Croatian Football Cup

Last updated
Croatian Cup
Founded1992
Region Croatia
Number of teams48
Qualifier for UEFA Europa Conference League
Current champions Dinamo Zagreb
(16th title)
Most successful club(s) Dinamo Zagreb
(16 titles)
Television broadcastersHNTV
HRT (semi-final and final)
Website Official website
Soccerball current event.svg 2021–22 Croatian Cup

The Croatian Football Cup (Croatian : Hrvatski nogometni kup), also colloquially known as Rabuzinovo sunce (lit.' Rabuzin 's Sun'), is an annually held football tournament for Croatian football clubs and is the second most important competition in Croatian football after the Prva HNL championship. It is governed by the Croatian Football Federation (HNS) and usually runs from late August to late May. Cup winners automatically qualify for next season's UEFA Europa Conference League, except when cup winners are also Prva HNL champions, in which case their berth in the Europa Conference League goes to the best placed team in the Prva HNL who haven't qualified for the UEFA competitions through their league performance. [1]

Contents

The cup was established in 1992, [2] after Croatian clubs had abandoned the Yugoslav First League and Yugoslav Cup competitions following the breakup of Yugoslavia. As of the most recent 2020–21 season a total of 30 cup seasons were held. The competition has historically been dominated by the two Eternal Derby sides—the most successful club is Dinamo Zagreb (formerly known in the 1990s as HAŠK Građanski and Croatia Zagreb) who appeared in 23 finals and won 16 titles, followed by Hajduk Split who won 6 titles out of 11 finals they appeared in. [3]

Either Dinamo or Hajduk appeared in all but three cup finals (in 1999, 2006 and 2020) and only three other clubs have won the cup—Rijeka (six wins), Inter Zaprešić (one win) and Osijek (one win). [3] Although clubs can qualify for the cup via regional county cups, which are usually contested by second-, third- or fourth-level sides, Uljanik Pula in 2003 was the only team in the history of the competition to have reached the cup final from outside the top level.

Format

Entries

Although in theory any club can take part in the cup, 48 teams enter the competition proper, based on three criteria: [1]

  1. Top sixteen best-ranked teams according to club coefficient calculated by the Croatian Football Federation which take into account their cup records in the previous five seasons
  2. Twenty-one club winners of regional cups organised in each of 21 counties of Croatia
  3. Eleven regional cup finalists, from the top 11 counties with the greatest number of active football clubs registered

Competition system

The 32 clubs which qualify via regional cups always enter in the preliminary round, which consists of 16 single-legged fixtures. [1] In case of a draw at the end of normal time, thirty minutes of extra time is played, and if scores are still level, a penalty shootout is held to determine the winner of the tie. [1] Sixteen winners of the preliminary ties go on to the first round proper (round of 32), where they are joined by the sixteen best-ranked clubs according to cup coefficient (this usually means all First League clubs and a handful of best-ranked lower level teams). Round of 32 (R1) and round of 16 (R2) are also played as single-legged fixtures. Until the 2014–15 season, from the quarter-finals onward, the competition employed a two-legged tie format, with winners progressing through on aggregate score. Since 2015–16, quarter-finals are also played as single-legged fixtures and, since 2017–18, the same applies for semi-finals. In case the score is still level at the end of regular time, extra time is played. If the score remains level after extra time, a penalty shootout takes place to determine tie winners. [1] With the exception of 1997 and 1999 finals, all finals were also played as two-legged fixtures until the rules were most recently changed for the 2014–15 season and a single-match final was made permanent. [4]

Croatian club cup coefficient

Clubs are awarded points for participation in specific round of the Cup. There are two exceptions in awarding points, first is clubs from preliminary round doesn't receive any points and second is a final where winner receives double of runner up. Points are summed through the season and added to five year ranking. [5]

RoundAwarded clubsPoints [6]
Preliminary round160
First round161
Second round82
Quarter-finals44
Semi-finals28
Runner up116
Winner132

Points used in this ranking will be used for qualification for the 2022–23 season and seeding for the season 2021–22. [7]

RankClub 2016−17 2017−18 2018−19 2019–20 2020–21 Total
1 Rijeka 6315636315219
2 Dinamo Zagreb 316331763195
3 Lokomotiva 715731363
4 Osijek 1571515759
5 Hajduk Split 73173755
6 Istra 1961 37333147
7 Slaven Belupo 73715739
8 Inter Zaprešić 77157137
9 Gorica 371525
10 Šibenik 3337319
11 Split 15111119
12 Vinogradar 3173115
13 Rudeš 371314
14 Varaždin 1133311
15 Zadar 1333111
16 Cibalia 331119
17 Oriolik 1179
18 Zagreb 131139
19 Novigrad 33118
20 GOŠK Dubrovnik 11136
21 Zelina 1135
22 Kurilovec 1135
23 BSK Bijelo Brdo 134
24 Krk 134
25 Bjelovar 314
26 Sesvete 314
27 Opatija 33
28 Belišće 33
29 Jadran LP 33
30 Marsonia 33
31 Solin 33
32 Mladost Ždralovi 33
33 Rudar Labin 33
34 Sloga NG 112
35 Nehaj 112
36 Zagora Unešić 112
37 Slavonija Požega 112
38 Međimurje 112
39 Vukovar '91 112
40 Slavija Pleternica 112
41Đakovo Croatia112
42 Croatia Zmijavci 112
43Rudar Mursko Središće11
44 Graničar Županja 11
45Polet SMnM11
46 Crikvenica 11
47Gaj Mače11
48Ferdinandovac11
49 Dilj 11
50 Jadran Poreč 11
51 Hrvace 11
52Buje11
53Mladost Petrinja11
54 Karlovac 1919 11
55Vuteks Sloga11
56Bednja11
57 Primorac Biograd 11
58Sloga Mravince11
59 Križevci 11
60 Zagorec 11
61 Vrapče 11
62 Nedelišće 11
63 Bedem Ivankovo 11
64 Vrbovec 11
65Borac Imbriovec11
66Libertas Novska11
67Veli Vrh11
68Jalžabet11
69 Samobor 11
70 Neretvanac 11
Seeding for 2021−22 Cup [8]

List of winners

Key

(R)Replay
Two-legged tie
*Match went to extra time
Dagger-14-plain.pngMatch decided by a penalty shoot-out (from 2015 after extra time)
Double-dagger-14-plain.pngWinning team won The Double
ItalicsTeam from outside the top level of Croatian football

List of winners

SeasonWinnersScoreRunners–upVenue(s)
1992 Inker Zaprešić (1) 2–1 HAŠK Građanski Stadion ŠRC Zaprešić; Stadion Maksimir
1992–93 Hajduk Split (1) 5–3 Croatia Zagreb Stadion Poljud; Stadion Maksimir
1993–94 Croatia Zagreb (1) 2–1 Rijeka Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Kantrida
1994–95 Hajduk Split Double-dagger-14-plain.png(2) 4–2 Croatia Zagreb Stadion Poljud; Stadion Maksimir
1995–96 Croatia Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(2) 3–0 Varteks Stadion Varteks; Stadion Maksimir
1996–97 Croatia Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(3) 2–1 NK Zagreb Stadion Maksimir
1997–98 Croatia Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(4) 3–1 Varteks Stadion Varteks; Stadion Maksimir
1998–99 Osijek (1) 2–1 * Cibalia Stadion Maksimir
1999–2000 Hajduk Split (3) 2–1 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Poljud; Stadion Maksimir
2000–01 Dinamo Zagreb (5) 3–0 Hajduk Split Stadion Poljud; Stadion Maksimir
2001–02 Dinamo Zagreb (6) 2–1 Varteks Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Varteks
2002–03 Hajduk Split (4) 5–0 Uljanik Pula Stadion Aldo Drosina; Stadion Poljud
2003–04 Dinamo Zagreb (7) 1–1 (a) Varteks Stadion Varteks; Stadion Maksimir
2004–05 Rijeka (1) 3–1 Hajduk Split Stadion Kantrida; Stadion Poljud
2005–06 Rijeka (2) 5–5 (a) Varteks Stadion Kantrida; Stadion Varteks
2006–07 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(8) 2–1 Slaven Belupo Stadion Maksimir; Gradski stadion (Koprivnica)
2007–08 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(9) 3–0 Hajduk Split Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Poljud
2008–09 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(10) 3–3 (4–3 p) Dagger-14-plain.png Hajduk Split Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Poljud
2009–10 Hajduk Split (5) 4–1 Šibenik Stadion Poljud; Stadion Šubićevac
2010–11 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(11) 8–2 Varaždin Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Varteks
2011–12 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(12) 3–1 Osijek Stadion Gradski vrt; Stadion Maksimir
2012–13 Hajduk Split (6) 5–4 Lokomotiva Stadion Poljud; Stadion Maksimir
2013–14 Rijeka (3) 3–0 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Maksimir; Stadion Kantrida
2014−15 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(13) 0–0 (4–2 p) Dagger-14-plain.png RNK Split Stadion Maksimir
2015–16 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(14) 2–1 Slaven Belupo Stadion Gradski vrt
2016–17 Rijeka Double-dagger-14-plain.png(4) 3–1 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Varteks
2017–18 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(15) 1–0 Hajduk Split Stadion HNK Cibalia
2018–19 Rijeka (5) 3–1 Dinamo Zagreb Stadion Aldo Drosina
2019–20 Rijeka (6) 1–0 Lokomotiva Stadion Šubićevac
2020–21 Dinamo Zagreb Double-dagger-14-plain.png(16) 6–3 Istra 1961 Gradski stadion Velika Gorica

Results by team

ClubWinnersLast final wonRunners-upLast final lost
Dinamo Zagreb [A] 16202172019
Hajduk Split 6201352018
Rijeka 6202011994
Osijek 1199912012
Inter Zaprešić [B] 119920
Varaždin [C] 062011
Slaven Belupo [E] 022016
Lokomotiva 022020
Istra 1961 [D] 022021
NK Zagreb 011997
Cibalia 011999
Šibenik 012010
RNK Split 012015

Winning managers

FinalWinning managerWinning clubLosing managerLosing club
1992 Ilija Lončarević Inker Zaprešić Vlatko Marković HAŠK Građanski
1993 Ivan Katalinić Hajduk Split Miroslav Blažević Croatia Zagreb
1994 Miroslav Blažević Croatia Zagreb Srećko Juričić Rijeka
1995 Ivan Katalinić Hajduk Split Zlatko Kranjčar Croatia Zagreb
1996 Zlatko Kranjčar Croatia Zagreb Luka Bonačić Varteks
1997 Otto Barić Croatia Zagreb Krešimir Ganjto NK Zagreb
1998 Zlatko Kranjčar Croatia Zagreb Dražen Besek Varteks
1999 Stanko Poklepović Osijek Srećko Lušić Cibalia
2000 Petar Nadoveza Hajduk Split Marijan Vlak Dinamo Zagreb
2001 Ilija Lončarević Dinamo Zagreb Zoran Vulić Hajduk Split
2002 Marijan Vlak Dinamo Zagreb Branko Janžek Varteks
2003 Zoran Vulić Hajduk Split Elvis Scoria Uljanik Pula
2004 Nikola Jurčević Dinamo Zagreb Miroslav Blažević Varteks
2005 Elvis Scoria Rijeka Igor Štimac Hajduk Split
2006 Dragan Skočić Rijeka Zlatko Dalić Varteks
2007 Branko Ivanković Dinamo Zagreb Elvis Scoria Slaven Belupo
2008 Zvonimir Soldo Dinamo Zagreb Robert Jarni Hajduk Split
2009 Krunoslav Jurčić Dinamo Zagreb Ante Miše Hajduk Split
2010 Stanko Poklepović Hajduk Split Branko Karačić Šibenik
2011 Marijo Tot [F] Dinamo Zagreb Samir Toplak Varaždin
2012 Ante Čačić Dinamo Zagreb Stanko Mršić Osijek
2013 Igor Tudor Hajduk Split Tomislav Ivković Lokomotiva
2014 Matjaž Kek Rijeka Zoran Mamić Dinamo Zagreb
2015 Zoran Mamić Dinamo Zagreb Zoran Vulić RNK Split
2016 Zoran Mamić Dinamo Zagreb Željko Kopić Slaven Belupo
2017 Matjaž Kek Rijeka Ivaylo Petev Dinamo Zagreb
2018 Nenad Bjelica Dinamo Zagreb Željko Kopić Hajduk Split
2019 Igor Bišćan Rijeka Nenad Bjelica Dinamo Zagreb
2020 Simon Rožman Rijeka Goran Tomić Lokomotiva
2021 Damir Krznar Dinamo Zagreb Danijel Jumić Istra 1961

By individual

RankNameWinnersClub(s)Winning Years
1 Flag of Croatia.svg Ivan Katalinić
2
Hajduk Split 1993, 1995
Flag of Croatia.svg Zlatko Kranjčar
2
Croatia Zagreb 1996, 1998
Flag of Croatia.svg Ilija Lončarević
2
Inker Zaprešić, Dinamo Zagreb 1992, 2001
Flag of Croatia.svg Stanko Poklepović
2
Osijek, Hajduk Split 1999, 2010
Flag of Croatia.svg Zoran Mamić
2
Dinamo Zagreb 2015, 2016
Flag of Slovenia.svg Matjaž Kek
2
Rijeka 2014, 2017

Footnotes

A.  ^ Originally called Dinamo Zagreb, the club was renamed "HAŠK Građanski" in 1992, and then again "Croatia Zagreb" in the winter break of the 1992–93 season. The club reverted to its original name in February 2000.
B.  ^ Inter Zaprešić was known by its sponsored name "Inker Zaprešić" (sometimes spelled "INKER") from 1991 to 2003.
C.  ^ Varaždin were known as "Varteks" from 1958 to 2010.
D.  ^ Istra 1961 was formerly known as "Uljanik Pula" (before 2003), "Pula 1856" (2003–05), "Pula Staro Češko" (2005–06), and "NK Pula" (2006–07) before adopting their current name in 2007. They are not to be confused with their cross-city rivals NK Istra.
E.  ^ Slaven Belupo based in Koprivnica were formerly known as "Slaven" until 1992. From 1992 to 1994 they were called "Slaven Bilokalnik" before adopting their current name for sponsorship reasons. Since UEFA does not approve sponsored club names, the club is listed as "Slaven Koprivnica" in European competitions and on UEFA's website.
F.  ^ Vahid Halilhodžić was in charge of Dinamo Zagreb in the first leg of 2011 Croatian Football Cup Final.

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References

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  8. https://hns-cff.hr/files/documents/18967/Glasnik_27-2020.pdf