of 162–3 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 1–1 at Santiago Bernabéu
1–2 at Old Trafford
Arsenal 3–3 (a) Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–3 at Emirates Stadium
0–2 at Allianz Arena
2013–14 Arsenal Round of 161–3 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 0–2 at Emirates Stadium
1–1 at Allianz Arena
Manchester City 1–4 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 0–2 at Etihad Stadium
1–2 at Camp Nou
Manchester United Quarter-finals2–4 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–1 at Old Trafford
1–3 at Allianz Arena
Chelsea Semi-finals1–3 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 0–0 at Vicente Calderón
1–3 at Stamford Bridge
2014–15 Liverpool 3rd in group stage UEFA Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid, Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel, Flag of Bulgaria.svg Ludogorets Razgrad
Manchester City Round of 161–3 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 1–2 at Etihad Stadium
0–1 at Camp Nou
Arsenal 3–3 (a) Flag of France.svg Monaco 1–3 at Emirates Stadium
2–0 at Stade Louis II
Chelsea 3–3 (a
( a.e.t. )
Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain 1–1 at Parc des Princes
2–2 at Stamford Bridge
2015–16 Manchester United 3rd in group stage UEFA Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg, Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven, Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow
Arsenal Round of 161–5 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 0–2 at Emirates Stadium
1–3 at Camp Nou
Chelsea 2–4 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain 1–2 at Parc des Princes
1–2 at Stamford Bridge
Manchester City Semi-finals0–1 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 0–0 at Etihad Stadium
0–1 at Santiago Bernabéu
2016–17 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd in group stage UEFA Flag of France.svg Monaco, Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen, Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow
Arsenal Round of 162–10 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–5 at Allianz Arena
1–5 at Emirates Stadium
Manchester City 6–6 (a) Flag of France.svg Monaco 5–3 at Etihad Stadium
1–3 at Stade Louis II
Leicester City Quarter-finals1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 0–1 at Vicente Calderón
1–1 at King Power Stadium
2017–18 Chelsea Round of 161–4 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 1–1 at Stamford Bridge
0–3 at Camp Nou
Manchester United 1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Sevilla 0–0 at Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán
1–2 at Old Trafford
Tottenham Hotspur 3–4 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 2–2 at Juventus Stadium
1–2 at Wembley Stadium
Manchester City Quarter-finals1–5 Flag of England.svg Liverpool 0–3 at Anfield
1–2 at Etihad Stadium
Liverpool Final 1–3 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid NSC Olimpiyskiy Stadium
2018–19 Manchester United Quarter-finals0–4 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 0–1 at Old Trafford
0–3 at Camp Nou
Manchester City 4–4 (a) Flag of England.svg Tottenham Hotspur 0–1 at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium
4–3 at Etihad Stadium
Tottenham Hotspur Final 0–2 Flag of England.svg Liverpool Wanda Metropolitano
Liverpool Winners 2–0 Flag of England.svg Tottenham Hotspur
2019–20 Chelsea Round of 161–7 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 0–3 at Stamford Bridge
1–4 at Allianz Arena
Tottenham Hotspur 0–4 Flag of Germany.svg RB Leipzig 0–1 at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium
0–3 at Red Bull Arena
Liverpool 2–4 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 0–1 at Wanda Metropolitano
2–3 at Anfield
Manchester City Quarter-finals1–3 Flag of France.svg Lyon Estádio José Alvalade
2020–21 Manchester United 3rd in group stage UEFA Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain, Flag of Germany.svg RB Leipzig, Flag of Turkey.svg İstanbul Başakşehir
Liverpool Quarter-finals1–3 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 1–3 at Alfredo Di Stéfano
0–0 at Anfield
Manchester City Final 0–1 Flag of England.svg Chelsea Estádio do Dragão
Chelsea Winners 1–0 Flag of England.svg Manchester City

Note: UEFA denotes qualified for the UEFA Cup/Europa League.

  1. The Heysel ban for English clubs was lifted for 1990–91, apart from for Liverpool who served an additional year.

UEFA Cup/UEFA Europa League

English clubs have won the competition nine times and reached the final on seven other occasions (including 1972 and 2019 when both finalists were from England).

SeasonClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
1971–72 Southampton First round2–3 Flag of Spain.svg Athletic Bilbao 2–1 at The Dell
0–2 at San Mamés
Leeds United 2–4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Lierse 2–0 at Lierse
0–4 at Elland Road
Wolverhampton Wanderers Final 2–3 Flag of England.svg Tottenham Hotspur 1–2 at Molineux
1–1 at White Hart Lane
Tottenham Hotspur Winners 3–2 Flag of England.svg Wolverhampton Wanderers 2–1 at Molineux
1–1 at White Hart Lane
1972–73 Manchester City First round3–4 Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 2–2 at Maine Road
1–2 at Mestalla
Stoke City 3–5 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Kaiserslautern 3–1 at Victoria Ground
0–4 at Fritz-Walter-Stadion
Tottenham Hotspur Semi-finals2–2 (a) Flag of England.svg Liverpool 0–1 at Anfield
2–1 at White Hart Lane
Liverpool Winners 3–2 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach 3–0 at Anfield
0–2 at Bökelbergstadion
1973–74 Wolverhampton Wanderers Second round4–4 (a) Flag of East Germany.svg Lokomotive Leipzig 0–3 at Bruno-Plache-Stadion
4–1 at Molineux
Leeds United Third round2–3 Flag of Portugal.svg Vitória de Setúbal 1–0 at Elland Road
1–3 at Estádio do Bonfim
Ipswich Town Quarter-finals1–1 (3–4 p) Flag of East Germany.svg Lokomotive Leipzig 1–0 at Portman Road
0–1 at Bruno-Plache-Stadion
Tottenham Hotspur Final 2–4 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Feyenoord 2–2 at White Hart Lane
0–2 at De Kuip
1974–75 Ipswich Town First round3–3 (a) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Twente 2–2 at Portman Road
1–1 at Diekman Stadion
Stoke City 1–1 (a) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax 1–1 at Victoria Ground
0–0 at De Meer Stadion
Wolverhampton Wanderers 4–5 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 1–4 at Estádio das Antas
3–1 at Molineux
Derby County Third round4–5 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Velež Mostar 3–1 at Baseball Ground
1–4 at Bijeli Brijeg Stadium
1975–76 Aston Villa First round1–5 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Royal Antwerp 1–4 at Bosuilstadion
0–1 at Villa Park
Everton 0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Milan 0–0 at Goodison Park
0–1 at San Siro
Ipswich Town 3–4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge 3–0 at Portman Road
0–4 at Olympiastadion
Liverpool Winners 4–33–2 at Anfield
1–1 at Olympiastadion
1976–77 Manchester City First round1–2 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 1–0 at City Ground
0–2 at Stadio Comunale di Torino
Derby County Second round2–5 Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens 0–2 at Nikos Goumas Stadium
2–3 at Baseball Ground
Manchester United 1–3 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 1–0 at Old Trafford
0–3 at Stadio Comunale di Torino
Queen's Park Rangers Quarter-finals3–3 (6–7 p) Flag of Greece.svg AEK Athens 3–0 at Loftus Road
0–3 at Nikos Goumas Stadium
1977–78 Manchester City First round2–2 (a) Flag of Poland.svg Widzew Łódź 2–2 at Maine Road
0–0 at Stadion Widzewa
Newcastle United Second round2–5 (a) Flag of France.svg Bastia 1–2 at Stade Armand Cesari
1–3 at St James' Park
Ipswich Town Third round3–3 (1–3 p) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 3–0 at Portman Road
0–3 at Camp Nou
Aston Villa Quarter-finals3–42–2 at Villa Park
1–2 at Camp Nou
1978–79 Everton Second round2–2 (a) Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Dukla Prague 2–1 at Goodison Park
0–1 at Stadion Juliska
Arsenal Third round1–2 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Red Star Belgrade 0–1 at Red Star Stadium
1–1 at Highbury
West Bromwich Albion Quarter-finals1–20–1 at Red Star Stadium
1–1 at The Hawthorns
Manchester City 2–4 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach 1–1 at Maine Road
1–3 at Bökelbergstadion
1979–80 West Bromwich Albion First round1–4 Flag of East Germany.svg Carl Zeiss Jena 0–2 at Ernst-Abbe-Sportfeld
1–2 at The Hawthorns
Everton 0–2 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Feyenoord 0–1 at Feyenoord Stadion
0–1 at Goodison Park
Leeds United Second round0–4 Flag of Romania.svg Universitatea Craiova 0–2 at Stadionul Central
0–2 at Elland Road
Ipswich Town 1–1 (a) Flag of Switzerland.svg Grasshopper 0–0 at Hardturm
1–1 at Portman Road
1980–81 Wolverhampton Wanderers First round2–3 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven 1–3 at Philips Stadion
1–0 at Molineux
Manchester United 1–1 (a) Flag of Poland.svg Widzew Łódź 1–1 at Old Trafford
0–0 at Stadion Widzewa
Ipswich Town Winners 5–4 Flag of the Netherlands.svg AZ 3–0 at Portman Road
2–4 at Olympic Stadium
1981–82 West Bromwich Albion First round1–4 Flag of Switzerland.svg Grasshopper 0–1 at Hardturm
1–3 at The Hawthorns
Ipswich Town 2–4 Flag of Scotland.svg Aberdeen 1–1 at Portman Road
1–3 at Pittodrie Stadium
Southampton Second round2–4 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 2–4 at The Dell
0–0 at Estádio José Alvalade
Arsenal 2–2 (a) Flag of Belgium (civil).svg SV Winterslag 0–1 at Genk
2–1 at Highbury
1982–83 Arsenal First round4–8 Flag of Russia.svg Spartak Moscow 2–3 at Luzhniki Stadium
2–5 at Highbury
Manchester United 1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 0–0 at Old Trafford
1–2 at Mestalla
Ipswich Town 3–4 Flag of Italy.svg Roma 0–3 at Stadio Olimpico
3–1 at Portman Road
Southampton 2–2 (a) Flag of Sweden.svg IFK Norrköping 2–2 at The Dell
0–0 at Idrottsparken
1983–84 Aston Villa Second round3–4 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Spartak Moscow 2–2 at Luzhniki Stadium
1–2 at Villa Park
Watford Third round2–7 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 2–3 at Vicarage Road
0–4 at Letná Stadium
Nottingham Forest Semi-finals2–3 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 2–0 at City Ground
0–3 at Constant Vanden Stock Stadium
Tottenham Hotspur Winners 2–2 (4–3 p)1–1 at Constant Vanden Stock Stadium
1–1 at White Hart Lane
1984–85 Nottingham Forest First round0–1 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge 0–0 at City Ground
0–1 at Olympiastadion
Southampton 0–2 Flag of Germany.svg Hamburger SV 0–0 at The Dell
0–1 at Volksparkstadion
Queen's Park Rangers Second round6–6 (a) Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Partizan 6–2 at Loftus Road
0–4 at Partizan Stadium
Tottenham Hotspur Quarter-finals0–1 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid 0–1 at White Hart Lane
0–0 at Santiago Bernabéu
Manchester United 1–1 (4–5 p) Flag of Hungary.svg Videoton 1–0 at Old Trafford
0–1 at Stadion Sostoi
1985–86 Banned (Liverpool, Tottenham Hotspur, Southampton, Norwich City)
1986–87 Banned (West Ham United, Manchester United, Sheffield Wednesday, Oxford United)
1987–88 Banned (Liverpool, Tottenham Hotspur, Arsenal, Norwich City)
1988–89 Banned (Manchester United, Nottingham Forest, Everton, Luton Town)
1989–90 Banned (Nottingham Forest, Norwich City, Derby County
Tottenham Hotspur)
1990–91 [lower-alpha 1] Aston Villa Second round2–3 Flag of Italy.svg Inter Milan 2–0 at Villa Park
0–3 at San Siro
1991–92 [lower-alpha 2] Liverpool Quarter-finals1–4 Flag of Italy.svg Genoa 0–2 at Stadio Luigi Ferraris
1–2 at Anfield
1992–93 [lower-alpha 3] Manchester United First round0–0 (3–4 p) Flag of Russia.svg Torpedo Moscow 0–0 at Old Trafford
0–0 at Luzhniki Stadium
Sheffield Wednesday Second round3–5 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Kaiserslautern 1–3 at Fritz Walter Stadion
2–2 at Hillsborough Stadium
1993–94 [lower-alpha 4] Aston Villa 1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 1–1 at Estadio Riazor
0–1 at Villa Park
Norwich City Third round0–2 Flag of Italy.svg Inter Milan 0–1 at Carrow Road
0–1 at San Siro
1994–95 [lower-alpha 5] Blackburn Rovers First round2–3 Flag of Sweden.svg Trelleborgs FF 0–1 at Ewood Park
2–2 at Vångavallen
Newcastle United Second round3–3 (a) Flag of Spain.svg Athletic Bilbao 3-2 at St James' Park
0-1 at San Mamés
Aston Villa 2–2 (a) Flag of Turkey.svg Trabzonspor 0–1 at Hüseyin Avni Aker Stadium
2–1 at Villa Park
1995–96 [lower-alpha 6] Manchester United First round2–2 (a) Flag of Russia.svg Rotor Volgograd 0–0 at Rotor Stadium
2–2 at Old Trafford
Liverpool Second round0–1 Flag of Denmark.svg Brøndby 0–0 at Brøndby Stadium
0–1 at Anfield
Leeds United 3–8 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven 3–5 at Elland Road
0–3 at Philips Stadion
Nottingham Forest Quarter-finals2–7 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–2 at Olympic Stadium
1–5 at City Ground
1996–97 [lower-alpha 7] Arsenal First round4–6 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Mönchengladbach 2–3 at Highbury
2–3 at Müngersdorfer Stadion
Aston Villa 1–1 (a) Flag of Sweden.svg Helsingborgs IF 1–1 at Villa Park
0–0 at Olympia
Newcastle United Quarter-finals0–4 Flag of France.svg Monaco 0–1 at St James' Park
0–3 at Stade Louis II
1997–98 Arsenal First round1–2 Flag of Greece.svg PAOK 0–1 at Toumba Stadium
1–1 at Highbury
Leicester City 1–4 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 1–2 at Vicente Calderón Stadium
0–2 at Old Trafford
Liverpool Second round2–3 Flag of France.svg Strasbourg 0–3 at Stade de la Meinau
2–0 at Anfield
Aston Villa Quarter finals2–2 (a) Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 0–1 at Vicente Calderón Stadium
2–1 at Villa Park
1998–99 Blackburn Rovers First round2–3 Flag of France.svg Lyon 0–1 at Ewood Park
2–2 at Stade de Gerland
Leeds United Second round0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Roma 0–1 at Stadio Olimpico
0–0 at Elland Road
Aston Villa 2–3 Flag of Spain.svg Celta Vigo 1–0 at Villa Park
1–3 at Balaídos
Liverpool Third round2–31–3 at Balaídos
1–0 at Anfield
1999–2000 West Ham United Second round0–2 Flag of Romania.svg Steaua București 0–2 at Stadionul Steaua
0–0 at Boleyn Ground
Tottenham Hotspur 1–2 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Kaiserslautern 1–0 at White Hart Lane
0–2 at Fritz Walter Stadion
Newcastle United Third round0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Roma 0–1 at Stadio Olimpico
0–0 at St James' Park
Leeds United Semi-finals2–4 Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray 0–2 at Ali Sami Yen Stadium
2–2 at Elland Road
Arsenal Final 0–0 (1–4 p) Parken Stadium
2000–01 Leicester City First round2–4 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Red Star Belgrade 1–1 at Filbert Street
1–3 at Wien
Chelsea First round1–2 Flag of Switzerland.svg St. Gallen 1–0 at Stamford Bridge
0–2 at Espenmoos
Liverpool Winners 5–4 (a.s.d.e.t.) Flag of Spain.svg Alavés Westfalenstadion
2001–02 Aston Villa First round3–3 (a) Flag of Croatia.svg Varteks 2–3 at Villa Park
1–0 at Stadion Varteks
Chelsea Second round1–3 Flag of Israel.svg Hapoel Tel Aviv 0–2 at Bloomfield Stadium
1–1 at Stamford Bridge
Ipswich Town Third round2–4 Flag of Italy.svg Inter Milan 1–0 at Portman Road
1–4 at San Siro
Leeds United Fourth round0–1 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven 0–0 at Philips Stadion
0–1 at Elland Road
2002–03 Chelsea First round4–5 Flag of Norway.svg Viking 2–1 at Stamford Bridge
2–4 at Stavanger Stadion
Ipswich Town Second round1–1 (2–4 p) Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Liberec 1–0 at Portman Road
0–1 at U Nisy Stadium
Blackburn Rovers 0–3 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 0–1 at Celtic Park
0–2 at Ewood Park
Leeds United Third round1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Málaga 0–0 at La Rosaleda Stadium
1–2 at Elland Road
Fulham 1–2 Flag of Germany.svg Hertha BSC 1–2 at Olympic Stadium
0–0 at Craven Cottage
Liverpool Quarter-finals1–3 Flag of Scotland.svg Celtic 1–1 at Celtic Park
0–2 at Anfield
2003–04 Blackburn Rovers First round2–4 Flag of Turkey.svg Gençlerbirliği 1–3 at Ankara 19 Mayıs Stadium
1–1 at Ewood Park
Southampton 1–2 Flag of Romania.svg Steaua București 1–1 at St Mary's Stadium
0–1 at Stadionul Steaua
Manchester City Second round1–1 (a) Flag of Poland.svg Dyskobolia Grodzisk Wielkopolski 1–1 at City of Manchester Stadium
0–0 at Stadion Dyskobolia
Liverpool Fourth round2–3 Flag of France.svg Marseille 1–1 at Anfield
1–2 at Stade Vélodrome
Newcastle United Semi-finals0–20–0 at St James' Park
0–2 at Stade Vélodrome
2004–05 Millwall First round2–4 Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros 1–1 at The Old Den
1–3 at Stadion Albert Flórián
Middlesbrough Round of 162–4 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 2–3 at Riverside Stadium
0–1 at Estádio José Alvalade
Newcastle United Quarter-finals2–41–0 at St James' Park
1–4 at Estádio José Alvalade
2005–06 Everton First round2–5 Flag of Romania.svg Dinamo București 1–5 at Stadionul Dinamo
1–0 at Goodison Park
Bolton Wanderers Intermediate round1–2 Flag of France.svg Marseille 0–0 at Reebok Stadium
1–2 at Stade Vélodrome
Middlesbrough Final 0–4 Flag of Spain.svg Sevilla Philips Stadion
2006–07 West Ham United First round0–4 Flag of Italy.svg Palermo 0–1 at Boleyn Ground
0–3 at Stadio Renzo Barbera
Blackburn Rovers Intermediate round2–3 Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen 2–3 at BayArena
0–0 at Ewood Park
Newcastle United Round of 164–4 (a) Flag of the Netherlands.svg AZ 4–2 at St James' Park
0–2 at DSB Stadion
Tottenham Hotspur Quarter-finals3–4 Flag of Spain.svg Sevilla 1–2 at Ramón Sánchez Pizjuán Stadium
2–2 at White Hart Lane
2007–08 Blackburn Rovers First round2–3 Flag of Greece.svg AEL Larissa 0–2 at Alcazar Stadium
2–1 at Ewood Park
Everton Round of 162–2 (2–4 p) Flag of Italy.svg Fiorentina 0–2 at Stadio Artemio Franchi
2–0 at Goodison Park
Bolton Wanderers 1–2 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 1–1 at Reebok Stadium
0–1 at Estádio José Alvalade
Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 (5–6 p) Flag of the Netherlands.svg PSV Eindhoven 0–1 at White Hart Lane
1–0 at Philips Stadion
2008–09 Everton First round3–4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Standard Liège 2–2 at Goodison Park
1–2 at Stade Maurice Dufrasne
Portsmouth 4thin group stageN/A Flag of Germany.svg VfL Wolfsburg, Flag of Italy.svg Milan, Flag of Portugal.svg Braga, Flag of the Netherlands.svg Heerenveen
Aston Villa Intermediate round1–3 Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow 1–1 at Villa Park
0–2 at Luzhniki Stadium
Tottenham Hotspur Flag of Ukraine.svg Shakhtar Donetsk 0–2 at Donbass Arena
1–1 at White Hart Lane
Manchester City Quarter-finals3–4 Flag of Germany.svg Hamburger SV 1–3 at HSH Nordbank Arena
2–1 at City of Manchester Stadium
2009–10 Aston Villa Play-off round2–2 (a) Flag of Austria.svg Rapid Wien 0–1 at Gerhard Hanappi Stadium
2–1 at Villa Park
Everton Round of 322–4 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 2–1 at Goodison Park
0–3 at Estádio José Alvalade
Liverpool Semi-finals2–2 (a
a.e.t.)
Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 0–1 at Vicente Calderón Stadium
2–1 at Anfield
Fulham Final 2–1 (a.e.t.) HSH Nordbank Arena
2010–11 Aston Villa Play-off round3–4 Flag of Austria.svg Rapid Wien 1–1 at Gerhard Hanappi Stadium
2–3 at Villa Park
Liverpool Round of 160–1 Flag of Portugal.svg Braga 0–1 at Estádio Municipal de Braga
0–0 at Anfield
Manchester City 1–2 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv 0–2 at Valeriy Lobanovskyi Dynamo Stadium
1–0 at City of Manchester Stadium
2011–12 Tottenham Hotspur 3rd in group stageN/A Flag of Greece.svg PAOK, Flag of Russia.svg Rubin Kazan, Flag of Ireland.svg Shamrock Rovers
Birmingham City Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge, Flag of Portugal.svg Braga, Flag of Slovenia.svg Maribor
Fulham Flag of the Netherlands.svg Twente, Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Kraków, Flag of Denmark.svg Odense
Stoke City Round of 320–2 Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 0–1 at Britannia Stadium
0–1 at Mestalla
Manchester United Round of 163–5 Flag of Spain.svg Athletic Bilbao 2–3 at Old Trafford
1–2 at San Mamés
Manchester City 3–3 (a) Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 0–1 at Estádio José Alvalade
3–2 at City of Manchester Stadium
2012–13 Liverpool Round of 323–3 (a) Flag of Russia.svg Zenit Saint Petersburg 0–2 at Petrovsky Stadium
3–1 at Anfield
Newcastle United Quarter-finals2–4 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica 1–3 at Estádio da Luz
1–1 at St James' Park
Tottenham Hotspur 4–4 (1–4 p) Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel 2–2 at White Hart Lane
2–2 at St. Jakob-Park
Chelsea Winners 2–1 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica Amsterdam Arena
2013–14 Wigan Athletic 4th in group stageN/A Flag of Russia.svg Rubin Kazan, Flag of Slovenia.svg Maribor, Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Zulte Waregem
Swansea City Round of 321–3 Flag of Italy.svg Napoli 0–0 at Liberty Stadium
1–3 at Stadio San Paolo
Tottenham Hotspur Round of 163–5 Flag of Portugal.svg Benfica 1–3 at White Hart Lane
2–2 at Estádio da Luz
2014–15 Hull City Play-off round2–2 (a) Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Lokeren 0–1 at Daknamstadion
2–1 at KC Stadium
Tottenham Hotspur Round of 321–3 Flag of Italy.svg Fiorentina 1–1 White Hart Lane
0–2 at Stadio Artemio Franchi
Liverpool 1–1 (4–5 p) Flag of Turkey.svg Beşiktaş 1–0 at Anfield
0–1 at Atatürk Olympic Stadium
Everton Round of 164–6 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv 2–1 at Goodison Park
2–5 at Olympic Stadium
2015–16 West Ham United Third qualifying round3–4 Flag of Romania.svg Astra Giurgiu 2–2 at Boleyn Ground
1–2 at Stadionul Marin Anastasovici
Southampton Play-off round1–2 Flag of Denmark.svg Midtjylland 1–1 at St Mary's Stadium
0–1 at MCH Arena
Tottenham Hotspur Round of 161–5 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund 0–3 at Signal Iduna Park
1–2 at White Hart Lane
Manchester United 1–3 Flag of England.svg Liverpool 0–2 at Anfield
1–1 at Old Trafford
Liverpool Final 1–3 Flag of Spain.svg Sevilla St. Jakob-Park
2016–17 West Ham United Play-off round1–2 Flag of Romania.svg Astra Giurgiu 1–1 at Stadionul Marin Anastasovici
0–1 at Olympic Stadium
Southampton 3rd in group stageN/A Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague, Flag of Israel.svg Hapoel Be'er Sheva, Flag of Italy.svg Inter Milan
Tottenham Hotspur Round of 322–3 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Gent 0–1 at Ghelamco Arena
2–2 at Wembley Stadium
Manchester United Winners 2–0 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax Friends Arena
2017–18 Everton 3rd in group stageN/A Flag of Italy.svg Atalanta, Flag of France.svg Lyon, Flag of Cyprus.svg Apollon Limassol
Arsenal Semi-finals1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 1–1 at Emirates Stadium
0–1 at Wanda Metropolitano
2018–19 Burnley Play-off round2–4 Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos 1–3 at Karaiskakis Stadium
1–1 at Turf Moor
Arsenal Final 1–4 Flag of England.svg Chelsea Baku Olympic Stadium
Chelsea Winners 4–1 Flag of England.svg Arsenal
2019–20 Arsenal Round of 322–2 (a, a.e.t.) Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos 1–0 at Karaiskakis Stadium
1–2 at Emirates Stadium
Wolverhampton Wanderers Quarter-finals0–1 Flag of Spain.svg Sevilla MSV-Arena
Manchester United Semi-finals1–2
2020–21 Leicester City Round of 320–2 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague 0–0 at Sinobo Stadium
0–2 at King Power Stadium
Tottenham Hotspur Round of 162–3 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Croatia.svg Dinamo Zagreb 2–0 at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium
0–3 at Stadion Maksimir
Arsenal Semi-finals1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Villarreal 1–2 at Estadio de la Cerámica
0–0 at Emirates Stadium
Manchester United Final 1–1 (10–11 p) Stadion Miejski
  1. England had no coefficient points as a result of the Heysel ban, so only one club was granted entry.
  2. England had only one year of coefficient points as a result of the Heysel ban, so only one club was granted entry.
  3. England had only two years of coefficient points as a result of the Heysel ban, so only two clubs were granted entry.
  4. England had only three years of coefficient points as a result of the Heysel ban, so only two clubs were granted entry.
  5. England had only four years of coefficient points as a result of the Heysel ban, so only three clubs were granted entry.
  6. England had the full five years of coefficient points but the limited berths from previous seasons affected their ranking, leaving them with three entrants. The introduction of the UEFA Intertoto Cup and the UEFA Fair Play ranking for 1995–96 allowed more UEFA Cup berths to open up.
  7. England initially gained a UEFA Cup berth through the UEFA Fair Play ranking but it was revoked as punishment for its clubs fielding weakened teams in the 1995 UEFA Intertoto Cup.

UEFA Super Cup

English clubs have won the competition eight times and taken part on ten other occasions (only two clubs qualify).

YearClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
1977 Liverpool Winners 7–1 Flag of Germany.svg Hamburger SV 1–1 at Volksparkstadion
6–0 at Anfield
1978 Liverpool Runners-up 3–4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 1–3 at Parc Astrid
2–1 at Anfield
1979 Nottingham Forest Winners 2–1 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 1–0 at City Ground
1–1 at Camp Nou
1980 Nottingham Forest Runners-up 2–2 (a) Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 2–1 at City Ground
0–1 at Estadio Luís Casanova
1981(Liverpool) – no match played v Dinamo Tbilisi
1982 Aston Villa Winners 3–1 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 0–1 at Camp Nou
3–0 at Villa Park
1984 Liverpool Runners-up 0–2 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus Stadio Comunale, Turin
1985Banned (Everton) – no match played v Juventus
1991 Manchester United Winners 1–0 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Red Star Belgrade Old Trafford, Manchester
1994 Arsenal Runners-up 1–3 Flag of Italy.svg Milan 1–1 at Highbury
0–2 at San Siro
1998 Chelsea Winners 1–0 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid Stade Louis II, Monte Carlo
1999 Manchester United Runners-up 0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Lazio
2001 Liverpool Winners 3–2 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
2005 Liverpool Winners 3–1 ( a.e.t. ) Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow
2008 Manchester United Runners-up 1–2 Flag of Russia.svg Zenit Saint Petersburg
2012 Chelsea Runners-up 1–4 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid
2013 Chelsea Runners-up 2–2 ( a.e.t. )
(4–5 pen.)
Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich Eden Aréna, Prague
2017 Manchester United Runners-up 1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Real Madrid Philip II Arena, Skopje
2019 Liverpool Winners 2–2 ( a.e.t. )
(5–4 pen.)
Flag of England.svg Chelsea Vodafone Park, Istanbul
Chelsea Runners-up 2–2 ( a.e.t. )
(4–5 pen.)
Flag of England.svg Liverpool

    Inter-Cities Fairs Cup

    English clubs won the competition four times and reached the final on four other occasions.

    SeasonClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
    1955–58 Birmingham City Semi-finals1–2 (Playoff) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona Nuevo Estadio
    London XI Final 2–82–2 at Stamford Bridge
    0–6 at Nuevo Estadio
    1958–60 Chelsea Quarter-finals2–4 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Belgrade XI 1–0 at Stamford Bridge
    1–4 at Belgrade
    Birmingham City Final 1–4 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 0–0 at St Andrew's
    1–4 at Camp Nou
    1960–61 Birmingham City Final 2–4 Flag of Italy.svg Roma 2–2 at St Andrew's
    0–2 at Stadio Olimpico
    1961–62 Nottingham Forest First round1–7 Flag of Spain.svg Valencia 0–2 at Mestalla
    1–5 at City Ground
    Birmingham City Second round3–5 Flag of Spain.svg Espanyol 2–5 at Estadi de Sarrià
    1–0 at St Andrew's
    Sheffield Wednesday Quarter-finals3–4 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 3–2 at Hillsborough Stadium
    0–2 at Camp Nou
    1962–63 Everton First round1–2 Flag of Scotland.svg Dunfermline Athletic 1–0 at Goodison Park
    0–2 at East End Park
    1963–64 Arsenal Second round2–4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg RFC Liège 1–1 at Highbury
    1–3 at Liège
    Sheffield Wednesday 3–5 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Köln 2–3 at Müngersdorfer Stadion
    1–2 at Hillsborough Stadium
    1964–65 Everton Third round2–3 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 1–1 at Old Trafford
    1–2 at Goodison Park
    Manchester United Semi-finals1–2 (play-off) Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros Stadion Albert Flórián
    1965–66 Everton Second round2–4 Flag of Hungary.svg Újpesti Dozsa 0–3 at Szusza Ferenc Stadium
    2–1 at Goodison Park
    Chelsea Semi-finals0–5 (play-off) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona Camp Nou
    Leeds United 1–3 (play-off) Flag of Spain.svg Zaragoza Elland Road
    1966–67 West Bromwich Albion Third round1–6 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna 0–3 at Stadio Renato Dall'Ara
    1–3 at The Hawthorns
    Burnley Quarter-finals2–3 Flag of Germany.svg Eintracht Frankfurt 1–1 at Waldstadion
    1–2 at Turf Moor
    Leeds United Final 0–2 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Dinamo Zagreb 0–2 at Maksimir Stadium
    0–0 at Elland Road
    1967–68 Nottingham Forest Second round2–2 (a) Flag of Switzerland.svg Zürich 2–1 at City Ground
    0–1 at Letzigrund
    Liverpool Third round0–2 Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros 0–1 at Stadion Albert Flórián
    0–1 at Anfield
    Leeds United Winners 1–01–0 at Elland Road
    0–0 at Népstadion
    1968–69 Liverpool First round3–3 (coin toss) Flag of Spain.svg Athletic Bilbao 1–2 at San Mamés
    2–1 at Anfield
    Chelsea Second round0–0 (coin toss) Flag of the Netherlands.svg DWS 0–0 at Stamford Bridge
    0–0 at Spieringhorn
    Leeds United 0–3 Flag of Hungary.svg Újpesti Dozsa 0–1 at Elland Road
    0–2 at Szusza Ferenc Stadium
    Newcastle United Winners 6–23–0 at St James' Park
    3–2 at Szusza Ferenc Stadium
    1969–70 Liverpool Second round3–3 (a) Flag of Portugal.svg Vitória de Setúbal 0–1 at Estádio do Bonfim
    3–2 at Anfield
    Southampton Third round1–1 (a) Flag of England.svg Newcastle United 0–0 at St James' Park
    1–1 at The Dell
    Newcastle United Quarter-finals3–3 (a) Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 0–2 at Parc Astrid
    3–1 at St James' Park
    Arsenal Winners 4–31–3 at Parc Astrid
    3–0 at Highbury
    1970–71 Coventry City Second round3–7 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–6 at Grünwalder Stadion
    2–1 at Highfield Road
    Newcastle United 2–2 (2–5 p) Flag of Hungary.svg Pécsi Dózsa 2–0 at St James' Park
    0–2 at Stadion PMFC
    Arsenal Quarter-finals2–2 (a) Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Köln 2–1 at Highbury
    0–1 at Müngersdorfer Stadion
    Liverpool Semi-finals0–1 Flag of England.svg Leeds United 0–1 at Anfield
    0–0 at Elland Road
    Leeds United Winners 3–3 (a) Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 2–2 at Stadio Comunale di Torino
    1–1 at Elland Road
    1971 Leeds United Runners-up1–2 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Barcelona Single match play-off between the most successful clubs to decide the permanent keepers of the trophy; played at Camp Nou, Barcelona.

      UEFA Cup Winners' Cup

      English clubs won the competition eight times and reached the final on five other occasions.

      SeasonClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
      1960–61 Wolverhampton Wanderers Semi-final1–3 Flag of Scotland.svg Rangers 0–2 at Ibrox Park
      1–1 at Molineux Stadium
      1961–62 Leicester City First round1–3 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Atlético Madrid 1–1 at Filbert Street
      0–2 at Estadio Metropolitano
      1962–63 Tottenham Hotspur Winners 5–1 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Atlético Madrid De Kuip, Rotterdam
      1963–64 Second round3–4 Flag of England.svg Manchester United 2–0 at Parc Lescure
      1–4 at Old Trafford
      Manchester United Quarter-finals4–6 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 4–1 at Old Trafford
      0–5 at Estádio José Alvalade
      1964–65 West Ham United Winners 2–0 Flag of Germany.svg 1860 Munich Wembley, London
      1965–66 Semi-final2–5 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund 1–2 at Boleyn Ground
      1–3 at Stadion Rote Erde
      Liverpool Final 1–2
      ( a.e.t. )
      Hampden Park, Glasgow
      1966–67 Everton Second round1–2 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Zaragoza 0–2 at La Romareda
      1–0 at Goodison Park
      1967–68 Tottenham Hotspur Second round4–4 (a) Flag of France.svg Lyon 0–1 at Parc Lescure
      4–3 at White Hart Lane
      1968–69 West Bromwich Albion Quarter-finals0–1 Flag of Scotland.svg Dunfermline Athletic 0–0 at The Hawthorns
      0–1 at East End Park
      1969–70 Manchester City Winners 2–1 Flag of Poland.svg Górnik Zabrze Praterstadion, Vienna
      1970–71 Semi-final1–3 Flag of England.svg Chelsea 0–1 at Stamford Bridge
      0–1 at Maine Road
      Chelsea Winners 2–1 Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg Real Madrid Karaiskakis Stadium, Piraeus
      Replay after 1–1 draw at same venue
      1971–72 Second round1–1 (a) Flag of Sweden.svg Åtvidaberg 0–0 at Kopparvallen
      1–1 at Stamford Bridge
      Liverpool 1–3 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 0–0 at Anfield
      1–3 at Grünwalder Stadion
      1972–73 Leeds United Final 0–1 Flag of Italy.svg Milan Kaftanzoglio Stadium, Thessaloniki
      1973–74 Sunderland Second round2–3 Flag of Portugal.svg Sporting CP 2–1 at Roker Park
      0–2 at Estádio José Alvalade
      1974–75 Liverpool Second round1–1 (a) Flag of Hungary.svg Ferencváros 1–1 at Anfield
      0–0 at Stadion Albert Flórián
      1975–76 West Ham United Final 2–4 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht Heysel Stadium, Brussels
      1976–77 Southampton Quarter-finals2–3 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 0–2 at Émile Versé Stadium
      2–1 at The Dell
      1977–78 Manchester United Second round5–6 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto 0–4 at Estadio Das Antas
      5–2 at Old Trafford
      1978–79 Ipswich Town Quarter-final2–2 (a) Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 2–1 at Portman Road
      0–1 at Camp Nou
      1979–80 Arsenal Final 0–0 ( a.e.t. )
      (4–5 pen.)
      Flag of Spain.svg Valencia Heysel Stadium, Brussels
      1980–81 West Ham United Quarter-final2–4 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Dinamo Tbilisi 1–4 at Boleyn Ground
      1–0 at Lenin Dinamo Stadium
      1981–82 Tottenham Hotspur Semi-final1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona 1–1 at White Hart Lane
      0–1 at Camp Nou
      1982–83 Second round2–5 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich 1–1 at White Hart Lane
      1–4 at Olympiastadion
      1983–84 Manchester United Semi-final2–3 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus 1–1 at Old Trafford
      1–2 at Stadio Comunale
      1984–85 Everton Winners 2–1 Flag of Austria.svg Rapid Wien De Kuip, Rotterdam
      1985–86 Banned (Manchester United)
      1986–87 Banned (Everton)
      1987–88 Banned (Coventry City)
      1988–89 Banned (Wimbledon)
      1989–90 Banned (Liverpool)
      1990–91 Manchester United Winners 2–1 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona De Kuip, Rotterdam
      1991–92 Second Round1–4 Flag of Spain.svg Atlético Madrid 0–3 at Vicente Calderon
      1–1 at Old Trafford
      Tottenham Hotspur Quarter-final0–1 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Feyenoord 0–1 at De Kuip
      0–0 at White Hart Lane
      1992–93 Liverpool Second round2–6 Flag of Russia.svg Spartak Moscow 2–4 at Luzhniki
      0–2 at Anfield
      1993–94 Arsenal Winners 1–0 Flag of Italy.svg Parma Parken, Copenhagen
      1994–95 Chelsea Semi-final3–4 Flag of Spain.svg Zaragoza 0–3 at La Romareda
      3–1 at Stamford Bridge
      Arsenal Final 1–2
      ( a.e.t. )
      Parc des Princes, Paris
      1995–96 Everton Second round0–1 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Feyenoord 0–0 at Goodison Park
      0–1 at De Kuip
      1996–97 Liverpool Semi-final2–3 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain 0–3 at Parc des Princes
      2–0 at Anfield
      1997–98 Chelsea Winners 1–0 Flag of Germany.svg VfB Stuttgart Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm
      1998–99 Newcastle United First Round2–2 (a) Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg Partizan 2–1 at St James' Park
      0–1 at Partizan Stadium
      Chelsea Semi-final1–2 Flag of Spain.svg Mallorca 1–1 at Stamford Bridge
      0–1 at Estadio Lluís Sitjar

        UEFA Intertoto Cup

        YearClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
        1995 Sheffield Wednesday 2nd in group stageN/A Flag of Germany.svg Karlsruher SC, Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel, Flag of Denmark.svg AGF, Flag of Poland.svg Górnik Zabrze
        Tottenham Hotspur 4th in group stageN/A Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Köln, Flag of Switzerland.svg Luzern, Flag of Sweden.svg Östers IF, Flag of Slovenia.svg Rudar Velenje
        Wimbledon Flag of Turkey.svg Bursaspor, Flag of Slovakia.svg Košice, Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Charleroi, Flag of Israel.svg Beitar Jerusalem
        1996 No entrants
        1997
        1998 Crystal Palace Third round0–4 Flag of Turkey.svg Samsunspor 0–2 at Selhurst Park
        0–2 at Samsun 19 Mayıs Stadium
        1999 West Ham United Winners3–2 Flag of France.svg Metz 0–1 at Boleyn Ground
        3–1 at Stade Saint-Symphorien
        2000 Bradford City Fourth round0–4 Flag of Russia.svg Zenit Saint Petersburg 0–1 at Petrovsky Stadium
        0–3 at Valley Parade
        Aston Villa Fourth round1–3 Flag of Spain.svg Celta Vigo 0–1 at Balaídos
        1–2 at Villa Park
        2001 Newcastle United Final4–4 (a) Flag of France.svg Troyes 0–0 at Stade de l'Aube
        4–4 at St James' Park
        Aston Villa Winners5–2 Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel 1–1 at St. Jakob-Park
        4–1 at Villa Park
        2002 Fourth round1–3 Flag of France.svg Lille 1–1 at Stade Grimonprez-Jooris
        0–2 at Villa Park
        Fulham Winners5–3 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna 2–2 at Stadio Renato Dall'Ara
        3–1 at Craven Cottage
        2003 No entrants
        2004
        2005 Newcastle United Fourth round2–4 Flag of Spain.svg Deportivo La Coruña 1–2 at Estadio Riazor
        1–2 at St James' Park
        2006 Winners4–1 Flag of Norway.svg Lillestrøm 1–1 at St James' Park
        3–0 at Åråsen Stadion
        2007 Blackburn Rovers Won in third round6–0 Flag of Lithuania.svg Vėtra 2–0 at Vėtra Stadium
        4–0 at Ewood Park
        2008 Aston Villa Won in third round3–2 Flag of Denmark.svg Odense 2–2 at Fionia Park
        1–0 at Villa Park

        Performance summary by competition

        European Cup and UEFA Champions League

        The UEFA Champions League (previously known as the European Cup) is a seasonal club football competition organised by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) since 1955 for the most successful football clubs in Europe. The prize, the European Champion Clubs' Cup, is considered the most prestigious club trophy in the sport.

        As of the end of the 2020–21 UEFA Champions League season, English clubs have fourteen European Cup wins. The most recent English win came in 2021 when Chelsea defeated Manchester City 1–0 at the Estádio do Dragão. A record five English clubs have won Europe's premier club competition: Liverpool six times, the first English team to retain the cup (1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 2005 and 2019), Manchester United three times and the first English team to win the European Cup (1968, 1999 and 2008), Nottingham Forest twice, being the second English team to retain the European Cup (1979 and 1980), Chelsea twice (2012 and 2021) and Aston Villa once (1982). English clubs also hold the records for the most consecutive tournament victories by clubs from one country (six wins between 1977 and 1982 by Liverpool, Forest and Villa) as well as the most consecutive defeats in the final (four teams were runners-up once each between 2006 and 2009).

        Wolves' formative steps

        Wolverhampton Wanderers were a dominant English side in the 1950s, being League champions three times (1953–54, 1957–58 and 1958–59), under the management of Stan Cullis. Wolves also finished League runners-up on five occasions, most recently in 1959–60. In 1954, before anyone had really expanded the borders of domestic football, after recently winning the first division for the first time Wolves thought they would test themselves against Hungarian giants Honved.

        At the time, Honved had Ferenc Puskás, who was a star player on the world stage. The match was part of Wolves' series of 'floodlit friendlies' which turned out to be the spark that created the European Cup as it came to be known. Wolves won 3–2, playing under the rare sight of floodlights in England, and it attracted attention all over Europe. The game was also broadcast live on the BBC and would become possibly the moment that the European Cup was truly born.

        Wolves had also beaten a Spartak Moscow side earlier in the series, and the Daily Mail crowned them 'champions of the world' after sinking the Hungarians. But Gabriel Hanon, editor of L'Equipe at the time, hit back, saying the English side needed to win in Budapest or Moscow before they could claim that title. Hanon was at Molineux for the match and enjoyed it so much he started a campaign to introduce a competition where Europe’s elite clubs would face off against each other regularly.

        Early years: 1955–1967

        As champions of The Football League in 1954–55, Chelsea were scheduled to become England's representatives in the inaugural European Champions' Cup competition, to be staged the following season. Indeed, they were drawn to face Swedish champions Djurgården in the first round. However, Chelsea were denied by the intervention of the Football League, in particular their secretary Alan Hardaker, who persuaded them to withdraw. [9] [10]

        Instead, the 1955–56 league champions, Manchester United, became the first English club to compete in the new competition. They faced R.S.C. Anderlecht in the preliminary round, winning the first leg 2–0 away from home. Dennis Viollet scored the opening goal, the first for an English club in the European Cup, and he went on to become the tournament's top scorer that season, scoring nine goals. Four goals from Viollet and a hat-trick from Tommy Taylor helped United to achieve a 10–0 second leg victory as they progressed 12–0 on aggregate. [11] United's first three home ties of the competition were played at Manchester City's Maine Road ground, since the floodlights at Old Trafford were still in the process of being installed and were not switched on until March 1957. [12] After next eliminating Borussia Dortmund and Athletic Bilbao, United lost to holders Real Madrid in the semi-final, 5–3 on aggregate. [11] They did retain their league title however, to ensure their place in the following season's European Cup.

        Tottenham Hotspur reached the semi-finals of the 1961–62 tournament, but were knocked out by Benfica.

        The next two seasons were less successful in terms of progress by English clubs. Ipswich Town began the 1962–63 competition with a 14–1 aggregate victory over Floriana (including a 10–0 second leg win), but lost in the first round to A.C. Milan, who went on to win the final at Wembley. A year later Everton were beaten by another Milan club, Internazionale, in the preliminary round.

        Manchester United win at Wembley: 1967–1976

        Wembley Stadium was the venue for two English victories in the European Cup: Manchester United won there in 1968, as did Liverpool ten years later. Old Wembley Stadium (external view).jpg
        Wembley Stadium was the venue for two English victories in the European Cup: Manchester United won there in 1968, as did Liverpool ten years later.

        Leeds United centre forward Mick Jones was the top scorer in the 1969–70 tournament; his eight goals helped his club to reach the semi-final stage, where they lost to Celtic. Jones scored a hat-trick in Leeds' 10–0 first round first leg win over Lyn Oslo, a match in which his team mate Michael O'Grady had opened the scoring after just 35 seconds, at the time believed to be the fastest goal in European Cup history. [13] In 1970–71, Everton reached the quarter-final, where they lost to Panathinaikos on the away goals rule. In the early rounds, Everton had won the competition's first ever penalty shootout when they eliminated Borussia Mönchengladbach. [14] Arsenal made their first European Cup appearance in 1971–72. They were knocked out in the quarter-finals by Ajax, who went on to win the second of three consecutive European Cups, while Arsenal would not feature in the competition for another twenty years. In 1975, Leeds United faced Bayern Munich, of Germany in the final of the tournament in Paris. The game emerged as one of the most controversial matches in football history as it transpired that match fixing played a part in the latter's 2-0 victory with both goals benefiting from dubious refereeing decisions. Leeds United supporters often sing at both home and away matches proclaiming themselves 'champions of Europe,' after feeling aggrieved by the injustice of that night.

        Derby County returned to the competition in 1975–76, but this time were defeated at the second round stage by Real Madrid. A Charlie George hat-trick gave Derby a 4–1 first leg victory, but Madrid progressed thanks to a 5–1 extra time win in the second leg. [15]

        English domination: 1976–1984

        Liverpool led the way with domination. Beating any team out in front of them, they were unstoppable. Whereas the early to mid-1970s had seen three successive European Cup victories each for Ajax and Bayern Munich, the competition was dominated by English clubs in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Between 1977 and 1982, English teams won a record six successive finals. The sequence began when Liverpool, managed by Bob Paisley, beat Borussia Mönchengladbach 3–1 in the 1977 European Cup Final, in what was striker Kevin Keegan's last game for the club. [16] Keegan's replacement Kenny Dalglish scored the only goal of the 1978 final against Club Brugge as Liverpool became the first English club to retain the trophy. [17] Meanwhile, Brian Clough's Nottingham Forest had succeeded Liverpool as English champions, and the two teams faced each other in the first round of the 1978–79 European Cup in the first meeting of two English clubs in the competition. Nottingham Forest won the tie on the way to reaching the final, where they beat Malmö 1–0. Forest was the third club to win the tournament at their first attempt, after Real Madrid in 1955–56 and Internazionale in 1963–64. [18]

        Liverpool was again eliminated in the first round in 1979–80, while Forest retained the trophy, beating Hamburg 1–0 in the final. The following season it was Nottingham Forest's turn to make a first round exit as Liverpool went all the way to the final, where they beat Real Madrid 1–0 to secure their third European Cup under Bob Paisley. Liverpool's Terry McDermott and Graeme Souness were the tournament's joint top scorers, alongside Bayern Munich's Karl-Heinz Rummenigge, with six goals apiece. [19] Liverpool failed to retain the trophy on this occasion as they were beaten in the quarter-finals by CSKA Sofia in the 1981–82 competition. A sixth successive English victory was still achieved however, as Aston Villa, playing in the European Cup for the first time, beat Bayern Munich 1–0 in the final in Rotterdam. [20] The run of victories by English clubs came to an end in 1982–83 when both Liverpool and Aston Villa went out at the quarter-final stage after losing to Widzew Łódź and Juventus respectively. [21] In the 1983–84 competition, Liverpool once again reached the final, where they faced Roma in the latter's home stadium, the Stadio Olimpico. The match finished 1–1 after extra time and Liverpool won the subsequent penalty shootout (4–2) to lift their fourth European Cup. It was the first time that the final had been settled by spot kicks. [22]

        Heysel and its repercussions: 1984–1992

        Liverpool's participation in the 1984–85 European Cup marked their ninth successive season in the competition. They again made it to the final, but lost out 1–0 to Juventus after Michel Platini scored a second-half penalty. 1985 was the year of the Heysel Stadium disaster, which led to all English clubs being banned from the European Cup.

        In the 1991–92 season, Arsenal were the first team to represent England in the European Cup after English teams were allowed back in. Arsenal lost out over two legs in the second round to Benfica.

        1990s: Champions League introduced

        Ole Gunnar Solskjaer scored the winning goal for Manchester United in the 1999 Champions League Final. Solskjaer cropped.jpg
        Ole Gunnar Solskjær scored the winning goal for Manchester United in the 1999 Champions League Final.

        The 1992–93 season saw the competition rebranded as the UEFA Champions League, a move that formalised the mini-league format that had been introduced the previous year. [23] After winning the inaugural Premier League title, Manchester United entered the Champions League in 1993–94, the first time in a quarter of a century that they had played in European football's leading club competition. United failed to reach the group stage however, losing out on away goals to Galatasaray following a 3–3 aggregate scoreline in their second round tie. [24]

        A further change to the competition occurred in 1994–95, when the first and second rounds were replaced by four mini-leagues of four teams each, with the top two teams in each group progressing to the quarter-finals. [25] As one of eight seeded teams, Manchester United were given a bye directly to the group stage, but missed out on the quarter-finals after finishing third, behind Barcelona on goal difference. [26] In 1995–96, Blackburn Rovers were England's Champions League representatives, but their campaign was not a successful one as they won just one of their six group games and failed to qualify for the latter stages. [27]

        Manchester United's return to the Champions League in 1996–97 was the first of 18 consecutive seasons in which Manchester United qualified to enter the competition. They progressed through the group stages for the first time and went on to reach the semi-final, losing to eventual winners Borussia Dortmund. [28] United topped their mini-league in the following season's group stages, [29] but were defeated by AS Monaco on away goals in the quarter-finals. [30] Also representing England in 1997–98 were Newcastle United, after the runners-up from Europe's top eight leagues were allowed to enter for the first time. [31] Newcastle successfully negotiated the second qualifying round, but could only finish third in their group, despite a victory over Barcelona in the opening group game. [32]

        2000s: rise to European dominance and subsequent decline

        Premier League teams gradually improved their performance in the Champions League until a peak centred on the 2008 season, followed by a significant decline thereafter. They had no semi-finalists for the first four seasons (1993 to 1996). They then had four semi-finalists (Manchester United in 1997, 1999, and 2002, and Leeds United in 2001) over the next seven seasons (1997 to 2003), one of whom went on to become champions (Manchester United in 1999). They then had four semi-finalists (Chelsea in 2004 and 2005, Liverpool in 2005, and Arsenal in 2006) in the next three seasons (2004 to 2006), with Arsenal going on to be runners-up in 2006 and Liverpool winning in 2005.

        They then peaked with nine semi-finalists (Chelsea, Manchester United and Liverpool in both 2007 and 2008, and Chelsea, Manchester United and Arsenal in 2009) in the next three seasons (2007 to 2009), with Liverpool (2007), Chelsea (2008), and Manchester United (2009) going on to be runners-up, and Manchester United going on to win an all-English final against Chelsea in 2008, a year in which none of the four English teams were eliminated by anybody except another English team. Around this time, then-UEFA president Michel Platini began to make statements which resulted in a widespread perception that he was anti-English, [33] which some attributed to his alleged fear of English domination in European club competition. [34] [35]

        However, this dominance did not produce a corresponding number of titles. At its most dominant, from 2007 to 2009, the Premier League had 75% (9 out of 12) of the semi-finalists, 67% (4 out of 6) of the finalists, 100% (3 out of 3) of the runners-up, but only 33% (1 out of 3) of the winners (Manchester United in 2008), with the other two titles going to Milan in 2007 and Barcelona in 2009. And English dominance did not last, with the Premier League managing only two semi-finalists (Manchester United in 2011, and Chelsea in 2012) over the next four seasons (2010 to 2013), although Manchester United went on to be runners-up in 2011, and Chelsea won in 2012. In 2013, no Premier League side reached the last eight for the first time since 1996 (in a time when England were only entitled to one Champions League place compared to 2013's four), only two (Manchester United and Arsenal) made it to the last 16, and Chelsea became the first defending champions to fail to make it past the group stage of the Champions League, [36] although by finishing third in their group they did manage to qualify for the UEFA Europa League, which they went on to win.

        At that time, it was noted that if the decline continued for long enough, it could in theory eventually deprive the Premier League of its entitlement to have four teams in the Champions League each year, which it has had since 2005, but the coefficient tables gave little cause for concern from an English perspective, as all England's relevant coefficients were ahead of fourth-placed Italy's, and this did not change until 2018, when the quotas were adjusted by UEFA to guarantee four Champions League places to each of the top four nations, with those clubs going into the Group stage directly rather than having to navigate qualifying rounds. [37]

        The downward trend was reversed in 2018–19, when all four Premier League entrants (including Liverpool, who had reached the 2018 final) progressed to the quarter-finals. Despite the general decline in the levels of success from what English clubs had enjoyed a decade earlier, and the consistent high levels for other nations, particularly Spain, England remains the only nation to have four of the last eight participants in the competition, with 2018–19 joining 2007–08 and 2008–09 in that regard (Liverpool and Manchester United were involved in all three campaigns). [38] In addition, English sides sealed all of the final places in both UEFA competitions in that season.

        English finalists in European Cup and UEFA Champions League

        This table combines the English totals before and during the Premier League era. It shows that Liverpool lead, with six wins. Manchester United won the unofficial club world championship, the Intercontinental Cup, in 1999, and the official FIFA Club World Cup in 2008. [39]

        Performance by clubs
        ClubWinnersRunners-upYears wonYears runners-up
        Liverpool 63 1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 2005, 2019 1985, 2007, 2018
        Manchester United 32 1968, 1999, 2008 2009, 2011
        Chelsea 21 2012, 2021 2008
        Nottingham Forest 20 1979, 1980
        Aston Villa 10 1982
        Leeds United 01 1975
        Arsenal 01 2006
        Tottenham Hotspur 01 2019
        Manchester City 01 2021

        Performance record and ranking of Premier League clubs in UEFA Champions League

        RankClubBest Result 92–93 93–94 94–95 95–96 96–97 97–98 98–99 99–00 00–01 01–02 02–03 03–04 04–05 05–06 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 19–20 20–21 21–22
        1 Manchester United W (x2)AR16G16ASFQF W QFQFSFQFR16R16G32SF W RU QF RU G32R16QFAG32AR16QFAG32
        2 Liverpool W (x2)AAAAAAAAAQFG32A W R16 RU SFQFG32AAAAG32AA RU W R16QF
        3 Chelsea W (x2)AAAAAAAQFAAASFSFR16SF RU SFR16QF W G32SFR16R16AR16AR16 W
        4 Arsenal RUAAAAAAG24G32QFG16G16QFR16 RU R16QFSFQFR16R16R16R16R16R16R16AAAAA
        5 Manchester City RUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAG32G32R16R16SFR16QFQFQF RU
        6 Tottenham Hotspur RUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAQFAAAAAG32R16 RU R16AA
        7 Leeds United SFR16AAAAAAASFAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
        8 Leicester City QFAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAQFAAAAA
        9 Newcastle United G16AAAAAG24AAAAG16QAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
        10 Blackburn Rovers G16AAAG16AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
        11 Everton QAAAAAAAAAAAAAQAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

        Gnn = Reached the Group phase with "nn" teams left.
        Rnn = Reached the knockout phase, with "nn" teams left.
        Q = Knocked out in qualifying and did not reach the main tournament.

        FIFA Club World Cup

        The FIFA Club World Cup (or the FIFA Club World Championship, as it was originally called) has been won by Premier league clubs twice (Manchester United in 2008 and Liverpool in 2019), [39] and they have also been runners-up twice, [40] [41] behind Brazil's Série A with four wins, [40] [41] [42] [43] and Spain's La Liga [44] [45] and Italy's Serie A [46] [47] with two wins each (see table here).

        English clubs in the Intercontinental Cup

        YearClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
        2000 Manchester United Group StageN/A Flag of Brazil.svg Vasco da Gama, Flag of Mexico.svg Necaxa, Flag of Australia (converted).svg South Melbourne Estádio do Maracanã, Rio de Janeiro
        2005 Liverpool Runners-up 0–1 Flag of Brazil.svg São Paulo International Stadium, Yokohama
        2008 Manchester United Winners 1–0 Flag of Ecuador.svg LDU Quito
        2012 Chelsea Runners-up 0–1 Flag of Brazil.svg Corinthians
        2019 Liverpool Winners 1–0
        ( a.e.t. )
        Flag of Brazil.svg Flamengo Khalifa International Stadium, Doha

        Premier League Club World Cup finalists

        Liverpool lead this table as of 2019, having won in 2019 (after beating Flamengo of Brazil 1–0 after extra time in the Khalifa International Stadium in Doha, Qatar), and having been runners-up in 2005, losing to São Paulo of Brazil 1–0 in Yokohama, Japan. Before Liverpool's win in 2019, Manchester United led this table, having defeated LDU Quito of Ecuador 1–0 in Yokohama, Japan, in 2008. Chelsea lost to Corinthians of Brazil 1–0 in the same stadium in 2012. Manchester United also took part in the first FIFA Club World Championship in 2000, but were eliminated at the group stage after finishing third in their group. [48] [49]

        Performance by club
        ClubWonRunner-upYears wonYears runners-up
        Liverpool 11 2019 2005
        Manchester United 10 2008
        Chelsea 01 2012

        Intercontinental Cup

        Before being supplanted by the FIFA Club World Cup, the now defunct Intercontinental Cup served as a de facto annual world club championship contested by the European and South American club champions. Manchester United won it in 1999, the only time a Premier League club took part in the cup. This was a marked improvement on the performance of English teams before the Premier League era, when English clubs contested the cup on five occasions (1968, 1980, 1981, 1982 and 1984), losing each time, and allowing South America to finish with 22 wins, one ahead of Europe's 21 (see table here).

        Additionally, English clubs have initially qualified for the Intercontinental Cup but withdrew from participation, namely Liverpool in 1977 and Nottingham Forest in 1979. Both berths were eventually taken by the respective European Cup losing finalists. Liverpool also qualified for the 1978 edition but they and opponents Boca Juniors declined to play each other, making it a no contest.

        English clubs in the Intercontinental Cup

        YearClubProgressScoreOpponentsVenue(s)
        1968 Manchester United Runners-up1–2 Flag of Argentina.svg Estudiantes 0–1 at La Bombonera, 1–1 at Old Trafford
        1977 Liverpool declined to take part.
        1978 Liverpool declined to take part – no match was played.
        1979 Nottingham Forest declined to take part.
        1980 Nottingham Forest Runners-up0–1 Flag of Uruguay.svg Nacional National Stadium, Tokyo
        1981 Liverpool Runners-up0–3 Flag of Brazil.svg Flamengo
        1982 Aston Villa Runners-up0–2 Flag of Uruguay.svg Peñarol
        1984 Liverpool Runners-up0–1 Flag of Argentina.svg Independiente
        1999 Manchester United Winners1–0 Flag of Brazil.svg Palmeiras

        Intercontinental Cup and FIFA Club World Cup combined

        In the Premier League era, Manchester United under Alex Ferguson have a 67% success rate, having participated in three world tournaments (the Intercontinental Cup in 1999 and the FIFA Club World Cup in 2000 and 2008), [48] [49] [39] winning two of them (1999 and 2008). [39]

        This 67% success rate compares favourably with the all-time European average of 55.9% success (as of 2019), having won in 33 out of 59 matches (21 out of 43 Intercontinental Cup matches and 12 out of 16 FIFA Club World Cup matches). It is also fairly similar to the European average in the Premier League era (1993 onwards) of 71.4% success as of 2019, having played 28 matches (12 Intercontinental Cup matches from 1993 to 2004 and 16 FIFA Club World Cup matches), and winning 20 (8 Intercontinental Cup matches and 12 FIFA Club World Cup matches).

        In marked contrast, before Liverpool's win in 2019, all other English clubs (including Manchester United in 1968 before the Premier League and Alex Ferguson eras) had a record of 0% success, participating in 7 matches and winning none, losing 5 Intercontinental Cup games before the Premier League era (Manchester United in 1968, Nottingham Forest in 1980, Liverpool in 1981 and 1984 and Aston Villa in 1982), and losing two FIFA Club World Cups in the Premier League era (Liverpool in 2005 and Chelsea in 2012). [40] [41]

        The above data means that when one includes Sir Alex Ferguson's Manchester United and Liverpool's win in 2019, English clubs have success rates of 50% (3 out of 6) in the Premier League era, 0% (0 out of 5) before the Premier League era, and 27% (3 out of 11) overall.

        See also

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