Lincoln City F.C.

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Lincoln City
Lincoln city (2014).png
Full nameLincoln City Football Club
Nickname(s)The Imps
Founded1884;137 years ago (1884)
Ground Sincil Bank
Capacity10,120 [1]
ChairmanClive Nates [2]
Manager Michael Appleton
League League One
2020–21 League One, 5th of 24
Website Club website
Soccerball current event.svg Current season

Lincoln City Football Club is a professional association football club based in the city of Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. The team compete in League One, the third tier of the English football league system. Nicknamed the "Imps" after the legend of the Lincoln Imp, they have played at 10,120-capacity Sincil Bank since their move from John O'Gaunts in 1895. Traditionally they play in red and white striped shirts with black shorts and red and white socks. They hold rivalries with other Lincolnshire clubs, particularly Football League sides Scunthorpe United and Grimsby Town.

Contents

Founded in 1884, Lincoln won the Midland League in 1889–90, their first full season playing league football. They moved on from the Football Alliance to become founder members of the Football League Second Division in 1892, remaining there until they failed re-election in 1908. They won immediate re-election after winning the next year's Midland League, and would repeat this feat after failing re-election again in 1911 and 1920. Founder members of the Football League Third Division North in 1921, they won promotion as champions in 1931–32, but were relegated two seasons later. Crowned Third Division North champions again in 1947–48, they were relegated the next year, but would remain in the second tier for nine seasons after again winning the Third Division North title in 1951–52. Two successive relegations left them in the Fourth Division by 1962, where they would remain until Graham Taylor's title winning campaign of 1975–76.

Relegated in 1978–79, they secured promotion again two years later but suffered a double relegation to find themselves in the Conference by 1987. Lincoln made an immediate recovery however, regaining their Football League status with the Conference title in 1987–88. They were promoted again in 1997–98, but were relegated the next season. They reached the play-offs in five consecutive seasons, from 2002 to 2007, losing in the final twice (2002–03 and 2004–05) and the semi-finals three times, which is a competition record. However they exited the division at the other end when they were returned to the Conference after relegation at the end of the 2010–11 campaign. A six-season stay in non-league was ended when Cowley brothers Nicky and Danny led the club to the National League title in 2016–17, as well as a run to the quarter-finals of the FA Cup – this made them the first non-league side to reach that stage in 103 years. They won the EFL Trophy in 2018 and the League Two title in 2018–19.

History

Chart of table positions of Lincoln City in the Football League Lincoln City FC League Performance.svg
Chart of table positions of Lincoln City in the Football League

Football in the city of Lincoln had been prominent since the 1860s although not strictly connected to the modern day club. After the disbanding of Lincoln Rovers (formerly Lincoln Recreation) in 1884, Lincoln City FC was formed as an amateur football association, and the first game Lincoln played was an emphatic 9–1 victory over local rivals Sleaford, on 4 October 1884. Originally they played at the John O'Gaunts ground, provided by wealthy local brewer Robert Dawber.

Lincoln turned professional in the 1891–92 season, and soon helped to form what was then the Second Division in 1892–93 season, as an increasing number of clubs wished to join the Football League. Their first game in the Football League was a 4–2 away defeat to Sheffield United on 3 September 1892. [3] Their first home game was also against Sheffield United, this time, however, Lincoln won 1–0. Due to Dawber's death in 1895, Lincoln moved from the John O'Gaunts Ground to Sincil Bank.

Lincoln fans do a card display before a match against Swindon Lincoln City - tifo.jpg
Lincoln fans do a card display before a match against Swindon

They failed re-election to the Football League in 1908. They won immediate re-election after winning the next year's Midland League, and would repeat this feat after failing re-election again in 1911 and 1920. Founder members of the Football League Third Division North in 1921, they won promotion as champions in 1931–32, but were relegated two seasons later. Crowned Third Division North champions again in 1947–48, they were relegated the next year, but would remain in the second tier for nine seasons after again winning the Third Division North title in 1951–52. Two successive relegations left them in the Fourth Division by 1962, where they would remain until Graham Taylor's title winning campaign of 1975–76. The next would oscillate between the Third and Fourth division for the next 10 years, missing out on promotion to the Second Division in 1982 and 1983.

Lincoln were relegated to the Fourth Division at the end of the 1985–86 season, and the year after that they became the first team to suffer automatic relegation from the Football League. They regained their Football League place automatically via promotion as champions of the Conference at the first attempt. In the 1997–98 season, Lincoln were promoted from the Third Division (previously the Fourth Division), but were immediately relegated back on the next season. On 3 May 2002 Lincoln entered into administration. [4] Lincoln City were relegated again from League Two (previously the Third Division) on the last day of the end of the 2010–11 season. In the 2016–17 season of the National League (English football) (previously the Conference), Lincoln City under Danny Cowley were promoted as champions back to the Football League.

In the 2016–17 FA Cup, Lincoln beat Championship side Ipswich Town, in a replay, after progressing past Guiseley, Altrincham and Oldham Athletic, before defeating Championship leaders Brighton and Hove Albion at Sincil Bank to make the fifth round of the FA cup for the first time since the end of the Victorian era. On 18 February, Lincoln went on to beat top flight side Burnley 1–0 to historically go through to the FA Cup quarter final, the first time a non-league club had progressed to the last eight since 1914. [5] [6] In the quarter finals, they were defeated 5–0 at Arsenal. [7]

In the 2017–18 season, on 6 February 2018, Lincoln beat Chelsea U21s in the semi-final of the 2017–18 EFL Trophy, taking them to Wembley Stadium for the first time in the 134 years of the club. They went on to win the final against Shrewsbury Town on 8 April 2018. The winning goal was scored by Elliot Whitehouse in the 16th minute and was the only goal of the match. [8] On 12 May Lincoln drew 0–0 with Exeter City F.C in the first leg of the League Two Playoff. [9] In the second leg, on 17 May, Lincoln lost 3–1. [10]

In the 2018–19 season, on 5 April 2019, Lincoln announced that Nettleham Ladies FC would be rebranded as Lincoln City Women from 1 June. [11] Lincoln won League Two, on 22 April 2019, after a 0–0 draw against Tranmere Rovers, having been top of the table since 25 August 2018. [12] Promotion from League Two represented Lincoln's first season in the EFL League One since the 1998-99 campaign.

Lincoln began their first season in the third tier in over twenty years with relative success, victorious in their first three games against Accrington Stanley, Rotherham and Southend. [13] [14] [15] On 9 September 2019 the team's then manager, Danny Cowley, announced his departure to join Championship side Huddersfield Town, having guided Lincoln to two promotions in his previous three seasons alongside brother and assistant manager Nicky. [16]

On 20 September 2019, Lincoln appointed Michael Appleton as their first team coach. [17]

Stadium

The Lincolnshire Echo Stand at Lincoln's Ground, Sincil Bank Lincsechostand.JPG
The Lincolnshire Echo Stand at Lincoln's Ground, Sincil Bank

The club have played at Sincil Bank since 1895. Previously, Lincoln City had played at the nearby John O'Gaunts ground since the club's 1884 inception. Sincil Bank has an overall capacity of 10,120 [1] and is colloquially known to fans as "The Bank". It is overlooked by Lincoln Cathedral. [18] Former Lincoln City chairman John Reames re-purchased the ground from the local council in 2000 at a cost of £175,000. The club had sold it in 1982 for £225,000 to fend off the threat of eviction, arranging a 125-year lease.

Sincil Bank hosted England's 2–0 win over Scotland in the Victory Shield on 28 November 2008. [19] Martin Peters paraded the FIFA World Cup Trophy at the ground in March 2010 as part of its global tour. [20] FA WSL club Lincoln Ladies played home games at Sincil Bank in their 2011 season. [21] The Ladies' club had previously hosted Arsenal Ladies there in an FA Women's Cup semi-final in March 2008. [22]

Rivals

The Lincolnshire derby, between Lincoln City and local rivals Boston United, being played at Sincil Bank Lincoln v Boston 002.jpg
The Lincolnshire derby, between Lincoln City and local rivals Boston United, being played at Sincil Bank

Lincoln City is one of three professional football clubs in Lincolnshire. Lincoln City's main rivals are Grimsby Town and Scunthorpe United, which at various points fans have considered one bigger than the other. Other prominent Lincolnshire rivals of the past include Gainsborough Trinity and Boston United, however meetings are nowadays limited between the clubs.

Nottinghamshire clubs Mansfield Town and Notts County are also considered rivals, and Peterborough United, Hull City and York City are clubs that have had some sort of rivalry with The Imps in the past. Lincoln United, the other football club based in Lincoln, are further down the footballing pyramid and are not a considered rival.

Badge and colours

Badge

Lincoln City's logo used until 2001 Lincoln City F.C. logo.png
Lincoln City's logo used until 2001

Lincoln City currently sport a "traditional" Lincoln Imp badge, synonymous with the success of the 70s and 80s. The badge was returned in 2014, with general manager John Vickers billing it the start of a "new era". [23] Between the two spells the club used two badges, the first of which being the city's heraldic shield with the letters "L.C.F.C" inscribed onto it. This badge was used until 2001, when the club used a similar design; however, it featured a yellow imp in the centre, with the nickname of "The Imps" written across.

Colours

Traditionally, the colours and design of the Lincoln City strip are a red and white striped shirt along with black shorts and red socks. This varied in the late 1960s and early 70s, the club opted to field a predominantly red strip with white shorts, and also in the 2000–01 season when the shirt was quartered red and white with white shorts. Currently, the home kit is largely red with white pinstriping down the length of the shirt, as well as black and white accents around the collar and cuff of the shirt. The shorts of the kit are also largely black, sporting red accents, and the socks red with black and white accents. Their away kit has never retained any single pattern or design, and areas varied vastly throughout the seasons, but is currently black across the shirt, shorts and socks with red accents on the edges of each piece. In recent years, the club have also released a third kit. Currently, the kit is green in colour, with a chevron pattern across it. This kit features white accents on the shirt, and white shorts with green accents.

Since 2015, the club's kits have been manufactured by Errea. Previous manufacturers have included Umbro (1973–78, 2007–11), Adidas (1978–83), Lowfields (1983–85), Osca (1985–87), Spall (1987–90), Matchwinner (1990–94), Admiral (1994–97), Super League (1997–99), Avec Sportswear (1999–2001), Imps Sport (2001–04), Lincoln City Collection (2004–06), Uhlsport (2006–07), and Nike (2011–15). Their current shirt sponsors are Peregrine Holdings.

Previous sponsors have included J.Arthur Bowers (1982), F&T Tyres (1983–89), Wheel Horse (1989–90), Pickfords (1990–91), Findalls (1991–92), Lincolnshire Echo (1992–98), Alstom (1998–2003), Siemens (2003–04), The Community Solutions Group (2004–06), Starglaze (2006–10), GoCar (2010–11), TSM (2011–13), Bishop Grosseteste University (2013–18), NSUK Asbestos Surveys (2018–19), SRP Hire (2019–20).

Current squad

First team

As of 4 June 2021 [24]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
2 DF Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  WAL Regan Poole
3 DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Max Melbourne
4 DF Flag of the Netherlands.svg  NED Lewis Montsma
5 DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Adam Jackson
6 MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Max Sanders
7 MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Tayo Edun
8 MF Flag of Scotland.svg  SCO James Jones
9 FW Flag of England.svg  ENG Tom Hopper
10 MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Jorge Grant (vice captain)
11 FW Flag of Ireland.svg  IRL Anthony Scully
14 FW Flag of Scotland.svg  SCO Theo Archibald
No.Pos.NationPlayer
15 DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Cohen Bramall
16 DF Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  WAL Joe Walsh
17 FW Flag of England.svg  ENG Ramirez Howarth
18 MF Flag of Scotland.svg  SCO Conor McGrandles
23 MF Flag of Scotland.svg  SCO Liam Bridcutt (captain)
25 MF Flag of Ireland.svg  IRL Zachary Elbouzedi
30 DF Flag of Ireland.svg  IRL Sean Roughan
31 GK Flag of England.svg  ENG Sam Long
33 DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Hayden Cann
FW Flag of England.svg  ENG Jovon Makama

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer

Under 18s squad

As of 17 September 2020 [25]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.Pos.NationPlayer
GK Flag of England.svg  ENG Matt Boylan
DF Flag of Ireland.svg  IRL Bobby Deane
DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Jasper Tetlow
DF Flag of Poland.svg  POL Kacper Gruszczynski
DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Josh Simpson
DF Flag of England.svg  ENG Ziyad Al-Oyouni
32 MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Ben Sault
MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Billy Brooks
No.Pos.NationPlayer
MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Ethan Hilton
MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Haydn Tear
MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Mehki Angol
MF Flag of Indonesia.svg  IDN Jack Brown
MF Flag of England.svg  ENG Cameo Scott
FW Flag of England.svg  ENG Nathan Odekonyero
34 FW Flag of England.svg  ENG Freddie Draper

Club management

Board members

RoleName
ChairmanClive Nates
Vice ChairmanJay Wright
DirectorRoger Bates
Director (RICT)Rob Bradley
DirectorRichard Clarke
DirectorHerman Kok
DirectorGreg Levine
DirectorDavid Lowes
Director/Sportvest PartnerSean Melnick
DirectorIan Reeve
Chief Executive OfficerLiam Scully
Director - Gold Trust MembersAmanda Slater
DirectorStephen Tointon

Backroom staff

RoleNationalityName
Manager Flag of England.svg Michael Appleton
Assistant Manager Flag of England.svg David Kerslake
First Team Development Coach Flag of England.svg Richard O'Donnell
First Team Goalkeeper Coach Flag of England.svg Steve Croudson
Head of Sports Science and Medicine Flag of England.svg Mike Hine
Lead Sports Scientist Flag of England.svg Luke Jelly
Sports Science & Medicine Assistant Flag of England.svg Luke Treadwell
Strength & Conditioning/Sports Massage Flag of England.svg Kieran Walker
Club Doctor Flag of England.svg Dr. Chris Batty
Assistant Sports Scientist Flag of England.svg Harry Rossington
Club Podiatrist Flag of England.svg Julian Soons
Director of Football Flag of England.svg Jez George

Managerial history

NameNatFromToRecord
PWDLWin %
John Strawson Flag of England.svg Sep 1892Feb 18969731115531.96%
Alf Martin Flag of England.svg 1896Mar 1897359112425.71%
James West Flag of England.svg 1897190010634225032.08%
David Calderhead Flag of Scotland.svg 1 August 19001 August 1907256895311434.77%
John Henry Strawson Flag of England.svg 1 August 190731 May 1914195524010326.67%
George Fraser Flag of Scotland.svg 1 August 191931 May 19214610102621.74%
David Calderhead Jr. Flag of Scotland.svg 1 April 192131 May 192411837285331.36%
Horace Henshall Flag of England.svg 1 August 19241 May 192713251285338.64%
Harry Parkes Flag of England.svg 1 May 19271 May 19363951877813047.34%
Joe McClelland Flag of England.svg 1 May 19361 January 194614061275243.57%
Bill Anderson Flag of England.svg 1 January 19461 January 196585530718935935.91%
Con Moulson Flag of Ireland.svg 1 January 19651 March 1965800800.00%
Roy Chapman Flag of England.svg 1 March 196531 May 19666515133723.08%
Ron Gray Flag of England.svg 1 August 19661 July 197018460556932.61%
Bert Loxley Flag of England.svg 1 July 19701 March 1971321241637.50%
David Herd Flag of Scotland.svg 1 March 19716 December 19728230302236.59%
Graham Taylor Flag of England.svg 6 December 197220 June 197721197615345.97%
George Kerr Flag of Scotland.svg 20 June 19771 December 19771854927.78%
Willie Bell Flag of Scotland.svg 21 December 197723 October 19784011131627.50%
Colin Murphy Flag of England.svg 6 November 19781 May 19853091218810039.16%
John Pickering Flag of England.svg 1 July 198520 December 198524461416.67%
George Kerr Flag of Scotland.svg 20 December 19857 March 19876117172727.87%
Peter Daniel Flag of England.svg 7 March 19871 May 19871225516.67%
Colin Murphy Flag of England.svg 26 May 198720 May 199010339263837.86%
Allan Clarke Flag of England.svg 3 June 199030 November 19901836916.67%
Steve Thompson Flag of England.svg 1 November 199031 May 199312848364437.50%
Keith Alexander Flag of Saint Lucia.svg 1 August 199316 May 19944813132227.08%
Sam Ellis Flag of England.svg 1 August 19944 September 19955621122337.50%
Steve Wicks Flag of England.svg 4 September 199516 October 1995702500.00%
John Beck Flag of England.svg 16 October 19956 March 199813048424036.92%
Shane Westley Flag of England.svg 7 March 199811 November 199830951630.00%
John Reames Flag of England.svg 11 November 19981 June 20008730213634.48%
Phil Stant Flag of England.svg 1 June 200027 February 20013812101631.58%
Alan Buckley Flag of England.svg 28 February 200125 April 20026916242923.19%
Keith Alexander Flag of Saint Lucia.svg 5 May 200224 May 200621381696338.03%
John Schofield Flag of England.svg 15 June 200615 October 20075121121841.18%
Peter Jackson Flag of England.svg 30 October 20072 September 20099232213934.78%
Chris Sutton Flag of England.svg 28 September 200928 September 20105114142328.00%
Steve Tilson Flag of England.svg 15 October 201010 October 2011371171929.73%
David Holdsworth Flag of England.svg 31 October 201117 February 20137121193129.57%
Gary Simpson Flag of England.svg 27 February 20133 November 20145823152039.65%
Chris Moyses Flag of England.svg 3 November 201412 May 20166422152734.38%
Danny Cowley Flag of England.svg 12 May 20169 September 201917695423953.98%
Michael Appleton Flag of England.svg 23 September 2019Present8737212942.5%

Honours

League

Football League Third Division North / League One (3rd tier)

Football League Fourth Division / League Two (4th tier)

Conference / National League (5th tier)

Cup

Football League Trophy

Football League Group Trophy

Conference Championship Shield

Other/Youth and Reserve

Lincolnshire Senior Cup

Pontin's Reserve League Cup

Fred Green Memorial Trophy3

John Reames Memorial Trophy

Midland League / Central League

Highest finishes

Highest league finish

FA Cup

EFL Cup

FA Trophy

Club records

Source [27]

Notes

  1. 1 2 "10 Things You Never Knew About The Imps". Wrexham Football Club. 22 January 2016. Archived from the original on 15 March 2010. Retrieved 5 May 2017.
  2. "Lincoln City appoint new chairman". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  3. Steve Pearce (1997). "Shoot, The ultimate stats and facts guide to English League Football, p.130". Boxtree.
  4. "City go into administration". Official Website. Lincoln City FC. 3 May 2002. Archived from the original on 7 March 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2010.
  5. "Burnley 0-1 Lincoln City". BBC Sport. 18 February 2017.
  6. "Lincoln City topple Burnley as Sean Raggett seals historic FA Cup shock". Guardian. 18 January 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  7. "Arsenal 5-0 Lincoln City". BBC Sport. 11 March 2017.
  8. "Lincoln City lift Checkatrade Trophy after narrow win over Shrewsbury". Guardian. 8 April 2018. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  9. "Lincoln City 0-0 Exeter City". BBC Sport. 12 May 2018.
  10. "Exeter City 3-1 Lincoln City (Agg 3-1)". BBC Sport. 17 May 2018.
  11. "Lincoln City Welcome Women's Football Team". www.redimps.co.uk. Retrieved 24 April 2019.
  12. "Lincoln City 0-0 Tranmere Rovers". BBC Sport. 22 April 2019.
  13. "Lincoln City 2-0 Accrington Stanley". BBC Sport. 3 August 2019.
  14. "Rotherham United 0-2 Lincoln City". BBC Sport. 10 August 2019.
  15. "Lincoln City 4-0 Southend United". BBC Sport. 17 August 2019.
  16. https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/49634696M
  17. https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/49775124
  18. David Conn (30 November 2009). "Lincoln look to supporters for survival". The Independent. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
  19. "Lions win Victory Shield". The Football Association. 28 November 2008. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  20. "Football World Cup trophy to be shown at Lincoln City". BBC. 28 February 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  21. Tony Leighton (30 November 2009). "OOH Lincoln declare intention to join women's Super League in 2011". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  22. "Lincoln City Ladies v Arsenal Ladies". BBC Lincolnshire. Retrieved 9 March 2010.
  23. "Lincoln City marks anniversary with red Imp return". BBC News. 2 April 2014. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  24. "First Team". Lincoln City F.C. Retrieved 16 August 2019.
  25. https://www.weareimps.com/academy/u18-squad/ . Retrieved 21 April 2020.Missing or empty |title= (help)
  26. "Lincoln City sign Akinde from Barnet". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  27. The Lincoln City FC Archive Archived 8 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine Lincooln City FC, 26 March 2009

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History of Lincoln City F.C.

Founded in 1884, Lincoln City F.C. won the Midland League in 1889–90, their first full season playing league football. They moved on from the Football Alliance to become founder members of the Football League Second Division in 1892, remaining there until they failed re-election in 1908. They won immediate re-election after winning the next year's Midland League, and would repeat this feat after failing re-election again in 1911 and 1920. Founder members of the Football League Third Division North in 1921, they won promotion as champions in 1931–32, but were relegated two seasons later. Crowned Third Division North champions again in 1947–48, they were relegated the next year, but would remain in the second tier for nine seasons after again winning the Third Division North title in 1951–52. Two successive relegations left them in the Fourth Division by 1962, where they would remain until Graham Taylor's title winning campaign of 1975–76.