Finnish Cup

Last updated
Finnish Cup
Founded1955
RegionFinland
Number of teams125
Qualifier for UEFA Europa Conference League
Current champions Ilves
(3rd title)
Most successful club(s) HJK Helsinki
(13 titles)
Television broadcasters VeikkausTV
Soccerball current event.svg 2021 Finnish Cup

The Finnish Cup (Finnish : Suomen cup; Swedish : Finlands cup) is Finland's main national cup competition in football. This yearly competition is open for all member clubs of the FA of Finland and has been played since 1955.

Contents

Finnish Cup winner qualifies to UEFA Europa League.

Finals

Final attendances between 1955-2008 Finnish Cup Attendance.png
Final attendances between 1955-2008

The performance of various clubs is shown in the following table: [1] [2]

SeasonDateWinnerRunner-upScoreVenueCityAtt.
1955 20 November 1955 Haka HPS 5–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,021
1956 28 October 1956 Pallo-Pojat TKT 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 2,020
1957 27 October 1957 IF Drott KPT 2–1 (aet) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,907
1958 3 September 1958 KTP KIF 4–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,005
1959 1 November 1959 Haka HIFK 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 4,176
1960 23 October 1960 Haka RU-38 3–1 (aet) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 4,729
1961 22 October 1961 KTP Pallo-Pojat 5–2 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,601
1962 21 October 1962 HPS RoPS 5–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 5,022
1963 20 October 1963 Haka Reipas Lahti 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 14,052
1964 18 October 1964 Reipas Lahti LaPa 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 4,837
1965 20 October 1965 Åbo IFK TPS 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 1,936
1966 30 October 1966 HJK KTP 6–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 7,069
1967 11 October 1967 KTP Reipas Lahti 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 5,243
1968 12 October 1968 KuPS KTP 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,521
1969 8 October 1969 Haka Honka 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 1,250
1970 4 October 1970 MP Reipas Lahti 4–1 (aet) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 5,399
1971 10 October 1971 MP Sport 4–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 2,645
1972 15 October 1972 Reipas Lahti VPS 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 528
1973 7 October 1973 Reipas Lahti SePS 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 2,846
1974 6 October 1974 Reipas Lahti OTP 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 4,866
1975 25 April 1976 Reipas Lahti HJK 6–2 (aet) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 6,086
1976 17 April 1977 Reipas Lahti FC Ilves 2–0 Tammela Stadion Tampere 2,175
1977 23 October 1977 Haka SePS 3–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 2,134
1978 8 October 1978
15 October 1978
Reipas Lahti KPT 3–1
1–1
Väinölänniemi
Radiomäki
Kuopio
Lahti
1,664
1,731
1979 21 October 1979 FC Ilves TPS 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,409
1980 19 October 1980 KTP Haka 3–2 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 7,039
1981 17 October 1981 HJK FC Kuusysi 4–0 Töölön Pallokenttä Helsinki 5,063
1982 16 October 1982 Haka KPV 3–2 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 4,161
1983 15 October 1983 FC Kuusysi Haka 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 5,008
1984 20 October 1984 HJK FC Kuusysi 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 6,057
1985 19 October 1985 Haka HJK 2–2 (aet) 2–1 (p) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 6,622
1986 11 October 1986 RoPS KePS 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,636
1987 17 October 1987 FC Kuusysi OTP 5–4 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 7,176
1988 15 October 1988 Haka OTP 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,504
1989 14 October 1989 KuPS Haka 3–2 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 5,203
1990 13 October 1990 FC Ilves HJK 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 8,285
1991 24 October 1991 TPS FC Kuusysi 0–0 (aet) 5–3 (p) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 8,727
1992 9 July 1992 MyPa FF Jaro 2–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 9,517
1993 17 July 1993 HJK RoPS 2–0 Pori Stadium Pori 4,680
1994 10 July 1994 TPS HJK 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 7,617
1995 28 October 1995 MyPa FC Jazz 1–0 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 6,140
1996 3 November 1996 HJK TPS 0–0 (aet) 4–3 (p) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,632
1997 25 October 1997 FC Haka TPS 2–1 (aet) Olympic Stadium Helsinki 4,107
1998 31 October 1998 HJK PK-35 3–2 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 5,023
1999 30 October 1999 FC Jokerit FF Jaro 2–1 Olympic Stadium Helsinki 3,217
2000 10 November 2000 HJK Kotkan TP 1–0 Finnair Stadium Helsinki 3,471
2001 12 November 2001 Atlantis FC Tampere United 1–0 Tammela Stadion Tampere 3,820
2002 9 November 2002 FC Haka FC Lahti 4–1 Finnair Stadium Helsinki 2,984
2003 1 November 2003 HJK AC Allianssi 2–1 (aet) Finnair Stadium Helsinki 3,520
2004 30 October 2004 MyPa FC Hämeenlinna 2–1 Finnair Stadium Helsinki 2,650
2005 29 October 2005 FC Haka TPS 4–1 Finnair Stadium Helsinki 2,130
2006 4 November 2006 HJK KPV 1–0 Finnair Stadium Helsinki 2,447
2007 11 November 2007 Tampere United FC Honka 3–3 (aet) 3–1 (p) Finnair Stadium Helsinki 1,457
2008 1 November 2008 HJK FC Honka 2–1 (aet) Finnair Stadium Helsinki 1,554
2009 31 October 2009 Inter Turku Tampere United 2–1 Finnair Stadium Helsinki 2,065
2010 25 September 2010 TPS HJK 2–0 Sonera Stadium Helsinki 5,137
2011 24 September 2011 HJK KuPS 2–1 (aet) Sonera Stadium Helsinki 5,125
2012 29 September 2012 FC Honka KuPS 1–0 Sonera Stadium Helsinki 2,340
2013 28 September 2013 RoPS KuPS 2–1 Sonera Stadium Helsinki 4,032
2014 1 November 2014 HJK Inter Turku 0–0 (aet) 5–3 (p) Sonera Stadium Helsinki 2,349
2015 26 September 2015 IFK Mariehamn Inter Turku 2–1 Tehtaan kenttä Valkeakoski 3,017
2016 24 September 2016 SJK HJK 1–1 (aet) 7–6 (p) Ratina Stadium Tampere 2,000
20162017 23 September 2017 HJK SJK 1–0 OmaSP Stadion Seinäjoki 3,617
2017–2018 12 May 2018 Inter Turku HJK 1–0 Telia 5G Areena Helsinki 3,540
2019 15 June 2019 Ilves IFK Mariehamn 2-0 Wiklof Holding Arena Mariehamn 3,250
2020 3 October 2020 HJK Helsinki FC Inter Turku 2-0 Veritas Stadion Turku0

Performance by club

The performance of various clubs is shown in the following table: [1] [2]

ClubWinnersRunners-upWinning Years
HJK
14
7
1966, 1981, 1984, 1993, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2011, 2014, 2016–17, 2020
FC Haka
12
3
1955, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1969, 1977, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1997, 2002, 2005
Reipas Lahti
7
3
1964, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978
KTP
4
3
1958, 1961, 1967, 1980
TPS
3
5
1991, 1994, 2010
Ilves
3
1
1979, 1990, 2019
MyPa
3
1992, 1995, 2004
KuPS
2
3
1968, 1989
Kuusysi
2
3
1983, 1987
Inter Turku
2
3
2009, 2017–18
RoPS
2
2
1986, 2013
MP
2
1970, 1971
FC Honka
1
3
2012
TamU
1
2
2007
Pallo-Pojat
1
1
1956
HPS
1
1
1962
IFK Mariehamn
1
1
2015
Seinäjoen Jalkapallokerho
1
1
2016
IF Drott
1
1957
ÅIFK
1
1965
FC Jokerit
1
1999
Atlantis
1
2001

Performance by region

RegionClubsWinnersWinning Years
Uusimaa HJK, Pallo-Pojat, HPS, FC Jokerit, Atlantis FC, FC Honka
18
1956, 1962, 1966, 1981, 1984, 1993, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016–17
Pirkanmaa Haka, Ilves, Tampere United
15
1955, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1969, 1977, 1979, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1990, 1997, 2002, 2005, 2007
Päijät-Häme Reipas, Kuusysi
9
1964, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978, 1983, 1987
Kymenlaakso KTP, MyPa
7
1958, 1961, 1967, 1980, 1992, 1995, 2004
Varsinais-Suomi TPS, FC Inter, ÅIFK
6
1965, 1991, 1994, 2009, 2010, 2018
Pohjois-Savo KuPS
2
1968, 1989
Etelä-Savo MP
2
1970, 1971
Lappi RoPS
2
1986, 2013
Pohjanmaa IF Drott
1
1957
Etelä-Pohjanmaa SJK
1
2016
Åland Islands MIFK
1
2015

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Finland - List of Cup Finals". www.rsssf.com.
  2. 1 2 "Finnish Cup (men), finals 1955–2007". based on Jalkapallokirja 2007. Suomencup.net. 14 June 2008. Archived from the original on 4 January 2009. Retrieved 20 September 2008.