Finland national football team

Last updated
Finland
Huuhkajat logo.svg
Nickname(s) Huuhkajat
(The Eagle-owls) [1]
Association Football Association of Finland
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Markku Kanerva
Captain Tim Sparv
Most caps Jari Litmanen (137)
Top scorer Jari Litmanen (32)
Home stadium Various
FIFA code FIN
Kit left arm fin20h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body fin20h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm fin20h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm fin20a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body fin20a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm fin20a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts fin20a.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks fin20a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 58 Steady2.svg(11 June 2020) [2]
Highest33 (March 2007)
Lowest110 (July–August 2017)
First international
Flag of The Russian Empire 1883.svgFinland 2–5 Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg
(Helsinki, Grand Duchy of Finland, Russian Empire; 22 October 1911)
as Finland
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 1–0 Finland  Flag of Finland.svg
(Stockholm, Sweden; 29 May 1919)
Biggest win
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 10–2 Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg
(Helsinki, Finland; 11 August 1922)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 8–0 San Marino  Flag of San Marino (1862-2011).svg
(Helsinki, Finland; 17 November 2010)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg  Germany 13–0 Finland  Flag of Finland.svg
(Leipzig, Germany; 1 September 1940)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2020 (played in 2021) )
National team against Denmark in 1933. FIN-NationalFootballTeam1933.png
National team against Denmark in 1933.

The Finland national football team (Finnish : Suomen jalkapallomaajoukkue, Swedish : Finlands fotbollslandslag) represents Finland in men's international football competitions and it is controlled by the Football Association of Finland, The team has never qualified for the FIFA World Cup finals in history, The team has a member of FIFA since 1904 and UEFA member since 1957.

Contents

Finland had not qualified a major tournament until securing a spot in the 2020 European Championship (postponed by a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic) and are the only Nordic team alongside minnows Faroe Islands to have never reached the FIFA World Cup finals. After many decades of relative obscurity, the nation made progression in the 2000s, achieving notable results against established European teams and reaching a peak of 33rd in the FIFA World Rankings in 2007. After a few years of poor results, they dipped to an all-time low of 110th in the FIFA rankings in 2017, but then began to rise up again and, as of June 2020, they sit at 58th.

History

Early history

The Football Association of Finland was founded in 1907 and became a member of FIFA in 1908. At the time, Finland was an autonomous grand duchy of the Russian Empire. Finland played its first international on 22 October 1911, as Sweden beat the Finns at the Eläintarha Stadium in Helsinki. Finland participated the 1912 Summer Olympics in Stockholm, beating Italy and the Russian Empire, but losing the bronze medal match against the Netherlands.

Period of dispersion

After the 1918 Civil War, the Finnish sports movement was divided into the right-wing Finnish Gymnastics and Sports Federation (SVUL) and the leftist Finnish Workers' Sports Federation (TUL), Finnish Football Association was a member of the SVUL. [3] Both sides had their own championship series, and between 1919–1939 the Finland national team was selected of the Football Association players only. The Finnish Workers' Sports Federation football team in turn, participated the competitions of the international labour movement. [4]

However, since the late 1920s several top footballers defected from TUL and joined the Football Association to be eligible for the national team. During the 1930s, these ″defectors″ formed the spine of the national team. For example, the Finland squad at the 1936 Summer Olympics was composed of eight former TUL players. [4] In 1937, Finland participated the FIFA World Cup qualification for the first time, losing all three matches against Sweden, Germany and Estonia.

Since 1939, TUL players were selected to the national team and finally in 1956, the TUL and Football Association series were merged. [4]

Post-war years

The 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki saw the Finnish hosts lose to Austria in the first round. Finland did, however, win the unofficial Nordic championship in 1964 and 1966. [5]

Finland also took part in European Championship qualifying since the 1968 event, but had to wait for its first win until 1978.

Later 20th century

The results of the team improved somewhat in the late 1970s and the 1980s. Finland missed out on qualification for Euro 1980 by just a point and for the 1986 World Cup by two points. Finland was invited to take part in the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow after many Western countries announced they would boycott the games, but failed to progress from its group.

By the mid-1990s Finland started to have more players in high-profile European leagues, led by the Ajax superstar Jari Litmanen. In 1996 Danish Euro 1992 winning coach Richard Møller Nielsen was hired to take Finland to the 1998 World Cup. The team enjoyed mixed fortunes in the campaign, high points of which were a draw and a win away to Norway and Switzerland respectively. Going into the last match, Finland would have needed a win at home to Hungary to earn a place in the play-offs. They led the game 1–0 going into injury time, but scored an own goal, and once again the dreams of qualification were over. Møller Nielsen also tried to lead Finland to Euro 2000. In this campaign the Finns recorded a sensational win away to Turkey, but couldn't compete with Germany and Turkey in the long run.

Antti Muurinen succeeded Møller Nielsen as coach in 2000. He had arguably the most talented group of Finnish players ever at his disposal, including players such as Antti Niemi, Sami Hyypiä, Teemu Tainio and Mikael Forssell in addition to the legendary Litmanen. The team also performed quite well under him in qualification for the 2002 World Cup despite a difficult draw, earning two draws against Germany and a home draw with England as well as beating Greece 5–1 in Helsinki. In the end, however, England and Germany proved too strong, and the Finns finished third in the group, but were the only team in that group not to lose at home. Hopes were high going into qualification for Euro 2004 after the promising last campaign and friendly wins over the likes of Norway, Belgium and Portugal (which seen the Finns jump from 40th–30th in the Elo ranking [6] ). However, Finland started the campaign by losing to Wales and Yugoslavia (later Serbia and Montenegro, now two separate nations). These losses were followed by two defeats by Italy, and a 3–0 home win over Serbia and Montenegro was little consolation, as the Finns finished fourth in the group. In qualification for the 2006 World Cup Finland failed to score a single point in six matches against the top three teams in their group, the Netherlands, the Czech Republic and Romania. Muurinen was sacked in June 2005, and he was replaced by caretaker Jyrki Heliskoski, but results didn't improve.

In August 2005, it was announced that Roy Hodgson would become the new Finland coach in 2006, and he started in the job in January of that year. Hodgson stepped down as manager after they failed to qualify for Euro 2008. [7] His replacement was a Scotsman, Stuart Baxter, who signed a contract until the end of the 2012 European Championship qualification campaign. [8]

Recent history

In the Euro 2008 qualifying Finland needed to win their last qualifying game away at Portugal to qualify for their first major football tournament. However, the match ended 0–0 meaning the team missed out on qualification to the tournament, with Finland ending the group stage with 24 points and Portugal with 27 points. However, the performance in qualifying led to the Finns gaining their best-ever FIFA world ranking to date at the position of 33rd.

The 2010 World Cup qualifying campaign under new head coach Stuart Baxter saw Finland again finish third in their group with five wins, three draws and two defeats. They were the only team in qualifying not to lose to eventual 3rd-place finishers Germany; in both the home and away matches Finland had led Germany only to concede late equalisers. Finland finished a disappointing fourth in Euro 2012 qualifying, with only three wins, two of them against minnows San Marino.

In the 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign, Finland's best result was a 1–1 draw at reigning world champions Spain. They finished third in the five-team Group I, behind Spain and France. Finland finished fourth in Euro 2016 qualifying but achieved another noteworthy result. Joel Pohjanpalo's goal gave the Finns a 1–0 win at former European champions Greece, who had reached the second round of the 2014 World Cup and were the top seeds of their qualifying group.

The 2018 World Cup qualifying campaign saw Finland finish a disappointing fifth in their group with only two wins, although one of them was over Iceland, who finished top of the qualifying group.

On 15 November 2019, Finland managed to qualify to the first major tournament, UEFA Euro 2020, in their history after defeating Liechtenstein 3–0. [9] The successful qualifying campaign in Group J, was aided by a distinctive performance of Teemu Pukki, who scored ten goals in the qualifications. [10]

Home stadiums

Most of Finland's important home matches are played at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in the capital Helsinki. It has been Finland's principal home stadium ever since its construction was completed in 1938. Before that Pallokenttä in Helsinki was mainly used.

Today, some qualifying matches against lower profile opponents and some friendlies are hosted at the Tampere Stadium in Tampere and Veritas Stadion in Turku. Helsinki's Telia 5G -areena, which has artificial turf, is also used for some friendlies and qualifiers. During reconstruction of Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 2016–19 Tampere Stadium serves as the main stadium for qualifying games.

The Finnish National Team Supporters at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 2009. Pohjoiskaarre-SMJK.jpg
The Finnish National Team Supporters at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in 2009.

Competitive record

World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1938 Did not qualify300307
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950 Withdrew during qualifying201114
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954 Did not qualify4022713
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 4004219
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 4004312
Flag of England.svg 1966 6105520
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 6105628
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 6114321
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 62041116
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 8107427
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 8323712
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 6114416
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 10217918
Flag of France.svg 1998 83231112
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 8332127
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 125162119
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 105321414
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 823359
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 10235913
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026
Total0/23129322374134287

European Championship record

UEFA European Championship record UEFA European Championship qualifying record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of France.svg 1960 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 Did not qualify6024512
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972 6015116
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 6015313
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 62221015
Flag of France.svg 1984 6015314
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 6114410
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 814358
Flag of England.svg 1996 105051818
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 83141313
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 8314910
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg 2008 14662137
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 103161616
Flag of France.svg 2016 10334910
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 Qualified106041610
Flag of Germany.svg 2024 To be determinedTo be determined
Total1/17114332457125172

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
YearDivisionRoundPosPldWD*LGFGA
2018–19 C Group stage
Promoted
1st640253
2020–21 B To be determined
TotalGroup stage
League C
1/1640253

Summer Olympics

Olympics record
YearRoundPositionGPWD*LGSGA
Flag of Greece (1822-1978).svg 1896 was not involved
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1900
Flag of the United States (1896-1908).svg 1904
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 1908
Flag of Sweden.svg 1912 Fourth Place4th4202516
Since 1917, Declaration of Independence Flag of Finland 1918 (state).svg
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1920 Did not qualify
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1924
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 1928
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg 1932
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg 1936 Round of 1614th100137
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 1948 Did not qualify
Flag of Finland.svg 1952 Round of 169th100134
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1956 Did not qualify
Flag of Italy.svg 1960
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg 1964
Flag of Mexico.svg 1968
Flag of Germany.svg 1972
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1976
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg 1980 Group stage9th311132
Flag of the United States.svg 1984 Did not qualify
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg 1988
Flag of Spain.svg 1992
Flag of the United States.svg 1996
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000
Flag of Greece.svg 2004
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016
Flag of Japan.svg 2020
Flag of France.svg 2024 To be determined
Flag of the United States.svg 2028 To be determined
Total4/250 Titles93151429

Nordic Football Championship

Nordic Football Championship record
YearRoundPositionPldWD *LGFGA
1929–32 Fourth place4th122282352
1933–36 123181836
1937–47 1211101251
1948–51 121381128
1952–55 1211101353
1956–59 120111844
1960–63 122281437
1964–67 Third place3rd125251417
1968–71 Fourth place4th120481031
1972–77 121471026
1978–80 61471026
1981–85 6114711
2000–01 Champions1st540173
Total1 Title13/14137212492150401
  • Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won.

Baltic Cup

Baltic Cup (football) Record
YearResultGPWDLGSGA
2012 Runners-up211032
2014 Third place210121
Total2/27421153

All–time record against all nations

This list is Finland national team complete records, both friendlies and competitive matches. [11]

Recent fixtures and results

2019

5 September 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Finland  Flag of Finland.svg1–0Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Tampere, Finland
21:45 (UTC+2) Pukki Soccerball shade.svg 52' (pen.) Report Stadium: Tampere Stadium
Referee: Juan Martínez Munuera (Spain)
8 September 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Finland  Flag of Finland.svg1–2Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Tampere, Finland
20:45 CEST (UTC+2) Pukki Soccerball shade.svg 72' (pen.) Report Immobile Soccerball shade.svg 59'
Jorginho Soccerball shade.svg 79' (pen.)
Stadium: Tampere Stadium
Referee: Bobby Madden (Scotland)
12 October 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Bosnia and Herzegovina  Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg4–1Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina
18:00 (UTC+2) Hajrović Soccerball shade.svg 29'
Pjanić Soccerball shade.svg 37' (pen.), 58'
Hodžić Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Report Pohjanpalo Soccerball shade.svg 79'Stadium: Bilino Polje
Referee: Ivan Kružliak (Slovakia)
15 October 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Finland  Flag of Finland.svg3–0Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia Turku, Finland
19:00 (UTC+2) Jensen Soccerball shade.svg 31'
Pukki Soccerball shade.svg 61', 88'
Report Stadium: Veritas Stadion
Referee: Jesús Gil Manzano (Spain)
15 November 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Finland  Flag of Finland.svg3–0Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein Helsinki, Finland
19:00 (UTC+1) Tuominen Soccerball shade.svg 21'
Pukki Soccerball shade.svg 64' (pen.), 75'
Report Stadium: Telia 5G -areena
Referee: Benoît Bastien (France)
18 November 2019 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Greece  Flag of Greece.svg2–1Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Heraklion, Greece
21:45 (UTC+1) Mantalos Soccerball shade.svg 47'
Galanopoulos Soccerball shade.svg 70'
Report Pukki Soccerball shade.svg 27'Stadium: Pankritio Stadium
Referee: Aleksei Eskov (Russia)

2020

31 March 2020 Friendly France  Flag of France.svgCancelledFlag of Finland.svg  Finland Décines-Charpieu, France
Report Stadium: Stade de Lyon
3 September 2020 2020–21 UEFA Nations League Finland  Flag of Finland.svgvFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Finland
21:45 (UTC+3)
7 October 2020 Friendly Poland  Flag of Poland.svgvFlag of Finland.svg  Finland Wrocław, Poland
20:45 (UTC+2)Stadium: Stadion Miejski
10 October 2020 2020–21 UEFA Nations League Finland  Flag of Finland.svgvFlag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria Finland
19:00 (UTC+3)
16 November 2020 2020–21 UEFA Nations League Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svgvFlag of Finland.svg  Finland Cardiff, Wales
19:45 (UTC)Stadium: Cardiff City Stadium

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying matches against Liechtenstein and Greece on 15 November and 18 November 2019. [12] [13]
Caps and goals as of 18 November 2019 after the game against Greece.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Lukáš Hrádecký (Vice captain) (1989-11-24) 24 November 1989 (age 30)580 Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen
121 GK Jesse Joronen (1993-03-21) 21 March 1993 (age 27)80 Flag of Italy.svg Brescia
231 GK Anssi Jaakkola (1987-03-13) 13 March 1987 (age 33)30 Flag of England.svg Bristol Rovers

42 DF Joona Toivio (1988-04-04) 4 April 1988 (age 32)653 Flag of Sweden.svg Häcken
222 DF Jukka Raitala (1988-09-15) 15 September 1988 (age 31)510 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal Impact
22 DF Paulus Arajuuri (1988-06-15) 15 June 1988 (age 32)433 Flag of Cyprus.svg Pafos
182 DF Thomas Lam (1993-12-18) 18 December 1993 (age 26)220 Flag of the Netherlands.svg PEC Zwolle
2 DF Albin Granlund (1989-09-01) 1 September 1989 (age 30)180 Flag of Sweden.svg Örebro
162 DF Juha Pirinen (1991-10-22) 22 October 1991 (age 28)180 Flag of Norway.svg Tromsø
152 DF Sauli Väisänen (1994-06-05) 5 June 1994 (age 26)180 Flag of Italy.svg Chievo
32 DF Daniel O'Shaughnessy (1994-09-14) 14 September 1994 (age 25)30 Flag of Finland.svg HJK
52 DF Leo Väisänen (1997-07-23) 23 July 1997 (age 22)20 Flag of Sweden.svg Elfsborg

143 MF Tim Sparv (Captain) (1987-02-20) 20 February 1987 (age 33)741 Flag of Denmark.svg Midtjylland
113 MF Rasmus Schüller (1991-06-18) 18 June 1991 (age 29)400 Flag of Finland.svg HJK
83 MF Robin Lod (1993-04-17) 17 April 1993 (age 27)393 Flag of the United States.svg Minnesota United
133 MF Pyry Soiri (1994-09-22) 22 September 1994 (age 25)225 Flag of Denmark.svg Esbjerg
63 MF Glen Kamara (1995-10-28) 28 October 1995 (age 24)191 Flag of Scotland.svg Rangers
193 MF Joni Kauko (1990-07-12) 12 July 1990 (age 30)180 Flag of Denmark.svg Esbjerg
173 MF Simon Skrabb (1995-01-19) 19 January 1995 (age 25)140 Flag of Italy.svg Brescia
93 MF Fredrik Jensen (1997-09-09) 9 September 1997 (age 22)114 Flag of Germany.svg Augsburg
213 MF Robert Taylor (1994-10-21) 21 October 1994 (age 25)100 Flag of Norway.svg Brann

104 FW Teemu Pukki (1990-03-29) 29 March 1990 (age 30)8025 Flag of England.svg Norwich City
74 FW Jasse Tuominen (1995-11-12) 12 November 1995 (age 24)151 Flag of Sweden.svg Häcken
204 FW Rasmus Karjalainen (1996-04-04) 4 April 1996 (age 24)91 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Fortuna Sittard

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team in the last twelve months. Only players available for call-up, not retired players.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
DF Jere Uronen (1994-07-13) 13 July 1994 (age 26)401 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Genk v. Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia , 15 October 2019
DF Niko Markkula (1990-06-27) 27 June 1990 (age 30)00 Flag of Finland.svg SJK v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy , 8 September 2019

MF Petteri Forsell (1990-10-16) 16 October 1990 (age 29)101 Flag of Poland.svg Korona Kielce v. Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia , 15 October 2019

FW Joel Pohjanpalo (1994-09-13) 13 September 1994 (age 25)327 Flag of Germany.svg Hamburger SV v. Flag of Greece.svg  Greece , 18 November 2019 INJ
FW Lassi Lappalainen (1998-08-24) 24 August 1998 (age 21)70 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal Impact v. Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia , 15 October 2019

Coaching staff

[14] [15] [16]

PositionName
Head Coach Flag of Finland.svg Markku Kanerva
Assistant Coach Flag of Finland.svg Mika Nurmela
Assistant Coach Flag of Finland.svg Kari Martonen
Goalkeeping Coach Flag of Finland.svg Antti Niemi
Fitness Coach Flag of Finland.svg Jari-Pekka Keurulainen
Physiotherapists Flag of Finland.svg Jari-Pekka Keurulainen
Flag of Finland.svg Paavo Leiramo
Video Analyst Flag of Finland.svg Henri Lehto
Doctor Flag of Finland.svg Heikki Kinnunen
Osteopath Flag of Finland.svg Hannu Kanerva
Kit Manager Flag of Finland.svg Jari Parikka
Team Manager Flag of Finland.svg Lennart Wangel

Player records

As of 18 November 2019

Most capped players

RankNameCareerCapsGoals
1 Jari Litmanen 1989–201013732
2 Sami Hyypiä 1992–20101055
Jonatan Johansson 1996–201010522
4 Ari Hjelm 1983–199610020
5 Joonas Kolkka 1994–20109811
6 Mikael Forssell 1999–20148729
7 Erkka Petäjä 1983–1994840
8 Teemu Pukki 2009–8025
9 Arto Tolsa 1964–19817710
10 Hannu Tihinen 1997–2010765
Petri Pasanen 2000–2013761

Top goalscorers

RankNameCareerGoalsCapsAverage
1 Jari Litmanen 1989–2010321370.23
2 Mikael Forssell 1999–201429870.33
3 Teemu Pukki 2009–25800.31
4 Jonatan Johansson 1996–2010221050.21
5 Ari Hjelm 1983–1996201000.2
6 Mika-Matti Paatelainen 1986–200018700.23
7 Verner Eklöf 1919–192717320.53
8 Aulis Koponen 1924–193516390.41
Gunnar Åström 1923–193716440.36
10 Alexei Eremenko 2003–201314570.25

Managers

Last updated: 13 Oct 2015.

TenureNatCoachRecord
GWDLWin %
1911–21None17629035.29
1922 Flag of Finland.svg Jarl Öhman 4103025.00
1923–35None77221243028.57
1936–37 Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg Ferdinand Fabra 8116012.50
1937–38None9306033.33
1939 Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg Gábor Obitz 6105016.67
1939–43None7016000.00
1945 Flag of Sweden.svg Axel Mårtensson 2002000.00
1946 Flag of Finland.svg Niilo Tammisalo 3003000.00
1947–55 Flag of Finland.svg Aatos Lehtonen 517935013.73
1955–58 Flag of Germany.svg Kurt Weinreich 233119013.04
1959–61 Flag of Finland.svg Aatos Lehtonen 193016015.79
1962–74 Flag of Finland.svg Olavi Laaksonen 91162154017.58
1975 Flag of Finland.svg Martti Kosma 2011000.00
1975–78 Flag of Finland.svg Aulis Rytkönen 308418026.67
1979–81 Flag of Finland.svg Esko Malm 274617014.81
1982–87 Flag of Finland.svg Martti Kuusela 5391133016.98
1988–92 Flag of Finland.svg Jukka Vakkila 4872120014.58
1993–94 Flag of Finland.svg Tommy Lindholm 255713020.00
1994–96 Flag of Finland.svg Jukka Ikäläinen 217410033.33
1996–99 Flag of Denmark.svg Richard Møller Nielsen 3491213026.47
2000–05 Flag of Finland.svg Antti Muurinen 72341226047.22
2005 Flag of Finland.svg Jyrki Heliskoski (caretaker)6222033.33
2006–07 Flag of England.svg Roy Hodgson 226115027.27
2008–10 Flag of England.svg Stuart Baxter 318617025.81
2010-2011 Flag of Finland.svg Olli Huttunen (caretaker)1100100.00
2011 Flag of Finland.svg Markku Kanerva (caretaker)2011000.00
2011–2015 Flag of Finland.svg Mixu Paatelainen 43171115039.53
2015 Flag of Finland.svg Markku Kanerva (caretaker)5320060.00
2016 Flag of Sweden.svg Hans Backe 130310000.00
2016– Flag of Finland.svg Markku Kanerva 261358050.00
Total749182160407024.30

Honours

Minor tournaments

Kits and crest

Finland's kit are currently supplied by American brand Nike, Inc. They replaced German company Adidas who supplied Finland's kits between 1979 and 2014.

Kit sponsorship

Kit supplierPeriod
Flag of Germany.svg Adidas 1979–2014
Flag of the United States.svg Nike 2014–

See also

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The North Macedonia national football team (Macedonian: Фудбалска репрезентација нa Северна Македонија, romanized: Fudbalska reprezentacija na Severna Makedonija; represents North Macedonia in international football, and is controlled by the Football Federation of North Macedonia. The national team plays its home matches at the Toshe Proeski Arena in Skopje.

Slovakia national football team mens national football team representing Slovakia

The Slovakia national football team represents Slovakia in men's international football competition and it is governed by the Slovak Football Association (SFZ), the governing body for football in Slovakia. Slovakia's home stadium from 2019 is the reconstructed Tehelné pole in Bratislava. Their head coach is Pavel Hapal. Slovakia is one of the newest national football teams in the world, having split from the Czechoslovakia national team after the dissolution of the unified state in 1993. Slovakia maintains its own national side that competes in all major tournaments since.

Armenia national football team mens national association football team representing Armenia

The Armenia national football team represents Armenia in association football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Armenia, the governing body for football in Armenia. After gaining independence from the Soviet Union, the team played its first international match on October 12, 1992. The national team has participated in the qualification of every major tournament from the UEFA Euro 1996 onwards, though they are yet to qualify for the knockout stage in either a UEFA European Football Championship or a FIFA World Cup. In what was the Armenian national squad's greatest success at present, the team came in third place in the UEFA Euro 2012 qualifying stage, with controversial officiating preventing them from achieving second place, and hence moving on to the play-off stage.

Greece national football team Mens national association football team representing Greece

The Greece national football team represents Greece in men's international football and is controlled by the Hellenic Football Federation, the governing body for football in Greece. Greece play most of their home matches in or near Athens, either in Athens at the Olympic Stadium in the Maroussi section of the city or in the port city of Piraeus at the Karaiskakis Stadium just outside Athens. Greece is one of only ten national teams to have been crowned UEFA European Champions.

Czech Republic national football team mens national association football team representing the Czech Republic

The Czech national football team represents the Czech Republic in international football, and are controlled by the Football Association of the Czech Republic, the governing body for football in the Czech Republic. Historically, the team participated in FIFA and UEFA competitions as Bohemia and Czechoslovakia. The Czech team, as Czechoslovakia, finished as runners-up to hosts Italy at the second-ever FIFA World Cup in 1934 and again were runners-up to Pelé's Brazil at the 1962 World Cup in Chile. They won the European Championship in 1976 over West Germany.

Israel national football team mens national association football team representing Israel

The Israel national football team represents Israel in international football, and is governed by the Israel Football Association (IFA).

Estonia national football team mens national association football team representing Estonia

The Estonia national football team represents Estonia in international football matches and is controlled by the Estonian Football Association, the governing body for football in Estonia. Estonia's home ground is A. Le Coq Arena in Tallinn.

Malta national football team mens national association football team representing Malta

The Malta national football team represents Malta in international football and is controlled by the Malta Football Association, the governing body for football in Malta.

The Belarus national football team represents Belarus in international football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Belarus, the governing body for football in Belarus. Belarus' home ground is Borisov Arena in Borisov. Since independence in 1991, Belarus has not yet qualified for a FIFA World Cup or UEFA European Championship.

Montenegro national football team mens national association football team representing Montenegro

The Montenegro national football team has represented Montenegro in international football since 2007. It is controlled by the Football Association of Montenegro, the governing body for football in Montenegro. Montenegro's home ground is Podgorica City Stadium in Podgorica.

Gibraltar national football team mens national association football team representing Gibraltar

The Gibraltar national football team represents Gibraltar in international football competitions, and is controlled by the Gibraltar Football Association. Gibraltar applied for full UEFA membership and was accepted by the UEFA Congress in May 2013 and can therefore compete in the UEFA European Championship beginning with the 2016 tournament for which the team competed in UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying Group D. On 13 May 2016 Gibraltar became a member of FIFA at the governing body's 66th Congress which was held in Mexico City. Gibraltar is the smallest UEFA member in terms of both area and population.

Russia national football team mens national association football team representing Russia

The Russia national football team represents Russia in men's international football and it is controlled by the Russian Football Union, the governing body for football in Russia. Russia's home ground is the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow and their current head coach is Stanislav Cherchesov.

References

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