List of record home attendances of English football clubs

Last updated

St Mary's, the home of Southampton, is one of the few club grounds to have set an attendance record in the 21st century. SMS2004 ext.jpg
St Mary's, the home of Southampton, is one of the few club grounds to have set an attendance record in the 21st century.

This is a list of record home attendances of English football clubs. It lists the highest attendance of all 92 current English Football League and Premier League clubs for a home match. It is noticeable that a large proportion of records were set at matches in the FA Cup.

Attendances have noticeably declined since all-seater stadia were introduced in the late 1980s, with many records set at the terraced stadia, with their high standing capacities, that were replaced. In several cases records were achieved at a former ground rather than the club's current location. For example, Wigan Athletic's record was set at Springfield Park, not their current home, the DW Stadium.

The record home attendance for five clubs occurred away from their usual home grounds. Manchester United's record home attendance was set at Maine Road, the home of neighbours Manchester City, during a period when United's Old Trafford was being rebuilt following bomb damage sustained during the Second World War. [1] During the 1998–99 season Arsenal played their UEFA Champions League home matches at Wembley, [2] with the 73,707 attendance against Lens exceeding the record for Highbury and Tottenham Hotspur also played their UEFA Champions League games at Wembley Stadium in the 2016–17 season. [3] Similarly, Accrington Stanley's record home attendance was set when the club played an FA Cup home tie at Blackburn's Ewood Park instead of their usual home (the Crown Ground) and Stevenage's record was set when the club played a "home" FA Cup tie against Birmingham City at Birmingham's St Andrews ground. [4]

List

Records correct as of 23 March 2018. Italics denote attendance record set at ground not designated as usual home ground; Bold denote attendance record set at current ground.

RankClubAttendanceStadiumOppositionCompetitionDateRef
1 Tottenham Hotspur 85,512 Wembley Stadium [lower-alpha 1] Bayer Leverkusen UEFA Champions League group stage 2 November 2016 [5]
2 Manchester City 84,569 Maine Road Stoke City FA Cup sixth round3 March 1934 [6]
3 Chelsea 82,905 Stamford Bridge Arsenal First Division 12 October 1935 [7] [8]
4 Manchester United 81,962 Maine Road [lower-alpha 2] Arsenal First Division 17 January 1948 [9] [10]
5 Everton 78,299 Goodison Park Liverpool First Division 18 September 1948 [11]
6 Aston Villa 76,588 Villa Park Derby County FA Cup sixth round, first leg2 March 1946 [12]
7 Sunderland 75,118 Roker Park Derby County FA Cup sixth round replay8 March 1933 [13]
8 Charlton Athletic 75,031 The Valley Aston Villa FA Cup fifth round12 February 1938 [14]
9 Arsenal 73,707 Wembley Stadium (1923) [lower-alpha 3] RC Lens UEFA Champions League group stage25 November 1998 [3] [16]
10 Sheffield Wednesday 72,841 Hillsborough Stadium Manchester City FA Cup fifth round17 February 1934 [17]
11 Bolton Wanderers 69,912 Burnden Park Manchester City FA Cup fifth round18 February 1933 [18]
12 Newcastle United 68,386 St James' Park Chelsea First Division 3 September 1930 [19]
13 Sheffield United 68,287 Bramall Lane Leeds United FA Cup fifth round15 February 1936 [20]
14 Huddersfield Town 67,037 Leeds Road Arsenal FA Cup sixth round27 February 1932 [21]
15 Birmingham City 66,844 St Andrews Everton FA Cup fifth round11 March 1939 [22]
16 West Bromwich Albion 64,815 The Hawthorns Arsenal FA Cup sixth round6 March 1937 [23]
17 Blackburn Rovers 62,522 Ewood Park Bolton Wanderers FA Cup sixth round2 March 1929 [24]
18 Liverpool 61,905 Anfield Wolverhampton Wanderers FA Cup fourth round2 February 1952 [25]
19 Wolverhampton Wanderers 61,315 Molineux Stadium Liverpool FA Cup fifth round11 February 1939 [26]
20 West Ham United 59,988 London Stadium Everton Premier League 30 March 2019 [27]
21 Cardiff City 57,893 Ninian Park Arsenal First Division 22 April 1953 [28]
22 Leeds United 57,892 Elland Road Sunderland FA Cup fifth round replay15 March 1967 [29]
23 Hull City 55,019 Boothferry Park Manchester United FA Cup sixth round26 February 1949 [30]
24 Burnley 54,775 Turf Moor Huddersfield Town FA Cup third round23 February 1924 [31]
25 Middlesbrough 53,802 Ayresome Park Newcastle United First Division 29 December 1949 [32]
26 Crystal Palace 51,482 Selhurst Park Burnley Second Division 11 May 1979 [33]
27 Coventry City 51,455 Highfield Road Wolverhampton Wanderers Second Division 29 April 1967 [34]
28 Portsmouth 51,385 Fratton Park Derby County FA Cup sixth round26 February 1949 [35]
29 Stoke City 51,380 Victoria Ground Arsenal First Division 29 March 1937 [36]
30 Nottingham Forest 49,946 City Ground Manchester United First Division 28 October 1967 [37]
31 Port Vale 49,768 Vale Park Aston Villa FA Cup fifth round20 February 1960 [38]
32 Fulham 49,335 Craven Cottage Millwall Second Division 8 October 1938 [39]
33 Millwall 48,672 The Den (old) Derby County FA Cup fifth round20 February 1937 [40]
34 Oldham Athletic 47,671 Boundary Park Sheffield Wednesday FA Cup fifth round25 January 1930 [41]
35 Notts County 47,310 Meadow Lane York City FA Cup sixth round12 March 1955 [42]
36 Leicester City 47,298 Filbert Street Tottenham Hotspur FA Cup fifth round18 February 1928 [43]
37 Norwich City 43,984 Carrow Road Leicester City FA Cup sixth round30 March 1963 [44]
38 Plymouth Argyle 43,596 Home Park Aston Villa Second Division 10 October 1936 [45]
39 Bristol City 43,335 Ashton Gate Preston North End FA Cup fifth round16 February 1935 [46]
40 Preston North End 42,684 Deepdale Arsenal First Division 23 April 1938 [47]
41 Derby County 41,826 Baseball Ground Tottenham Hotspur First Division 20 September 1969 [48]
42 Queen's Park Rangers 41,097 White City Stadium Leeds United FA Cup third round9 January 1932 [49]
43 Barnsley 40,255 Oakwell Stadium Stoke City FA Cup fifth round15 February 1936 [50]
44 Bury 40,000 Gigg Lane Manchester City First Division 30 August 1924 [51]
45 Bradford City 39,146 Valley Parade Burnley FA Cup fourth round11 March 1911 [52]
46 Brentford 38,678 Griffin Park Preston North End FA Cup sixth round26 February 1949 [53]
47 Bristol Rovers 38,472 Eastville Stadium Preston North End FA Cup fourth round30 January 1960 [54]
48 Blackpool 38,098 Bloomfield Road Wolverhampton Wanderers First Division 19 September 1955 [55]
49 Ipswich Town 38,010 Portman Road Leeds United FA Cup sixth round8 March 1975 [56]
50 Doncaster Rovers 37,149 Belle Vue Hull City Third Division North 2 October 1948 [57]
51 Brighton & Hove Albion 36,747 Goldstone Ground Fulham Second Division 27 December 1958 [58]
52 Leyton Orient 34,345 Brisbane Road West Ham United FA Cup fourth round25 January 1964 [59]
53 Watford 34,099 Vicarage Road Manchester United FA Cup fourth round replay3 February 1969 [60]
54 Reading 33,042 Elm Park Brentford FA Cup fifth round19 February 1927 [61]
55 Swansea City 32,796 Vetch Field Arsenal FA Cup fourth round17 February 1968 [62]
56 Southampton 32,363 St Mary's Stadium Coventry City Championship 28 April 2012 [63]
57 Swindon Town 32,000 County Ground Arsenal FA Cup third round15 January 1972 [64]
58 Grimsby Town 31,651 Blundell Park Wolverhampton Wanderers FA Cup fifth round20 February 1937 [65]
59 Southend United 31,033 Roots Hall Liverpool FA Cup third round10 January 1979 [66]
60 Chesterfield 30,561 Recreation Ground Tottenham Hotspur FA Cup fifth round12 February 1938 [67]
61 Peterborough United 30,096 London Road Swansea Town FA Cup fifth round20 February 1965 [68]
62 Luton Town 30,069 Kenilworth Road Blackpool FA Cup sixth round replay4 March 1959 [69]
63 Bournemouth 28,799 Dean Court Manchester United FA Cup sixth round2 March 1957 [70]
64 Milton Keynes Dons 28,127 Stadium MK Chelsea FA Cup fourth round31 January 2016 [71]
65 Wigan Athletic 27,526 Springfield Park Hereford United FA Cup second round12 December 1953 [72]
66 Carlisle United 27,500 Brunton Park Birmingham City FA Cup third round5 January 1957 [73]
67 Walsall 25,453 Fellows Park Newcastle United Second Division 29 August 1961 [74]
68 Rotherham United 25,170 Millmoor Sheffield United Second Division 13 December 1952 [75]
69 Northampton Town 24,523 County Ground Fulham First Division 23 April 1966 [76]
70 Rochdale 24,371 Spotland Notts County FA Cup second round10 December 1949 [77]
71 Scunthorpe United 23,935 Old Showground Portsmouth FA Cup fourth round30 January 1954 [78]
72 Gillingham 23,002 Priestfield Stadium Queens Park Rangers FA Cup third round10 January 1948 [79]
73 Oxford United 22,750 Manor Ground Preston North End FA Cup sixth round29 February 1964 [80]
74 Torquay United 21,908 Plainmoor Huddersfield Town FA Cup fourth round29 January 1955 [81]
75 Exeter City 21,014 St James Park Sunderland FA Cup sixth round4 March 1931 [82]
76 Crewe Alexandra 20,000 Gresty Road Tottenham Hotspur FA Cup fourth round30 January 1960 [83]
77 Colchester United 19,072 Layer Road Reading FA Cup first round27 November 1948 [84]
78 Shrewsbury Town 18,917 Gay Meadow Walsall Third Division 26 April 1961 [85]
79 Hartlepool United 17,426 Victoria Park Manchester United FA Cup third round5 January 1957 [86]
80 Yeovil Town 16,318 Huish Athletic Ground Sunderland FA Cup fourth round29 January 1949 [87]
81 Wycombe Wanderers 15,850 Loakes Park St Albans City FA Amateur Cup fourth round25 February 1950 [88]
82 Stevenage 15,536 St Andrews Birmingham City FA Cup third round4 January 1997 [89]
83 Cambridge United 14,000 Abbey Stadium Chelsea Friendly 1 May 1970 [90]
84 Barnet 11,026 Underhill Stadium Wycombe Wanderers FA Amateur Cup fourth round23 February 1952 [91]
85 Accrington Stanley 10,801 Ewood Park Crewe Alexandra FA Cup second round5 December 1995 [4]
86 Cheltenham Town 10,389 The Athletic Ground Blackpool FA Cup third round13 January 1934 [92]
87 Morecambe 9,383 Christie Park Weymouth FA Cup third round6 January 1962 [93]
88 Aldershot Town 7,500 Recreation Ground Brighton & Hove Albion FA Cup first round18 November 2000 [94]
89 Burton Albion 6,746 Pirelli Stadium Derby County EFL Championship 26 August 2016 [95]
90 Fleetwood Town 6,150 Highbury Stadium Rochdale FA Cup first round13 November 1965 [96]
91 Crawley Town 5,880 Broadfield Stadium Reading FA Cup third round5 January 2013 [97]
92 AFC Wimbledon 4,870 Kingsmeadow Accrington Stanley League Two play-off semi-final, first leg14 May 2016 [98]
Footnotes
  1. 2016-17 European matches played at Wembley due to redevelopment work at Tottenham Hotspur's home ground, White Hart Lane; record at usual stadium 75,038 vs Sunderland (FA Cup 6th round, 5 March 1938).
  2. Match played at Manchester City's home ground, Maine Road, due to World War II bomb damage at Manchester United's ground, Old Trafford.
  3. In order to boost attendance figures, Arsenal was granted permission by UEFA and the Football Association to host their home Champions League matches at Wembley Stadium rather than at their home ground of Highbury. [15]

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