Poland national football team

Last updated

Poland
Herb Polski.svg
Nickname(s) Biało-czerwoni (The White and Reds)
Orły (The Eagles)
Association Polish Football Association (PZPN)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Jerzy Brzęczek
Captain Robert Lewandowski
Most caps Jakub Błaszczykowski (106)
Top scorer Robert Lewandowski (56)
Home stadium Stadion Narodowy
FIFA code POL
Kit left arm pole18a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body pole18a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm pole18a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts poland18h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks poland18h.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm pole18h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body pole18h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm pole18h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts pol18h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 20 Steady2.svg(4 April 2019) [1]
Highest5 (August 2017)
Lowest78 (November 2013)
Elo ranking
Current 25 Decrease2.svg 6 (27 March 2019) [2]
Highest2 (10 September 1975 [3] )
Lowest58 (October 1956)
First international
Flag of Hungary 1940.svg  Hungary 1–0 Poland  Flag of Poland (1919-1928).svg
(Budapest, Hungary; 18 December 1921)
Biggest win
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 10–0 San Marino  Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg
(Kielce, Poland; 1 April 2009)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 8–0 Poland  Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 26 June 1948)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1938 )
Best resultThird place, 1974 and 1982
European Championship
Appearances3 (first in 2008 )
Best resultQuarter finals, 2016
Medal record
Men's football
Olympic Games
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1972 Munich Team
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1976 Montreal Team
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1992 Barcelona Team

The Poland national football team (Polish : Reprezentacja Polski w piłce nożnej) represents Poland in association football and is controlled by the Polish Football Association, the governing body for football in Poland.

Polish language West Slavic language spoken in Poland

Polish is a West Slavic language of the Lechitic group. It is spoken primarily in Poland and serves as the native language of the Poles. In addition to being an official language of Poland, it is also used by Polish minorities in other countries. There are over 50 million Polish language speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union.

Poland Republic in Central Europe

Poland, officially the Republic of Poland, is a country located in Central Europe. It is divided into 16 administrative subdivisions, covering an area of 312,696 square kilometres (120,733 sq mi), and has a largely temperate seasonal climate. With a population of approximately 38.5 million people, Poland is the sixth most populous member state of the European Union. Poland's capital and largest metropolis is Warsaw. Other major cities include Kraków, Łódź, Wrocław, Poznań, Gdańsk, and Szczecin.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Contents

At the FIFA World Cup, the current best result for Poland are two bronze medals won in 1974 and 1982, with this era being regarded as the golden era of Polish international association football.

FIFA World Cup association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

At the Euros, Poland's best result is reaching the quarter-finals in 2016, in Poland's third consecutive appearance at the competition. Poland's debut at the Euros was in 2008. They were co-hosts of the 2012 edition, along with Ukraine.

UEFA Euro 2016 2016 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 2016 UEFA European Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2016 or simply Euro 2016, was the 15th UEFA European Championship, the quadrennial international men's football championship of Europe organised by UEFA. It was held in France from 10 June to 10 July 2016. Spain were the two-time defending champions, having won the 2008 and 2012 tournaments, but were eliminated in the round of 16 by Italy. Portugal won the tournament for the first time, following a 1–0 victory after extra time over the host team, France, in the final played at the Stade de France.

UEFA Euro 2008 2008 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 2008 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2008 or simply Euro 2008, was the 13th UEFA European Football Championship, a quadrennial football tournament contested by European nations. It took place in Austria and Switzerland from 7 to 29 June 2008.

UEFA Euro 2012 2012 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 2012 UEFA European Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2012 or simply Euro 2012, was the 14th European Championship for men's national football teams organised by UEFA. The final tournament, held between 8 June and 1 July 2012, was co-hosted for the first time by Poland and Ukraine, and was won by Spain, who beat Italy 4–0 in the final at the Olympic Stadium, Kiev, Ukraine.

Overall, Poland's best ever result in international football tournaments as a whole was the gold medal won at the 1972 Munich Olympics, along with winning the silver medal on two occasions; at the 1976 Montreal Olympics and at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics.

1972 Summer Olympics Games of the XX Olympiad, held in Munich in 1972

The 1972 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XX Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event held in Munich, West Germany, from August 26 to September 11, 1972.

1976 Summer Olympics Games of the XXI Olympiad, held in Montréal in 1976

The 1976 Summer Olympics, officially called the Games of the XXI Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event in Montreal, Quebec, in 1976, and the first Olympic Games held in Canada.

1992 Summer Olympics Games of the XXV Olympiad, held in Barcelona in 1992

The 1992 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXV Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event celebrated in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain from July 25 to August 9, 1992.

History

1919–1939: Early years

Poland national team, 1924 Poland NT 1924.jpg
Poland national team, 1924
Poland 5-6 Brazil, 1938 Bresil-Pologne1938.jpg
Poland 5–6 Brazil, 1938

The first football federation was established on 25 June 1911 in Lwów as the Polish Football Union (Związek Polski Piłki Nożnej). After I World War members of PFU established on 20 December 1919 in Warsaw the Polish Football Federation (Polski Związek Piłki Nożnej). Poland would play its first official international match on 18 December 1921 in Budapest, where the side lost to Hungary 1–0. Their first international win would come on 28 May 1922 where they took on Sweden in Stockholm and beat them 2–1. Poland qualified for their first ever World Cup in 1937 when they beat Yugoslavia 4–0 and lost 1–0 in the two qualifying matches and ensured their place in the 1938 World Cup in France.

Lviv City of regional significance in Lviv Oblast, Ukraine

Lviv is the largest city in western Ukraine and the seventh-largest city in the country overall, with a population of around 728,350 as of 2016. Lviv is one of the main cultural centres of Ukraine.

Warsaw City metropolis in Masovia, Poland

Warsaw is the capital and largest city of Poland. The metropolis stands on the Vistula River in east-central Poland and its population is officially estimated at 1.770 million residents within a greater metropolitan area of 3.1 million residents, which makes Warsaw the 8th most-populous capital city in the European Union. The city limits cover 516.9 square kilometres (199.6 sq mi), while the metropolitan area covers 6,100.43 square kilometres (2,355.39 sq mi). Warsaw is an alpha global city, a major international tourist destination, and a significant cultural, political and economic hub. Its historical Old Town was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Budapest Capital city in Hungary

Budapest is the capital and the most populous city of Hungary, and the tenth-largest city in the European Union by population within city limits. The city had an estimated population of 1,752,704 in 2016 distributed over a land area of about 525 square kilometres. Budapest is both a city and county, and forms the centre of the Budapest metropolitan area, which has an area of 7,626 square kilometres and a population of 3,303,786, comprising 33 percent of the population of Hungary.

During their debut in the World Cup, Poland would play Brazil in a match which would become one of the most memorable matches in World Cup history. Despite Brazil not being regarded as the world's top team in the 1930s, it was still believed to be a hard-to-beat side, having participated in two first World Cups. Under these circumstances, the Polish team – which had never before participated on such a level – was expected to lose the game against the South Americans. Thus, the defeat was not a sensation. However, all fans were surprised at the style with which the Poles played their lone game of the tournament. The white and reds got to the extra time, only then losing 5–6. Ernest Wilimowski, who played for Ruch Chorzów at the time, scored four of Poland's five goals, which to date is one of the most impressive individual performances in the history of the World Cup.

The Brazil national football team represents Brazil in international men's association football. Brazil is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Ruch Chorzów association football club in Poland

Ruch Chorzów is a Polish association football club based in Chorzów, Upper Silesia. It is one of the most successful football teams in Poland: fourteen-time national champions, and three-time winners of the Polish Cup. Currently the team plays in the Polish Third Division. Their stadium capacity is 9,300 seats. Ruch Chorzów has also had a very successful female handball team.

Poland played what would be their last international match before the outbreak of World War II against Hungary, the runners-up in the 1938 World Cup. The match stands out as an achievement as Poland defeated the strongly favored Hungarian side 4–2.

Kazimierz Gorski, Head Coach of the National Team between 1971 and 1976. Kazimierz Gorski (1973).jpg
Kazimierz Górski, Head Coach of the National Team between 1971 and 1976.

1946–1974: Beginnings

On 11 June 1946, following the aftermath of World War II, Poland played their first international friendly match, against Norway in Oslo, a 3–1 defeat. The biggest success in the early years after the war was the victory against one of Europe's best at the time, Czechoslovakia. Poland defeated their southern neighbors 3–1.

Poland suffered the worst defeat in the team's history on 26 April 1948 with a 0–8 loss to the Danish side. Poland would later erase that memory as they posted their second highest ever victory in Szczecin when they took down Norway 9–0 on 4 September 1963. The game marked the debut for Włodzimierz Lubański. He scored one of the goals in the game. Lubański became the all-time top scorer for Poland while playing from 1963 to 1980 scoring 48 goals in 75 appearances. This victory was surpassed on 1 April 2009 in Kielce when Poland defeated San Marino 10–0.

On 1 December 1970, Polish football history would change forever all due to one man. Kazimierz Górski was named head coach of the national team. His success with the team was evident from the start with a gold medal at the 1972 Summer Olympics. Górski would later lead the team to another medal at the 1976 Olympics where they captured silver. However, nothing matched the two bronze medals at the 1974 and 1982 World Cups.

1974–1986: "Golden Era"

Grzegorz Lato (left) Bundesarchiv Bild 183-N0706-0040, Fussball-WM, VR Polen - Brasilien 1-0.jpg
Grzegorz Lato (left)

Poland being mostly unknown on the international football scene before 1974 shook up the football world during the World Cup in Germany. However, this was no huge surprise as the core of the team successfully achieved a gold medal place in the Munich Olympics in 1972. The Olympics were not considered a major tournament by most Western nations, but Eastern European countries bypassed the amateur rules by fielding their full national teams, as most players also had employment with national industries or within the army. With their lightning speed and incredible team chemistry they were almost unstoppable. In qualifying they surprised everyone by eliminating England, quarter-finalists in 1970 and Champions in 1966.

Poland celebrates a victory over Brazil in the 1974 World Cup. Bundesarchiv Bild 183-N0706-0039, Fussball-WM, VR Polen - Brasilien 1-0.jpg
Poland celebrates a victory over Brazil in the 1974 World Cup.

In their opening match of Germany '74 Poland met Argentina, a team that was appearing in their 6th World Cup. Within eight minutes Poland were up 2–0, Grzegorz Lato opened the scoring in the seventh minute and just a minute later Andrzej Szarmach doubled the lead. In the 60th minute, Argentina cut the lead in half when Ramon Heredia scored. Two minutes later, however, Lato scored his second, which turned out to be the winning goal as Carlos Babington gave Argentina their second in the 66th. The match finished 3–2 for Poland.

Kazimierz Deyna (no 12) in the arms of teammates, Henryk Kasperczak, left Andrzej Szarmach, right Grzegorz Lato (no 16) after shooting 2:0 goal during 2:1 match Poland-Italy in the 1974 World Cup Bundesarchiv Bild 183-N0623-0018, Fussball-WM, VR Polen - Italien 2-1.jpg
Kazimierz Deyna (no 12) in the arms of teammates, Henryk Kasperczak, left Andrzej Szarmach, right Grzegorz Lato (no 16) after shooting 2:0 goal during 2:1 match Poland-Italy in the 1974 World Cup

Poland thrashed Haiti 7–0 in their second game. The goals included a hat-trick from Szarmach and two from Lato. In their final match of the first stage, Poland met Italy, who finished second at the previous World Cup in 1970. Poland were already through to the Second Round but needed at least a draw to win the group. At half-time, Poland was leading 2–0 on goals from Andrzej Szarmach and Kazimierz Deyna. It was not until the 86th minute that Italy managed a consolation goal through Fabio Capello. This gave Poland their third consecutive win, which led them to win the group. In the second round, Poland first won 1–0 against a Swedish side, which had not conceded any goals in their first three matches. Lato scored the only goal of the game. Next was Yugoslavia, who had drawn with Brazil and Scotland and won 9–0 against Zaire in the first round. Poland was awarded a penalty in the 24th minute and took the lead when Deyna converted. Stanislav Karasi tied it up for Yugoslavia in the 43rd. Lato won it for Poland again when he scored in the 62nd, making the final score 2–1 in Poland's favour.

On 3 July 1974 came the game that could have sent Poland into the 1974 World Cup Final. They played against the eventual champions West Germany. It had rained all day long, the field was entirely flooded. Poland wanted the game postponed but the Austrian referee would not agree. The game went ahead. Poland needed a win to be in the final, a draw was enough for the Germans. But in the miserably wet conditions, Poland's speed was of no use since the ball would not roll like it does on a dry field. Gerd Müller scored the winning goal in the 76th minute for Germany. The whole country was crushed. Poland would end the amazing run with a 1–0 victory over Brazil in the third place game. Lato scored the winning goal his seventh of the tournament crowning him the top scorer of the World Cup.

In qualifying, Poland denied Portugal their second World Cup appearance when in 1966 they had captured third place. Poland opened the World Cup against their rivals from four years prior and the current Champions, West Germany. This time the match ended in a 0–0 draw.

Grzegorz Lato continued his scoring ways with the only goal in the 1–0 win over African side Tunisia in the second game. In the final first round match Poland met Mexico. Zbigniew Boniek playing in his first World Cup opened the scoring in the 43rd minute. The Mexicans drew level through Víctor Rangel in the 52nd minute, but four minutes later Kazimierz Deyna put Poland ahead once again. Then Boniek scored his second in the 84th to secure the 3–1 win.

In the second round, Poland met three South American teams. In 1974, Poland had played and won against both Argentina and Brazil, both teams would get their revenge this time around. First, Argentina beat the Poles 2–0 with two goals from tournament top scorer Mario Kempes. Poland then defeated Peru 1–0 with a goal from Andrzej Szarmach. In what was Poland's last match of this World Cup, Brazil opened the scoring in the 12th minute on a goal from Nelinho. Even though Lato equalized one minute before half-time, it was not to be for Poland: two goals from Roberto in the 57th and 62nd minutes wrapped up the 3–1 win for Brazil.

Zbigniew Boniek, top scorer for Poland in the 1982 World Cup. Nederland tegen Polen 0-0 in Olympisch Stadion in Amsterdam Lazarek, nr. 11, 12, Bestanddeelnr 933-8193.jpg
Zbigniew Boniek, top scorer for Poland in the 1982 World Cup.

On 29 November 1980, a dispute between players and technical staff began at a hotel in Warsaw, ending in the Okęcie Airport. Following the incident, several players of the Poland national team were banned from international duty, also leading to the resignation of Ryszard Kulesza as head coach of the team. [4] At the 1982 FIFA World Cup, Poland were drawn in a group with Italy, Cameroon and Peru. [5] The first two games were consecutive 0–0 draws with Italy and Cameroon, but the final group game of the first round ended in a 5–1 win for Poland, meaning they would advance to the second round as group winners. [6] [7] [8]

In the first game of the second round, Poland beat Belgium 3–0; with a hat-trick from Boniek securing him a classic performance in the match, but the player would also receive a yellow card in the following match. [9] [10] Nevertheless, Poland advanced as group winners to the knockout stage. [5] However, Poland would eventually be stopped in the semi-finals, losing 0–2 to Italy and ending the dream of playing at the World Cup final once again; but also securing a place in the third place play-off. [11] In the third place play-off, Poland beat France 3–2, with the game also being regarded as "the end of the golden era of Polish football". [12]

Wlodzimierz Smolarek; goalscorer of the game against Portugal, won 1-0 by Poland. Wlodzimierz Smolarek by Slawek.jpg
Włodzimierz Smolarek; goalscorer of the game against Portugal, won 1–0 by Poland.

In 1986 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Poland finished top of the qualifying group; with 3 wins, 2 draws and 1 defeat. [13] Poland's biggest win of the qualifying phase was a 4–1 win over Greece, meanwhile Poland's biggest defeat was a 0–2 defeat to Belgium. [14] [15]

At the 1986 FIFA World Cup, Poland were drawn into a group with England, Morocco and Portugal. [16] The first match was a 0–0 draw, and in the second match, beat Portugal 1–0. [17] [18] In the final group game, they lost 0–3 to England, but Poland still advanced into the knockout stage, as a result of Morocco winning 3–1 over Portugal. [19] [20] In the round of sixteen, Poland were eliminated after suffering a 4–0 defeat to Brazil. [21]

Andrzej Juskowiak; top goalscorer for Poland in Euro 1996 qualifying (3 goals) and 1998 World Cup qualifying. (7 goals). Andrzej Juskowiak.jpeg
Andrzej Juskowiak; top goalscorer for Poland in Euro 1996 qualifying (3 goals) and 1998 World Cup qualifying. (7 goals).

1986–2001: Decline

After the "Golden Era" from the 1970s and 1980s, Poland suffered a severe drought in international football; they didn't qualify for three consecutive editions of the FIFA World Cup, failing to qualify in 1990, 1994 and 1998.

In 1990 World Cup qualifying, Poland finished 3rd in the qualifying group, behind Sweden and England, on 5 points with two wins, one draw and three defeats. [22] They began qualifying for the 1990 edition with a 1–0 win over Albania, before defeats to Sweden (2–1) and England (3–0). [23] [24] [25] Poland then drew 0–0 with England, lost to Sweden 0–2 and beat Albania 2–1 in their final game, but were 4 points behind England; thus failing to qualify. [26] [27] [28]

In 1994 World Cup qualifying, Poland finished 4th in the qualifying group, behind Norway, the Netherlands and England. [29] Poland began qualifying with 1–0 win over Turkey; followed by a 2–2 draw with the Netherlands, a 1–0 win over San Marino and a 3–0 win in the reverse fixture. [30] [31] [32] [33] Afterwards, Poland drew 1–1 with England, before a 0–3 defeat in the reverse fixture. [34] [35] Afterwards, Poland would then go on to suffer consecutive defeats, losing 1–0 and 3–0 to Norway, followed by a 2–1 defeat to Turkey and a 1–3 defeat to the Netherlands in the final fixture. [36] [37] [38] [39]

In Euro 1996 qualifying, Poland drew a qualifying group with Romania, France, Slovakia, Israel and Azerbaijan. [40] Poland lost 2–1 to Israel in the first game, and would later record a 1–0 win over Azerbaijan and a 0–0 draw with France. [41] [42] [43] Later, Poland lost 2–1 to Romania, beat Israel 4–3 and Slovakia 5–0, before consecutive draws with France (1–1) and Romania (0–0). [44] [45] [46] [47] Poland lost 4–1 to Slovakia in the penultimate qualifying game, and drew 0–0 with Azerbaijan in the final group game. [48] [49]

In 1998 World Cup qualifying, Poland finished 3rd behind England and Italy. [50] They began qualifying with a 2–1 loss to England before a win over Moldova (2–1) and a 0–0 draw with Italy. [51] [52] [53] Afterwards, they suffered successive defeats to Italy (3–0) and England (0–2). [54] [55] They won the next two games; 4–1 over Georgia and 3–0 over Moldova, with Andrzej Juskowiak scoring a hat-trick against the latter. [56] [57] The final game was against Georgia, with Poland losing 0–3. [58]

The Daejeon World Cup Stadium; where the match between the United States and Poland was played, won 3-1 by Poland, Daejeon World Cup Stadium.JPG
The Daejeon World Cup Stadium; where the match between the United States and Poland was played, won 3–1 by Poland,

During the EURO 2000 Qualification. Poland was in a group with England, Sweden, Bulgaria and Luxemburg. Despite Poland being an Underdog in the group. They surprised by finishing above higher favourited Bulgarians and winning 2 games against them. Poland was third and was tied in points with England but failed to Qualify by Goal Differences.

2001–2006: Rebuild

Poland qualifying for the 2002 World Cup was significant, as it was Poland's first appearance at the World Cup finals since 1986. [59] Poland's biggest win overall at in the qualifying phase was a 4–0 win over Armenia, while Poland's biggest defeat was a 1–4 defeat to Belarus. [60] [61]

The Polish drew a group featuring South Korea, the United States and Portugal. [62] The first match was played with South Korea on 4 June; with Poland losing 2–0. [63] The second game was with Portugal on 10 June; which Poland lost 4–0. [64] Poland then played the United States in the final group game on 14 June; winning 3–1 with goals from Olisadebe, Kryszałowicz and Żewłakow. [65] Despite the win, Poland finished last in the group, with a goal difference of –4 and 3 points. [62]

Tomasz Frankowski; top goalscorer during Poland's 2006 World Cup qualifying campaign, with 7 goals, including a hat-trick against Azerbaijan. Tomasz Frankowski.jpg
Tomasz Frankowski; top goalscorer during Poland's 2006 World Cup qualifying campaign, with 7 goals, including a hat-trick against Azerbaijan.

Poland's qualifying for the 2006 FIFA World Cup was overall successful; as they won eight and lost two, without a single draw. [66] They finished behind England in the qualifying group; but as a result of being the second best second-placed team in the play-offs, they qualified automatically for the finals in Germany. [66] The biggest win of the qualifying phase for Poland was an 8–0 victory over Azerbaijan, in which Tomasz Frankowski scored a hat-trick. [67] [68] The biggest defeat of the qualifying phase for Poland were two defeats against England, losing both home and away games by a scoreline of 1–2. [69] [70]

At the 2006 World Cup, Poland drew Germany, Ecuador and Costa Rica in Group A. [71] Despite high hopes from the Polish press, media and fans, Poland's campaign at the World Cup was seen as an underachievement; as Poland lost two and won one game, finishing third in the group. [72] Poland's first match was a 2–0 defeat to Ecuador, [73] followed by a 1–0 defeat to Germany, with Oliver Neuville scoring a stoppage time winning goal; [74] with the defeat to Germany, and following Ecuador's 3–0 win over Costa Rica, officially ending Poland's chances of advancing further than the group. [75] The third and final group game saw Poland defeat Costa Rica 2–1; with Bartosz Bosacki getting on the scoresheet twice. [76] [77]

2008: Debut at the Euros

Euzebiusz Smolarek, who scored 9 goals during the qualifying phase. Euzebiusz Smolarek .jpg
Euzebiusz Smolarek, who scored 9 goals during the qualifying phase.

In Euro 2008 qualifying, Poland were drawn into a group with Portugal, Serbia, Finland, Belgium, Kazakhstan, Armenia and Azerbaijan. [78] Poland's campaign began in uncomfortable fashion; suffering a 1–3 defeat to Finland on 2 September 2006 and then drawing 1–1 with Serbia on 6 September. [79] [80] In the third match, on 7 October, Poland won 1–0 over Kazakhstan, with Euzebiusz Smolarek scoring the goal. [81] On 11 October, Poland beat Portugal 2–1 with Smolarek scoring the two goals. [82] On 15 November, they beat Belgium 1–0. [83] On 24 March 2007, Poland beat Azerbaijan 5–0, and on 28 March beat Armenia 1–0. [84] [85] On 2 June, they beat Azerbaijan 3–1 with Smolarek and Krzynówek (2) scoring. [86] On 6 June, Poland lost 1–0 to Armenia, on 8 September drew 2–2 with Portugal, and on 12 September drew 0–0 with Finland. [87] [88] [89] On 13 October, Poland beat Kazakhstan 3–1 with a hat-trick from Smolarek. [90] On 17 November, they beat Belgium 2–0 with two goals from Smolarek, and on 21 November drew 2–2 with Serbia in the final qualifying game; thus qualifying for the tournament as the 1st place team in the qualifying group following Portugal's 0–0 draw with Finland, Poland's first ever Euro appearance. [91] [92] [93]

At UEFA Euro 2008, they were drawn in Group B; with Germany, Austria and Croatia. [94] The opening match was against Germany on 8 June at the Hypo-Arena in Klagenfurt, a match that Poland lost 2–0 with two goals from Lukas Podolski. [95] In the second game, Poland drew 1–1 with Austria; taking the lead through Brazil-born Roger Guerreiro, before conceding in the third minute of stoppage time following a controversial penalty. [96] [97] The final group game was against Croatia, which Poland lost 1–0, finishing bottom of the group. [98]

2010: Disaster in World Cup qualifying

Artur Boruc, goalkeeper for Poland from 2004 to 2017, who made 65 appearances during his international career. ArturBoruc.jpg
Artur Boruc, goalkeeper for Poland from 2004 to 2017, who made 65 appearances during his international career.

In 2010 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Poland were drawn in a group with Slovakia, Slovenia, the Czech Republic, Northern Ireland and San Marino, and this has been Poland's worst qualifying campaign to date. Poland finished 5th in the group; just above San Marino, with 11 points. [99] Poland began the campaign with a 1–1 draw against Slovenia on 6 September 2008. [100] On 10 October, Poland beat San Marino 2–0. [101] On 11 October, they won 2–1 against the Czech Republic. [102] After these two wins, Poland lost consecutive matches against Slovakia (15 October, losing 1–2) and Northern Ireland (28 March 2009, losing 2–3). [103] [104] After these defeats, Poland recorded their biggest ever win, winning 10–0 against San Marino in which six different players scored, with Euzebiusz Smolarek scoring four goals, on 1 April 2009. [105] [106] On 5 September, Poland drew 1–1 with Northern Ireland and on 9 September, lost 3–0 to Slovenia. [107] [108] On 10 October, Poland lost 2–0 to the Czech Republic and on 14 October, lost 1–0 to Slovakia. [109] [110]

2012: Host of the Euros

On 18 April 2007, in Cardiff, Poland and Ukraine were selected to host UEFA Euro 2012 by the UEFA Executive Committee. The bid defeated other bids made, including one from Italy and a joint bid by Croatia and Hungary; thus becoming the third successful joint-bid made to host the UEFA European Championship, after the Netherlands and Belgium in 2000, and Austria and Switzerland in 2008.

Poland were drawn into Group A; with Greece, Russia and the Czech Republic. [111] On 8 June, the opening match played between Poland and Greece at the Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw, ended 1–1, with Poland taking the lead in the 17th minute through Robert Lewandowski before Greece equalized in the second half through Dimitris Salpingidis in the 51st minute, and in the game, both teams went down to 10 men. [112] [113] Poland's next game was on 12 June, again played at the Stadion Narodowy in Warsaw, with the game against Russia finishing 1–1, with Russia taking the lead through Alan Dzagoev in the 37th minute before Poland equalized through Błaszczykowski in the 57th minute. [114] [115] Poland's final game was against the Czech Republic, played on 16 June, at the Stadion Miejski, in Wrocław, where Poland lost 1–0 following a goal from Petr Jiráček. [116] [117] Poland finished bottom of the group, with just two points. [111]

2014: World Cup qualifying

Robert Lewandowski (center) and Arkadiusz Milk (right) playing for Poland in a friendly match against the Republic of Ireland, in 2013. Lewandowski and Milik vs Ireland 2013.jpg
Robert Lewandowski (center) and Arkadiusz Milk (right) playing for Poland in a friendly match against the Republic of Ireland, in 2013.

Poland was drawn in Group H of 2014 FIFA World Cup qualifying; with England, Ukraine, Montenegro, Moldova and San Marino. [118]

On 7 September, Poland's first qualifying match ended in a 2–2 draw with Montenegro, with goals from Błaszczykowski and Mierzejewski. [119] On 11 September, they beat Moldova 2–0 with goals from Błaszczykowski and Wawrzyniak. [120] On 17 October, Poland drew 1–1 with England, with Glik scoring the equalizing goal. [121] On 22 March 2013, Poland lost 3–1 to Ukraine, conceding two goals in the first seven minutes alone, with Piszczek scoring Poland's only goal. [122] On 26 March, Poland beat San Marino 5–0, with a brace from Lewandowski, and goals from Piszczek, Teodorczyk and Kosecki. [123] On 6 September, Poland drew 1–1 with Montenegro; with Lewandowski scoring the equalizing goal only five minutes after Poland initially conceded. [124] On 10 September, they beat San Marino 5–1, with a brace from Zieliński, and goals from Błaszczykowski, Sobota and Mierzejewski. [125] However, Poland lost the last two games against Ukraine and England; losing 1–0 and 2–0, respectively. [126] [127] [128]

2016–2018: "New Era" 2016 Euro Quarterfinal and 2018 World Cup qualifying

Adam Nawalka, former head coach of the Polish National team, 2013 to 2018 Adam Nawalka.jpg
Adam Nawałka, former head coach of the Polish National team, 2013 to 2018
Association football supporters of Polish national football team Mecz Polska - Armenia 01 ssj 20070328.jpg
Association football supporters of Polish national football team

In UEFA Euro 2016 qualifying, Poland were drawn in Group D; with Germany, Scotland, the Republic of Ireland, Georgia and Gibraltar. [129]

On 7 September 2014, Poland beat Gibraltar 7–0, with Robert Lewandowski scoring four goals, Kamil Grosicki scoring two goals and Łukasz Szukała scoring one goal. [130] [131] [132] On 11 October, Poland beat Germany 2–0, with Germany having won the 2014 FIFA World Cup only three months prior, with goals from Arkadiusz Milik and Sebastian Mila. [133] On 14 October, Poland drew 2–2 with Scotland, with goals from Krzysztof Mączyński and Milik not being enough to secure the three points. [134] On 14 November, they beat Georgia 4–0, with goals from Kamil Glik, Grzegorz Krychowiak, Mila and Milik. [135] On 29 March 2015, they drew 1–1 with the Republic of Ireland, with Sławomir Peszko; but conceded a goal from Shane Long in stoppage time. [136] On 13 June, they beat Georgia 4–0; with a goal from Milik and a hat-trick from Lewandowski. [137] On 7 September, they beat Gibraltar 8–1; with Grosicki, Lewandowski and Milik all scoring twice, and Jakub Błaszczykowski and Bartosz Kapustka. [138] On 8 October, they drew 2–2 with Scotland, with Lewandowski scoring a brace. [139] On 11 October, they beat the Republic of Ireland 2–1 with goals from Krychowiak and Lewandowski, securing automatic qualification for the Euros. [140]

Jakub Blaszczykowski playing for Poland during the Euro 2016 quarter-finals match with Portugal, on 30 June 2016. 1 Jakub Blaszczykowski.jpg
Jakub Błaszczykowski playing for Poland during the Euro 2016 quarter-finals match with Portugal, on 30 June 2016.

At the UEFA Euro 2016 finals, Poland were drawn in Group C; with Germany, Northern Ireland and Ukraine. [141]

Poland's first match was with Northern Ireland, on 12 June at the Stade de Nice in Nice; a game they won 1–0 with a goal from Arkadiusz Milik in the 51st minute. [142] The next match was with Germany at the Stade de France in Saint-Denis on 16 June; with the finishing 0–0. [143] Poland's final group game was with Ukraine on 21 June, at the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille, a game they won 1–0 with a goal from Jakub Błaszczykowski. [144] In the round of sixteen, Poland were drawn to play Switzerland on 25 June at the Stade Geoffroy-Guichard in Saint-Étienne. Poland took the lead through a goal from Błaszczykowski, but conceded a bicycle kick from Xherdan Shaqiri in the 82nd minute, finishing the game 1–1 in regular time. After even extra-time could not break the tie; Poland beat Switzerland in a penalty shootout, winning 5–4 on penalties. [145] [146] On 30 June, at the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille played with Portugal in the quarter-finals of the tournament; a game in which Poland took the lead in the 2nd minute through a goal from Robert Lewandowski before conceding a goal from Renato Sanches in the 33nd minute. The match was 1–1 even after regular time and extra-time ended; thus taking the game to penalties. Poland lost the penalty shootout, losing 5–3 with Błaszczykowski having the crucial penalty saved. [147]

Robert Lewandowski, who finished the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying campaign with 16 goals; breaking the European qualifying record for goals scored, as well as becoming all-time top goalscorer for Poland. Robert Lewandowski 2018.jpg
Robert Lewandowski, who finished the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying campaign with 16 goals; breaking the European qualifying record for goals scored, as well as becoming all-time top goalscorer for Poland.

In 2018 FIFA World Cup qualifying, Poland were drawn in Group E; with Denmark, Montenegro, Romania, Armenia and Kazakhstan. [149]

The opening match for Poland was against Kazakhstan on 4 September 2016, which Poland drew 2–2, taking a 2–0 lead through goals from Bartosz Kapustka and Robert Lewandowski, but they conceded two goals from Sergei Khizhnichenko in the second half. [150] On 8 October, Poland beat Denmark 3–2 with Lewandowski scoring a hat-trick. [151] Three days later, on 11 October, they beat Armenia 2–1, with goals from Lewandowski and an own goal from Hrayr Mkoyan. [152] On 11 November, Poland beat Romania 3–0 with Kamil Grosicki and Lewandowski (2) scoring the goals. [153] On 26 March 2017, Poland beat Montenegro 2–1 with Lewandowski and Łukasz Piszczek scoring the goals. [154] On 10 June, Poland beat Romania 3–1 with a hat-trick from Lewandowski. [155] However, on 1 September, they suffered a 4–0 defeat to Denmark, their first loss of their qualifying campaign. [156] Three days later, they beat Kazakhstan 3–0 with goals from Arkadiusz Milik, Kamil Glik and Lewandowski. [157] On 5 October, they trashed Armenia 6–1, with goals from Grosicki, Jakub Błaszczykowski, Rafał Wolski and a hat-trick from Lewandowski, who became Poland's record goalscorer in the match. [158] Three days later, on 8 October, Poland officially qualified for the tournament with a 4–2 win over Montenegro; with goals from Krzysztof Mączyński, Grosicki, Lewandowski and an own goal from Filip Stojković. [159]

Lewandowski scored 16 goals during qualifying; breaking the European qualifying scoring record, as well as becoming the all-time top goalscorer of Poland. [160] [148]

The Poland national team line-up before the third and final group game against Japan; on 28 June. Poland won the game 1-0. JAP-POL (16).jpg
The Poland national team line-up before the third and final group game against Japan; on 28 June. Poland won the game 1–0.

2018: Disappointment at the World Cup

Poland played at the 2018 FIFA World Cup, their first World Cup since 2006, in Group H; against Senegal, Colombia and Japan. [162] Despite the group being considered a close group, Poland were tipped as favorites to advance from the group. [163] [164] [165] In May 2018, Poland named the preliminary 34-man squad, and on 4 June, they named the final 23-man squad. [166] [167] The squad featured several notable players; such as elite striker Robert Lewandowski (playing at his first World Cup), VfL Wolfsburg's veteran midfielder Jakub Błaszczykowski, Monaco defender Kamil Glik (who suffered an injury two weeks prior to the start of the tournament), Napoli forward Arkadiusz Milik and Juventus goalkeeper Wojciech Szczęsny. [168]

However, despite all of this and despite being ranked 8th in the FIFA Ranking prior to the tournament, [169] Poland's tournament was disappointing overall; they lost to Senegal in the opening match, losing 1–2 on 19 June in Moscow. [170] Five days later, on 24 June, they lost to Colombia in Kazan, losing 0–3, [171] which mathematically ended their hopes of qualifying from the group and on 28 June, beat Japan 1–0 in their final group game in Volgograd. [172] Poland finished bottom of their group, and like their two previous performances in 2002 and 2006, got two losses and only won the last match. [173]

2018–2019 UEFA Nations League and UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying

The qualifying group stage draw was held on 2 December 2018 in Dublin, Republic of Ireland. The 55 teams were drawn into 10 groups: five groups of five teams (Groups A–E) and five groups of six teams (Groups F–J). Ranked at No. 10 in Pot 1, Poland was drawn into UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group G. Group G consists of six teams: Austria, Israel, Latvia, Macedonia, Poland and Slovenia, [174] where they will play against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format. [175]

The top two teams will qualify directly for the finals. Unlike previous editions, the participants of the play-offs will not be decided based on results from the qualifying group stage, but instead based on their performance in the 2018–19 UEFA Nations League. In 2018, Poland was drawn into Group 3 in the 2018–19 UEFA Nations League A, along with Portugal and Italy. Poland, which had not gotten out from the shocking 2018 World Cup nightmare, was relegated to League B with two home defeats and two away draws.

Despite this poor performance in the Nations League however, Poland opened their UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying by a single-margin 1–0 win against Austria in Vienna thanked for Krzysztof Piątek. [176] Three days later, Poland followed up their suit by beating Latvia 2–0 at home. [177]

UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group G standings

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Israel.svg Flag of North Macedonia.svg Flag of Slovenia.svg Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Latvia.svg
1Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 220030+36Qualify for final tournament 10 Jun 13 Oct 19 Nov 9 Sep 2–0
2Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 211053+24 16 Nov 5 Sep 1–1 4–2 15 Oct
3Flag of North Macedonia.svg  North Macedonia (X)211042+24 7 Jun 19 Nov 10 Oct 10 Jun 3–1
4Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 20202202 6 Sep 9 Sep 1–1 13 Oct 16 Nov
5Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 20022530 0–1 10 Oct 16 Nov 7 Jun 6 Sep
6Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 20021540 10 Oct 7 Jun 9 Sep 10 Jun 19 Nov
Updated to match(es) played on 24 March 2019. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(X) Assured of at least play-offs.

Competitive record

Jan Tomaszewski (left) and Henryk Kasperczak after 3rd place match Poland-Brazil, 1974 FIFA World Cup Bundesarchiv Bild 183-N0716-0310, Fussball-WM, VR Polen - Brasilien 1-0.jpg
Jan Tomaszewski (left) and Henryk Kasperczak after 3rd place match Poland-Brazil, 1974 FIFA World Cup
UEFA Euro 2012 in Warsaw Poland national football team Euro 2012.jpg
UEFA Euro 2012 in Warsaw
Polish anthem during Czech Republic - Poland, UEFA Euro 2012 Polish anthem and flag.jpg
Polish anthem during Czech Republic - Poland, UEFA Euro 2012
Krzysztof Maczynski playing for national team in 2013 Krzysztof Maczynski.jpg
Krzysztof Mączyński playing for national team in 2013
Portugal against Poland in the UEFA Euro 2016 Quarterfinal match 1 renato sanches 2016.jpg
Portugal against Poland in the UEFA Euro 2016 Quarterfinal match
World Cup 2018 Team including Grzegorz Krychowiak (10), Artur Jedrzejczyk (3), Rafal Kurzawa (21), Kamil Glik (15), Jan Bednarek (5), Lukasz Fabianski (22), Bartosz Bereszynski (18), Jacek Goralski (6), Piotr Zielinski (19), Robert Lewandowski (9), Kamil Grosicki (11). Poland national football team World Cup 2018.jpg
World Cup 2018 Team including Grzegorz Krychowiak (10), Artur Jędrzejczyk (3), Rafał Kurzawa (21), Kamil Glik (15), Jan Bednarek (5), Łukasz Fabiański (22), Bartosz Bereszyński (18), Jacek Góralski (6), Piotr Zieliński (19), Robert Lewandowski (9), Kamil Grosicki (11).

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enterDeclined participation
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934 Did not qualify100112
Flag of France.svg 1938 Round 111th100156210141
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950 Did not enterDeclined participation
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954 WithdrewWithdrew
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 Did not qualify530297
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 201123
Flag of England.svg 1966 62221110
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 6402198
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 Third place3rd7601165421163
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 Round 25th6312666510174
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 Third place3rd73311154400122
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 Round of 1614th4112176321106
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 Did not qualify621348
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 103251015
Flag of France.svg 1998 83141012
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 Group stage25th310237106312111
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 21st31022410802279
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 Did not qualify103251914
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 103431812
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 Group stage25th310225108112814
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026
TotalThird place8/2134165134645116602135228141

Olympic Games

Host nation(s) – YearResultPldWD*LGFGA
Flag of Greece (1822-1978).svg 1896 no Olympic football tournament
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1900 Did not enter
Flag of the United States (1896-1908).svg 1904
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 1908
Flag of Sweden.svg 1912
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1920
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1924 Round 1100105
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 1928 Did not qualify
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg 1932 no Olympic football tournament
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg 1936 Fourth place42021110
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 1948 Did not qualify
Flag of Finland.svg 1952 Round 1210123
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1956 Did not qualify
Flag of Italy.svg 1960 Group stage310275
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg 1964 Did not qualify
Flag of Mexico.svg 1968
Flag of Germany.svg 1972 Gold medalists7610215
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1976 Silver medalists5311115
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg 1980 Did not qualify
Flag of the United States.svg 1984
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg 1988
Since 1992 See Poland Olympic football team
Total6/222213275233

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualification record
YearResultPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWD*LGFGA
Flag of France.svg 1960 Did not qualify200227
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964 200204
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 6312139
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972 6222106
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 632195
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 8521134
Flag of France.svg 1984 612369
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 8323911
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 623186
Flag of England.svg 1996 103431412
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 8413128
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 8413117
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg 2008 Group stage14th301214148422412
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 302123Qualified as hosts
Flag of France.svg 2016 Quarter-finals5th523042106313310
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Germany.svg 2024
TotalQuarter-finals3/151126379100442729164110

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
YearDivisionRoundPosPldWD*LGFGA
2018–19 A Group stage
Relegated
3rd402246
2020–21 B To be determined
TotalGroup stage
League A
1/1402246
*Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background colour indicates that the tournament was won.
***Red border colour indicates tournament was held on home soil.

FIFA ranking history

Source: [178]

1993199419951996199719981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011201220132014201520162017
2829335348313243333425252224223458736655764134155

Honours

  • Quarter-finals (5th place): 2016

Team image

Names

The official FIFA country code for Poland is POL. This abbreviation is used to identify the team in FIFA, UEFA, and other matches. The same abbreviation is also used under the International Organization for Standardization. "Polish national football team" can be translated into Polish as "Reprezentacja Polski w piłce nożnej". The team's nicknames include "Biało-czerwoni" which means "The white-reds" and "Orły" which translates into "The Eagles". These are the most common names given to the Polish national football team. In English, the team is also widely known as "The White Eagles", based on Poland's national coats of arms.

National kits

The national kits of Poland reflect the colors of the national flag which are white and red. Apart from minor details (in the 1920s the socks in the home kit were striped), the design remains unchanged since 1921. The home kit consists of a white shirt, red shorts and white socks; the away kit is all red (though sometimes worn with white shorts). On the rare occasions when both home and away kits clash with the opponent's, a colours third kit is available, usually in either black or blue (currently navy blue with white-red sleeves).

The kit has traditionally been adorned with the white eagle (until 2006, the coat of arms featured the inscription "POLSKA" in capital letters above the eagle), the Polish coat of arms, and not, as with many other national teams, the national football federation logo. (The Euro 2012 kits were the first to feature the logo of the PZPN, however, when the kit was first launched it did not include the iconic coat of arms with the white eagle. After only a few matches, the Coat of arms made its return on the national kits.) Since 2009, the current kits are provided by Nike.

Kit providers

Kit providerPeriod
Flag of Poland.svg Polsport−1974
Flag of Germany.svg Adidas 1974–1992
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Admiral 1992–1993
Flag of Italy.svg Lotto 1993–1994
Flag of Germany.svg Puma 1994–1996
Flag of the United States.svg Nike 1996–1998
Flag of Germany.svg Adidas 1999
Flag of Germany.svg Puma 1999–2000
Flag of Poland.svg Tico2000
Flag of Germany.svg Puma 2001–2009
Flag of the United States.svg Nike 2009-

Stadiums

National Stadium, Warsaw Stadion Narodowy w Warszawie 20120422.jpg
National Stadium, Warsaw

Main stadiums

Silesian Stadium in Chorzów was built in 1956 and seats 47,246 people. The record attendance came on 20 October 1956, when 100,000 fans witnessed a game between Poland and the Soviet Union, with Poland winning 2–1. This holds the record for the most spectators to watch Poland. The stadium was renovated to seat 55,210 and was reopen in October 2017. In 1993, the stadium was designated as the official home stadium of the Poland national team.

A new National Stadium was constructed in Warsaw with an expected capacity of 58,145 seats. Following UEFA Euro 2012, it has been used as the venue for all qualifying matches and some friendly matches of the Poland national team.

Other stadiums

Poland national football team plays selected matches at other major Polish stadiums, including:

Results and fixtures

2019

Coaching staff

PositionName
Head Coach Flag of Poland.svg Jerzy Brzęczek
Assistant Coach Flag of Poland.svg Tomasz Mazurkiewicz
Assistant Coach Flag of Poland.svg Robert Góralczyk
Assistant Coach Flag of Poland.svg Radosław Gilewicz
Goalkeeping Coach Flag of Poland.svg Andrzej Woźniak
Fitness Coach Flag of Poland.svg Leszek Dyja

Players

Current squad

The following players have been called up for the UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying matches against Flag of Austria.svg  Austria and Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia on 21 and 24 March 2019. [179]
Caps and goals updated as of 21 March 2019 after the match against Austria.
Caps and goals including all matches officially recognized by PZPN (also those not recognized by FIFA).

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
221 GK Łukasz Fabiański (1985-04-18) 18 April 1985 (age 33)480 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
11 GK Wojciech Szczęsny (1990-04-18) 18 April 1990 (age 28)420 Flag of Italy.svg Juventus
121 GK Łukasz Skorupski (1991-05-05) 5 May 1991 (age 27)30 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna

152 DF Kamil Glik (1988-02-03) 3 February 1988 (age 31)665 Flag of France.svg Monaco
32 DF Artur Jędrzejczyk (1987-11-04) 4 November 1987 (age 31)393 Flag of Poland.svg Legia Warszawa
22 DF Michał Pazdan (1987-09-21) 21 September 1987 (age 31)370 Flag of Turkey.svg Ankaragücü
42 DF Thiago Cionek (1986-04-21) 21 April 1986 (age 32)210 Flag of Italy.svg SPAL
2 DF Bartosz Bereszyński (1992-07-12) 12 July 1992 (age 26)170 Flag of Italy.svg Sampdoria
2 DF Jan Bednarek (1996-04-12) 12 April 1996 (age 23)131 Flag of England.svg Southampton
192 DF Tomasz Kędziora (1994-06-11) 11 June 1994 (age 24)90 Flag of Ukraine.svg Dynamo Kyiv
2 DF Marcin Kamiński (1992-01-15) 15 January 1992 (age 27)70 Flag of Germany.svg Fortuna Düsseldorf
132 DF Arkadiusz Reca (1995-06-17) 17 June 1995 (age 23)40 Flag of Italy.svg Atalanta
52 DF Robert Gumny (1998-06-04) 4 June 1998 (age 20)00 Flag of Poland.svg Lech Poznań

163 MF Jakub Błaszczykowski (1985-12-14) 14 December 1985 (age 33)10621 Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Kraków
113 MF Kamil Grosicki (1988-06-08) 8 June 1988 (age 30)6612 Flag of England.svg Hull City
103 MF Grzegorz Krychowiak (1990-01-29) 29 January 1990 (age 29)613 Flag of Russia.svg Lokomotiv Moscow
203 MF Piotr Zieliński (1994-05-20) 20 May 1994 (age 24)436 Flag of Italy.svg Napoli
83 MF Karol Linetty (1995-02-02) 2 February 1995 (age 24)231 Flag of Italy.svg Sampdoria
143 MF Mateusz Klich (1990-06-13) 13 June 1990 (age 28)172 Flag of England.svg Leeds United
63 MF Jacek Góralski (1992-09-21) 21 September 1992 (age 26)90 Flag of Bulgaria.svg Ludogorets Razgrad
213 MF Przemysław Frankowski (1995-04-12) 12 April 1995 (age 24)60 Flag of the United States.svg Chicago Fire
183 MF Damian Szymański (1995-06-16) 16 June 1995 (age 23)40 Flag of Russia.svg Akhmat Grozny
173 MF Damian Kądzior (1992-06-16) 16 June 1992 (age 26)30 Flag of Croatia.svg Dinamo Zagreb
3 MF Szymon Żurkowski (1997-09-25) 25 September 1997 (age 21)00 Flag of Poland.svg Górnik Zabrze

94 FW Robert Lewandowski (Captain) (1988-08-21) 21 August 1988 (age 30)10456 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
74 FW Arkadiusz Milik (1994-02-28) 28 February 1994 (age 25)4713 Flag of Italy.svg Napoli
4 FW Dawid Kownacki (1997-03-14) 14 March 1997 (age 22)41 Flag of Germany.svg Fortuna Düsseldorf
234 FW Krzysztof Piątek (1995-07-01) 1 July 1995 (age 23)42 Flag of Italy.svg Milan

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the national team in the last 12 months.


Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Bartłomiej Drągowski (1997-08-19) 19 August 1997 (age 21)00 Flag of Italy.svg Empoli v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy , 14 October 2018
GK Bartosz Białkowski (1987-07-06) 6 July 1987 (age 31)10 Flag of England.svg Ipswich Town 2018 FIFA World Cup

DF Paweł Olkowski (1990-02-13) 13 February 1990 (age 29)130 Flag of England.svg Bolton Wanderers v. Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal , 20 November 2018
DF Rafał Pietrzak (1992-01-30) 30 January 1992 (age 27)20 Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Kraków v. Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal , 20 November 2018
DF Hubert Matynia (1995-11-04) 4 November 1995 (age 23)00 Flag of Poland.svg Pogoń Szczecin v. Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal , 20 November 2018
DF Maciej Rybus INJ (1989-08-19) 19 August 1989 (age 29)532 Flag of Russia.svg Lokomotiv Moscow v. Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland , 11 September 2018
DF Adam Dźwigała (1995-09-25) 25 September 1995 (age 23)00 Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Płock v. Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland , 11 September 2018
DF Łukasz Piszczek RET (1985-06-03) 3 June 1985 (age 33)653 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund 2018 FIFA World Cup

MF Rafał Kurzawa (1993-01-29) 29 January 1993 (age 26)70 Flag of Denmark.svg Midtjylland v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy , 14 October 2018
MF Maciej Makuszewski (1989-09-29) 29 September 1989 (age 29)50 Flag of Poland.svg Lech Poznań v. Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal , 11 October 2018 PRE
MF Taras Romanczuk (1991-11-14) 14 November 1991 (age 27)10 Flag of Poland.svg Jagiellonia Białystok v. Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland , 11 September 2018
DF Sławomir Peszko RET (1985-02-19) 19 February 1985 (age 34)442 Flag of Poland.svg Wisła Kraków 2018 FIFA World Cup
MF Paweł Dawidowicz (1995-05-20) 20 May 1995 (age 23)10 Flag of Italy.svg Hellas Verona 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE
MF Sebastian Szymański (1999-05-10) 10 May 1999 (age 19)00 Flag of Poland.svg Legia Warsaw 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE

FW Adam Buksa (1996-07-12) 12 July 1996 (age 22)00 Flag of Poland.svg Pogoń Szczecin v. Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal , 20 November 2018
FW Łukasz Teodorczyk (1991-06-03) 3 June 1991 (age 27)194 Flag of Italy.svg Udinese 2018 FIFA World Cup
FW Kamil Wilczek (1988-01-14) 14 January 1988 (age 31)30 Flag of Denmark.svg Brøndby 2018 FIFA World Cup PRE

INJ Withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Retired from the national team.

Previous squads

Notable players

Players who appeared at least 50 times for the national team or scored at least 10 goals.

Head-to-head records of Poland

Statistics updated as for 24 March 2019

Key
Positive balance(more Wins)
Neutral balance(Wins = Losses)
Negative balance(more Losses)
Opponent
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Confederation
Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 11731147+7 UEFA
Flag of Algeria.svg  Algeria 220061+5 CAF
Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra 110040+4 UEFA
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 113261218–6 CONMEBOL
Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia 7511154+11 UEFA
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 100112–1 AFC
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 106132017+4 UEFA
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 6510201+19 UEFA
Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 6222910–1 UEFA
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 197662620+6 UEFA
Flag of Bolivia (state).svg  Bolivia 220031+2 CONMEBOL
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 211032+1 UEFA
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 121291937–18 CONMEBOL
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 2411944428+16 UEFA
Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon 301203–3 CAF
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 6600204+16 CONCACAF
Flag of Chile.svg  Chile 1010220 CONMEBOL
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 220020+2 AFC
Flag of Colombia.svg  Colombia 6204810-2 CONMEBOL
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 330083+5 CONCACAF
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 511337–4 UEFA
Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus 7430145+9 UEFA
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic /Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 2774163353–20 UEFA
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2081113644–8 UEFA
Flag of Ecuador.svg  Ecuador 311154+1 CONMEBOL
Flag of Egypt.svg  Egypt 201104–4 CAF
Flag of England.svg  England 1917111130–19 UEFA
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 9711184+14 UEFA
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 3300121+11 UEFA
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 2911836725+42 UEFA
Flag of France.svg  France 163581627–11 UEFA
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 5401134+9 UEFA
Flag of East Germany.svg  East Germany 1784523230 UEFA
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany /Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 2117131234–22 UEFA
Flag of Gibraltar.svg  Gibraltar 2200151+14 UEFA
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 1810443013+17 UEFA
Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 211032+1 CONCACAF
Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 5302156+9 CONCACAF
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 3284204086–46 UEFA
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 6510135+8 UEFA
Flag of India.svg  India 110021+1 AFC
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran 220030+3 AFC
Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq 522173+4 AFC
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 27111064329+14 UEFA
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 115422214+8 UEFA
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 163761021–11 UEFA
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 110031+2 CAF
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 86021510+5 AFC
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 5410123+9 UEFA
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 1010220 AFC
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 311156–1 AFC
Flag of Kuwait.svg  Kuwait 211031+2 AFC
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 1410223715+22 UEFA
Flag of Libya.svg  Libya 110050+5 CAF
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein 110020+2 UEFA
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 12642198+11 UEFA
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 7610265+21 UEFA
Flag of North Macedonia.svg  North Macedonia 321082+6 UEFA
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 4400130+13 UEFA
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 94231013–3 CONCACAF
Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 6510102+8 UEFA
Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro 422096+3 UEFA
Flag of Morocco.svg  Morocco 412143+1 CAF
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 153661621–5 UEFA
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 211020+2 OFC
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 100101–1 CAF
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 104241413+1 UEFA
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 1912345826+32 UEFA
Flag of Paraguay.svg  Paraguay 100104–4 CONMEBOL
Flag of Peru (state).svg  Peru 330092+7 CONMEBOL
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 123541115–4 UEFA
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 35615145355–2 UEFA
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia /Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 153571429–15 UEFA
Flag of San Marino.svg  San Marino 8800331+32 UEFA
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia 430154+1 AFC
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 103521413+1 UEFA
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 100112-1 CAF
Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia /Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 2610795154–3 UEFA
Flag of Singapore.svg  Singapore 110061+5 AFC
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 83141312+1 UEFA
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 623165+1 UEFA
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 2101110 CAF
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10118827–19 UEFA
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 2684143756–19 UEFA
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 114612112+9 UEFA
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 110031+2 AFC
Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia 320131+2 CAF
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 1711333912+27 UEFA
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 8323990 UEFA
Flag of the United Arab Emirates.svg  United Arab Emirates 3300102+8 AFC
Flag of Uruguay.svg  Uruguay 412145–1 CONMEBOL
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 177373622+14 CONCACAF
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 8521105+5 UEFA
Total8053392012651,3471,101+246

Managers

Notice: Imre Pozsonyi and Leo Beenhakker were the only foreign managers to coach the Poland national football team.

Poland national team managers since 1922 [181] fromto
Jesza Poszony 1921-01-011921-12-18
Józef Szkolnikowski 1921-03-121922-05-14
Józef Lustgarten 1922-05-141922-09-03
Kazimierz Glabisz 1923-06-031923-11-01
Adam Obrubański 1924-08-101924-08-31
Tadeusz Kuchar 1925-07-191925-07-19
Tadeusz Synowiec 1925-08-301927-06-19
Tadeusz Kuchar 1928-06-101928-06-10
Stefan Loth 1928-07-011931-10-25
Józef Kałuża 1932-05-291939-08-27
Henryk Reyman 1947-06-111947-08-31
Andrzej Przeworski 1947-09-141947-10-26
Zygmunt Alfus 1948-04-041948-09-19
Andrzej Przeworski 1948-10-101948-10-17
Mieczysław Szymkowiak 1949-05-081949-11-06
Mieczysław Szymkowiak 1950-05-011950-10-22
Ryszard Koncewicz 1953-05-101956-07-22
Alfred Nowakowski 1956-08-261956-08-26
Czesław Krug 1956-10-281956-11-16
Henryk Reyman 1957-05-191958-10-05
Czesław Krug 1959-05-201962-11-28
Wiesław Motoczyński 1963-05-151965-11-01
Ryszard Koncewicz 1966-01-051966-01-05
Antoni Brzeżańczyk 1966-05-031966-07-05
Alfred Nowakowski 1966-09-111966-10-22
Michał Matyas 1966-11-171967-10-29
Ryszard Koncewicz 1968-04-241970-10-25
Kazimierz Górski 1971-05-051976-07-31
Jacek Gmoch 1976-10-161978-09-06
Ryszard Kulesza 1978-10-111980-12-07
Antoni Piechniczek 1981-01-251986-06-16
Wojciech Łazarek 1986-10-071989-06-03
Andrzej Strejlau 1989-08-231993-09-22
Lesław Ćmikiewicz 1993-10-131993-11-17
Henryk Apostel 1994-02-091995-11-15
Władysław Stachurski 1996-02-191996-05-01
Antoni Piechniczek 1996-06-021997-05-31
Krzysztof Pawlak 1997-06-141997-06-14
Janusz Wójcik 1997-09-061999-10-09
Jerzy Engel 2000-01-262002-06-14
Zbigniew Boniek 2002-07-152002-11-20
Paweł Janas 2003-02-122006-06-20
Leo Beenhakker 2006-07-112009-09-10
Stefan Majewski 2009-09-172009-10-28
Franciszek Smuda 2009-10-292012-06-16
Waldemar Fornalik 2012-07-102013-10-16
Adam Nawałka 2013-10-262018-07-30
Jerzy Brzęczek 2018-08-01present

See also

Related Research Articles

UEFA European Championship European association football tournament for mens national teams

The UEFA European Championship is the primary association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), determining the continental champion of Europe. Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the UEFA European Nations' Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Starting with the 1996 tournament, specific championships are often referred to in the form "UEFA Euro [year]"; this format has since been retroactively applied to earlier tournaments.

Portugal national football team mens national association football team representing Portugal

The Portugal national football team represents Portugal in international men's association football competition since 1921. It is controlled by the Portuguese Football Federation, the governing body for football in Portugal.

Republic of Ireland national football team Mens national association football team

The Republic of Ireland national football team represents Ireland in association football. It is governed by the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) and stages its home fixtures at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin.

Andorra national football team mens national association football team representing Andorra

The Andorra national football team represents Andorra in association football and is controlled by the Andorran Football Federation, the governing body for football in Andorra. The team has enjoyed very little success due to the Principality's tiny population, the fifth smallest of any UEFA country.

The Hungary national football team represents Hungary in international football and is controlled by the Hungarian Football Federation.

Slovakia national football team mens national football team representing Slovakia

The Slovakia national football team represents Slovakia in association football and is controlled by the Slovak Football Association (SFZ), the governing body for football in Slovakia. Slovakia's home stadium from 2019 is reconstructed Tehelné pole in capital city of Slovakia Bratislava and their head coach is Pavel Hapal. Slovakia is one of the newest national football teams in the world, having split from the Czechoslovakia national team after the dissolution of the unified state in 1993. Slovakia maintains its own national side that competes in all major professional tournaments since.

The Switzerland national football team is the national football team of Switzerland. The team is controlled by the Swiss Football Association.

Latvia national football team mens national association football team representing Latvia

The Latvia national football team represents the country in international football competitions, such as the World Cup and the European Championships. It is controlled by the Latvian Football Federation, the governing body for football in Latvia. They have never qualified for the World Cup, but they have, however, qualified for the European Championship in 2004, under Aleksandrs Starkovs.

Czech Republic national football team mens national association football team representing the Czech Republic

The Czech national football team represents the Czech Republic in association football and is controlled by the Football Association of the Czech Republic, the governing body for football in the Czech Republic. Historically, the team participated in FIFA and UEFA competitions as Bohemia, Austria-Hungary and Czechoslovakia, finishing second at the 1934 and 1962 World Cups and winning the European Championship in 1976.

Faroe Islands national football team mens national association football team representing the Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands national football team, represents the Faroe Islands in association football and is controlled by the Faroe Islands Football Association. The Faroe Islands became a member of FIFA in 1988 and UEFA in 1990 and is the fourth smallest UEFA country by population.

Kazakhstan national football team mens national association football team representing Kazakhstan

The Kazakhstan national football team represents Kazakhstan in international men's association football and is directed by Football Federation of Kazakhstan. They split from the Soviet Union national football team after independence in 1991 and joined the Asian Football Confederation's Central Asian Football Federation. After failing to qualify for the 1998 and 2002 FIFA World Cups they joined UEFA, but are yet to qualify for a FIFA World Cup or a UEFA European Championship.

Guinea-Bissau national football team national association football team

The Guinea-Bissau national football team is the national team of Guinea-Bissau and is controlled by the Football Federation of Guinea-Bissau. They are a member of the Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Listed below are the dates and results for the 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds for UEFA teams.

The Montenegro national football team has represented Montenegro in association football since 2007. It is controlled by the Football Association of Montenegro, the governing body for football in Montenegro. Montenegro's home ground is Podgorica City Stadium in Podgorica.

Jakub Błaszczykowski Polish association football player

Jakub "Kuba" Błaszczykowski is a Polish professional footballer who plays as a winger for Wisła Kraków and the Poland national team. He started his professional football at Wisła Kraków establishing himself at a young age. In 2007, he joined Borussia Dortmund, where he spent the majority of his career, making over 250 appearances and winning two Bundesliga titles, two DFL-Supercups, and one DFB-Pokal.

Robert Lewandowski Polish association football player

Robert Lewandowski is a Polish professional footballer who plays as a striker for Bayern Munich and is the captain of the Poland national team.

Milan Badelj is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Lazio and the Croatia national team. He is a member of the Croatian squad which finished as runners-up to France in 2018 FIFA World Cup.

Russia national football team mens national association football team representing Russia

The Russia national football team represents Russia in association football and is controlled by the Russian Football Union, the governing body for football in Russia. Russia is a member of UEFA, they won the first edition of the respective continental competition in 1960 as the Soviet Union.

Poland has participated in three UEFA European Championships so far: UEFA Euro 2008, UEFA Euro 2012 and UEFA Euro 2016.

References

  1. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 4 April 2019. Retrieved 4 April 2019.
  2. Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019.
  3. "Elo ratings as on September 10th, 1975". international-football.net.
  4. ""Banda czworga", czyli afera na Okęciu" . Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  5. 1 2 FIFA.com. "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain ™ - Groups - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  6. FIFA.com. "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain ™ - Matches - Italy-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  7. FIFA.com. "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain ™ - Matches - Poland-Cameroon - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  8. FIFA.com. "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain ™ - Matches - Poland-Peru - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  9. FIFA.com. "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain ™ - Matches - Poland-Belgium - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  10. FIFA.com. "1982 FIFA World Cup Spain ™ - Matches - Poland-Soviet Union - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  11. Alsos, Jan. "Planet World Cup - 1982 - Semifinal - Italy v Poland". www.planetworldcup.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  12. Alsos, Jan. "Planet World Cup - 1982 - 3rd/4th Place Play-Off - Poland v France". www.planetworldcup.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  13. "World Cup 1986 qualifications". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  14. "WORLD CUP 1986". www.allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  15. "WORLD CUP 1986". www.allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  16. FIFA.com. "1986 FIFA World Cup Mexico ™ - Groups - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  17. FIFA.com. "1986 FIFA World Cup Mexico ™ - Matches - Morocco-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  18. Alsos, Jan. "Planet World Cup - 1986 - Group F - Poland v Portugal". www.planetworldcup.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  19. FIFA.com. "1986 FIFA World Cup Mexico ™ - Matches - England-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  20. FIFA.com. "1986 FIFA World Cup Mexico ™ - Matches - Portugal-Morocco - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  21. FIFA.com. "1986 FIFA World Cup Mexico ™ - Matches - Brazil-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  22. FIFA.com. "1990 FIFA World Cup Italy ™ - Groups - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  23. "WORLD CUP 1990". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  24. "WORLD CUP 1990". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  25. "WORLD CUP 1990". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  26. "WORLD CUP 1990". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  27. "WORLD CUP 1990". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  28. "WORLD CUP 1990". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  29. "World Cup 1994 qualifications". 11 May 2011. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  30. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  31. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  32. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  33. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  34. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  35. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  36. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  37. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  38. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  39. "World Cup 1994 QUALIFYING". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  40. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Standings – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  41. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Israel-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  42. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Poland-Azerbaijan – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  43. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Poland-France – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  44. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Romania-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  45. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Poland-Israel – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  46. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Poland-Slovakia – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  47. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - France-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  48. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Slovakia-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  49. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 1996 - History - Azerbaijan-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  50. "World Cup 1998 qualifications". www.rsssf.com. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  51. "UEFA - 1998 FIFA WORLD CUP PRELIMINARIES". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  52. "UEFA - 1998 FIFA WORLD CUP PRELIMINARIES". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  53. "UEFA - 1998 FIFA WORLD CUP PRELIMINARIES". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  54. "UEFA - 1998 FIFA WORLD CUP PRELIMINARIES". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  55. "UEFA - 1998 FIFA WORLD CUP PRELIMINARIES". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  56. "UEFA - 1998 FIFA WORLD CUP PRELIMINARIES". allworldcup.narod.ru. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  57. "Moldova national football team lost to Poland 0:3, 7 October 1997". eu-football.info. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  58. "Georgia national football team defeated Poland 3:0, 11 October 1997". eu-football.info. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  59. "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan ™ - Groups". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  60. "Poland v Armenia, 28 March 2001". 11v11.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  61. "Belarus v Poland, 5 September 2001". 11v11.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  62. 1 2 "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan - Groups". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  63. "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan - Matches - Korea Republic-Poland". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  64. "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan - Matches - Portugal-Poland". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  65. "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan - Matches - Poland-USA". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  66. 1 2 "2006 FIFA World Cup Germany - Groups". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  67. "World Cup (Sky Sports)". skysports.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  68. "2006 FIFA World Cup Germany™". 4 February 2009. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  69. Glendenning, Barry (8 September 2004). "Poland 1 - 2 England". theguardian.com. Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  70. "England 2-1 Poland". bbc.co.uk. British Broadcasting Corporation. 12 October 2005. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  71. "2006 FIFA World Cup Germany - Groups". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  72. "2006 FIFA World Cup Germany - Groups". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  73. (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "South American Surprise Puts Ecuador Even With Germany | DW | 9 June 2006". DW.COM. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  74. "Germany 1-0 Poland". 14 June 2006. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  75. "Ecuador 3-0 Costa Rica". bbc.co.uk. British Broadcasting Corporation. 15 June 2006. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  76. "2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ - News - COSTA RICA 1-2 POLAND". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  77. "Costa Rica 1-2 Poland". bbc.co.uk. British Broadcasting Corporation. 20 June 2006. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  78. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Standings – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  79. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Finland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  80. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Serbia – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  81. uefa.com (7 October 2006). "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Kazakhstan-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  82. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Portugal – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  83. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Belgium-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  84. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Azerbaijan – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  85. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Armenia – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  86. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Azerbaijan-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  87. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Armenia-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  88. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Portugal-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  89. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Finland-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  90. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Kazakhstan – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  91. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Poland-Belgium – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  92. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Serbia-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  93. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Portugal-Finland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  94. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Standings – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  95. uefa.com (8 June 2008). "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Germany-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  96. "Austria 1-1 Poland". 12 June 2008. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  97. uefa.com (12 June 2008). "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Austria-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  98. "Poland 0-1 Croatia". 16 June 2008. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  99. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Groups - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  100. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Poland-Slovenia - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  101. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - San Marino-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  102. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Poland-Czech Republic - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  103. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Slovakia-Poland - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  104. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Northern Ireland-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  105. Mole, Giles (2 April 2009). "European World Cup qualifying round-up: Poland put 10 past woeful San Marino". ISSN   0307-1235 . Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  106. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Poland-San Marino - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  107. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Poland-Northern Ireland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  108. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Slovenia-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  109. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Czech Republic-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  110. FIFA.com. "2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™ - Matches - Poland-Slovakia - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  111. 1 2 uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2012 - History - Standings – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  112. "Poland 1-1 Greece". BBC Sport. 8 June 2012. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  113. uefa.com (8 June 2012). "UEFA EURO 2012 - History - Poland-Greece – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  114. uefa.com (12 June 2012). "UEFA EURO 2012 - History - Poland-Russia – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  115. Wilson, Paul (12 June 2012). "Euro 2012: Poland 1-1 Russia | Group A match report". the Guardian. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  116. "Czech Republic 1-0 Poland". BBC Sport. 16 June 2012. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  117. Hytner, David (16 June 2012). "Czech Republic 1-0 Poland | Euro 2012 match report". the Guardian. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  118. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™ - Groups - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  119. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Montenegro-Poland - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  120. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Poland-Moldova - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  121. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Poland-England - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  122. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Poland-Ukraine - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  123. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Poland-San Marino - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  124. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Poland-Montenegro - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  125. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™ - Matches - San Marino-Poland - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  126. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: Ukraine-Poland - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  127. FIFA.com. "2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™: England-Poland - Report - FIFA.com". FIFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  128. "England 2-0 Poland". BBC Sport. 15 October 2013. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  129. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2016 - History - Standings – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  130. "Highlights: Poland win 7-0 against Gibraltar whose starting XI had only two professional footballers". 8 September 2014. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  131. Sport, Telegraph (7 September 2014). "Gibraltar rocked by Poland as they slump to 7-0 rout in first competitive match". ISSN   0307-1235 . Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  132. Association, Press (7 September 2014). "Gibraltar 0-7 Poland | Euro 2016 Group D match report". the Guardian. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  133. "Poland 2-0 Germany". BBC Sport. 11 October 2014. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  134. "Poland 2-2 Scotland". BBC Sport. 14 October 2014. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  135. uefa.com (14 November 2014). "UEFA EURO 2016 - History - Georgia-Poland – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  136. "Euro 2016 Group D qualifier: Republic of Ireland 1-1 Poland". BBC Sport. 29 March 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  137. "Poland 4-0 Georgia: Hat-trick from Lewandowski sends his side top". Mail Online. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  138. uefa.com (7 September 2015). "UEFA EURO 2016 - History - Poland-Gibraltar – UEFA.com". Uefa.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  139. "Scotland 2-2 Poland". BBC Sport. 8 October 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  140. "Euro 2016 qualifiers: Poland 2-1 Republic of Ireland". BBC Sport. 11 October 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  141. uefa.com. "UEFA EURO 2016 - History - Standings – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  142. "Poland 1-0 Northern Ireland". BBC Sport. 12 June 2016. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  143. "Germany 0-0 Poland". BBC Sport. 16 June 2016. Retrieved 5 July 2018.
  144. "Ukraine 0-1 Poland". BBC Sport. 21 June 2016. Retrieved 5 July 2018.