Senegal national football team

Last updated

Senegal
Senegalese Football Federation.png
Nickname(s) Les Lions de la Téranga
(The Lions of Teranga)
Association Senegalese Football Federation
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Sub-confederation WAFU (West Africa)
Head coach Aliou Cissé
Captain Sadio Mané
Most caps Henri Camara (99)
Top scorer Henri Camara (29)
Home stadium Stade Léopold Sédar Senghor
FIFA code SEN
Kit left arm sen18a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body sen18A.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm sen18a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts sen18A.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm sen18h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body sen18H.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm sen18h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts sen18H.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 22 Increase2.svg 1 (14 June 2019) [1]
Highest23 (November 2017, December 2018, April 2019)
Lowest99 (June 2013)
Elo ranking
Current 26 Increase2.svg 1 (16 June 2019) [2]
Highest15 (November 2016)
Lowest100 (October 1994)
First international
Flag of The Gambia (1889-1965).svg  British Gambia 1–2 French Senegal Flag of Senegal (1958-1959).svg
(Gambia; 1959)
Biggest win
Flag of Senegal.svg  Senegal 7–0 Mauritius  Flag of Mauritius.svg
(Dakar, Senegal; 9 October 2010)
Biggest defeat
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 11–0 Senegal  Flag of Senegal.svg
(Prague, Czechoslovakia; 2 November 1966)
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2002 )
Best resultQuarter-Finals (2002)
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances15 (first in 1965 )
Best resultRunners-up (2002)

The Senegal national football team, nicknamed the Lions of Teranga, is the national association football team of Senegal and is controlled by the Senegalese Football Federation.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Senegal republic in Western Africa

Senegal, officially the Republic of Senegal, is a country in West Africa. Senegal is bordered by Mauritania in the north, Mali to the east, Guinea to the southeast, and Guinea-Bissau to the southwest. Senegal also borders The Gambia, a country occupying a narrow sliver of land along the banks of the Gambia River, which separates Senegal's southern region of Casamance from the rest of the country. Senegal also shares a maritime border with Cape Verde. Senegal's economic and political capital is Dakar.

Senegalese Football Federation sports governing body

The Senegalese Football Federation (FSF) is the governing body of football in Senegal. It was founded in 1960, affiliated to FIFA in 1964 and to CAF in 1963. It organizes the national football league and the national team.

Contents

Established in the early 1960s, the team have been regular competitors in the Africa Cup of Nations, where their best performance was runner-up to Cameroon in the 2002 edition in Mali. In the same year, Senegal took part at the FIFA World Cup for the first time and reached the quarter-finals, having defeated reigning champions France in the opening game. The team made their second World Cup appearance 16 years later, earning four points, being eliminated in the group stage against Japan based on fair play points.

Africa Cup of Nations main international association football competition in Africa

The CAF Africa Cup of Nations, officially CAN, also referred to as AFCON, or Total Africa Cup of Nations for sponsorship reasons, is the main international association football competition in Africa. It is sanctioned by the Confederation of African Football (CAF) and was first held in 1957. Since 1968, it has been held every two years. The title holders at the time of a FIFA Confederations Cup qualify for that competition.

FIFA World Cup association football competition for mens national teams

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The current champion is France, which won its second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

France national football team mens national association football team representing France

The France national football team represents France in international football and is controlled by the French Football Federation, also known as FFF, or in French: Fédération française de football. The team's colours are blue, white and red, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus. The French side are the reigning World Cup holders, having won the 2018 FIFA World Cup on 15 July 2018.

History

Early history

Senegal gained its independence from France on 4 April 1960, and the Senegalese Football Federation (FSF) was founded that year. The first Senegal match took place on 31 December 1961 against Dahomey (current Benin). Senegal lost 3–2.

Benin country in Africa

Benin, officially the Republic of Benin and formerly Dahomey, is a country in West Africa. It is bordered by Togo to the west, Nigeria to the east, and Burkina Faso and Niger to the north. The majority of its population lives on the small southern coastline of the Bight of Benin, part of the Gulf of Guinea in the northernmost tropical portion of the Atlantic Ocean. The capital of Benin is Porto-Novo, but the seat of government is in Cotonou, the country's largest city and economic capital. Benin covers an area of 114,763 square kilometres (44,310 sq mi) and its population in 2016 was estimated to be approximately 10.87 million. Benin is a tropical nation, highly dependent on agriculture, and is a large exporter of cotton and palm oil. Substantial employment and income arise from subsistence farming.

The Senegalese Football Federation (FSF) has been affiliated with FIFA since 1962 and has been a member of the Confederation of African Football since 1963.

Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

Senegal's first appearance in the Africa Cup of Nations was in 1965, where they finished second in their group, and lost 1–0 to Ivory Coast to finish in fourth place.

Ivory Coast national football team national association football team

The Ivory Coast national football team, nicknamed Les Éléphants, represents Ivory Coast in international football and is controlled by the Ivorian Football Federation (FIF). Until 2005, their greatest accomplishment was winning the 1992 African Cup of Nations against Ghana on penalties at the Stade Leopold Senghor in Dakar, Senegal. Their second success came in the 2015 edition, again defeating Ghana on penalties at the Estadio de Bata in Bata, Equatorial Guinea.

1990s

In the 1990 Africa Cup of Nations, Senegal finished fourth. Senegal hosted the 1992 tournament. After finishing second in their group, they were eliminated by Cameroon in the quarterfinals. Senegal qualified for four of six African championships that decade.

1990 Africa Cup of Nations football tournament

The 1990 Africa Cup of Nations was the 17th edition of the Africa Cup of Nations, the football championship of Africa (CAF). It was hosted by Algeria. Just like in 1988, the field of eight teams was split into two groups of four. Algeria won its first championship, beating Nigeria in the final 1−0.

The 1992 Africa Cup of Nations was the 18th edition of the Africa Cup of Nations, the football championship of Africa (CAF). It was hosted by Senegal. The field expanded to twelve teams, split into four groups of three; the top two teams in each group advanced to the quarterfinals. Ivory Coast won its first championship, beating Ghana on penalty kicks 11−10 after a goalless draw.

2000s

Senegal's best finish in the African Cup of Nations came in 2002, where they lost the final on a penalty shootout after drawing 0–0 with Cameroon. [3] Later that year, Senegal made their first-ever world championship appearance at the World Cup. Senegal eventually reached the quarter-finals of the World Cup, one of only three African teams to do so (the first being Cameroon in 1990; the other being Ghana in 2010). In the group, after defeating defending world champions France, they drew with Denmark and Uruguay, and beat Sweden in extra time in the round of 16, before losing to Turkey in the quarter-finals. [4] [5]

Senegalese fans at the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations against Tunisia. Africancup.jpg
Senegalese fans at the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations against Tunisia.

Senegal qualified for the 2008 Africa Cup of Nations, but finished third in their group with two points. They failed to make the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, the first World Cup to be held in Africa.

2010s

Senegal was eliminated in the 2012 African Cup of Nations with zero wins and zero points.

After Senegal's former manager Bruno Metsu died on 14 October 2013, many Senegalese players were recalled to appear and have a moment of silence in memory of the manager who helped them reach the quarter-final in the 2002 World Cup. All activities of the national league and the national team were suspended for a few days in his memory.

The West African nation narrowly missed the 2014 FIFA World Cup after losing in a round-robin match against Ivory Coast in the final qualification round. Senegal qualified for two Africa Cup of Nations tournaments since, being eliminated in the group stage in 2015 and reaching the quarterfinals in 2017. On 10 November 2017, after defeating South Africa 2–0, [6] Senegal qualified for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, [7] the second in its history after the 2002 World Cup in Japan and South Korea. [8] Senegal defeated Poland 2–1 in their opening group match. [9] The first goal was an own goal by Thiago Cionek, [10] and the second one was scored by M'Baye Niang. [11] In the next group stage match, Senegal drew 2–2 against Japan with one goal by Sadio Mané and the other by Moussa Wagué. [12] However, despite having a great advantage, they missed the opportunity by losing 0–1 to Colombia, [13] and due to poor fair play point comparing to Japan, who also lost 0–1 to Poland, [14] Senegal was eliminated in the group stage for the first time in their World Cup history. [15]

Competitive record

World Cup record

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup Qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enterDeclined participation
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934
Flag of France.svg 1938
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958
Flag of Chile.svg 1962
Flag of England.svg 1966
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 Did not qualify310224
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 201112
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 201112
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 201101
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 210111
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 Did not enterDeclined participation
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 Did not qualify83141112
Flag of France.svg 1998 201123
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 Quarter-finals7th52217610541163
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 Did not qualify10631218
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 623197
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 8341118
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 Group stage17th3111448530155
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026 To be determinedTo be determined
TotalQuarter-finals2/2183321110632622159056

Africa Cup of Nations record

Africa Cup of Nations record
Host nation(s) / YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGA
Flag of Sudan (1956-1970).svg 1957 Did not enter
Flag of Egypt.svg 1959
Flag of Ethiopia (1897-1936; 1941-1974).svg 1962
Flag of Ghana.svg 1963
Flag of Tunisia.svg 1965 Fourth place4th311152
Flag of Ethiopia (1897-1936; 1941-1974).svg 1968 Group stage5th311155
Flag of Sudan (1956-1970).svg 1970 Did not qualify
Flag of Cameroon (1961-1975).svg 1972
Flag of Egypt (1972-1984).svg 1974
Flag of Ethiopia (1975-1987).svg 1976
Flag of Ghana.svg 1978
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1980 Did not enter
Flag of Libya (1977-2011).svg 1982 Did not qualify
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg 1984
Flag of Egypt.svg 1986 Group stage5th320131
Flag of Morocco.svg 1988 Did not qualify
Flag of Algeria.svg 1990 Fourth place4th512233
Flag of Senegal.svg 1992 Quarter-finals5th310243
Flag of Tunisia.svg 1994 Quarter-finals8th310223
Flag of South Africa.svg 1996 Did not qualify
Flag of Burkina Faso.svg 1998
Flag of Ghana.svg Flag of Nigeria.svg 2000 Quarter-finals7th411266
Flag of Mali.svg 2002 Runners-up2nd642061
Flag of Tunisia.svg 2004 Quarter-finals6th412142
Flag of Egypt.svg 2006 Fourth place4th620478
Flag of Ghana.svg 2008 Group stage12th302146
Flag of Angola.svg 2010 Did not qualify
Flag of Gabon.svg Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2012 Group stage13th300336
Flag of South Africa.svg 2013 Did not qualify
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2015 Group stage9th311134
Flag of Gabon.svg 2017 Quarter-finals5th422062
Flag of Egypt.svg 2019 Qualified
Flag of Cameroon.svg 2021 To be determined
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg 2023 To be determined
Flag of Guinea.svg 2025 To be determined
TotalRunners-up14/31491612215550

African Games record

Football at the African Games has been an under-23 tournament since 1991.
African Games record
YearResultGPWDLGSGA
Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg 1965 -000000
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1973 -000000
Flag of Algeria.svg 1978 -000000
Flag of Kenya.svg 1987 -000000
1991–presentSee Senegal national under-23 football team
Total4/4000000

Results and fixtures

  Win  Draw  Loss

2018

2019

Kit history

Kit manufacturer

Kit providersPeriod
Adidas 1980–2000
Erreà 2000–2002
Le Coq Sportif 2002–2004
Puma 2004–2016
Romai [16] 2017
Puma 2017–present

Personnel

PositionName
Head Coach Flag of Senegal.svg Aliou Cissé
Assistant Coach Flag of Senegal.svg Joseph Koto
Assistant Coach II Flag of France.svg Régis Bogaert
Goalkeeping Coach Flag of Senegal.svg Tony Sylva
Team Coordinator Flag of Senegal.svg Lamine Diatta
Physical Trainer Flag of France.svg Teddy Pellerin
Media Officer Flag of Senegal.svg Ciré Soumare
Technical Director Flag of Senegal.svg Mayacine Mar
Team Doctor Flag of Senegal.svg Abdourahmane Fédior

Players

Current squad

The following 23 players were selected for the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations. [17]
Caps and goals correct as of 16 June 2019 after the game against Nigeria. [18]

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Abdoulaye Diallo (1992-03-30) 30 March 1992 (age 27)170 Flag of France.svg Rennes
161 GK Edouard Mendy (1992-03-01) 1 March 1992 (age 27)30 Flag of France.svg Reims
231 GK Alfred Gomis (1993-09-05) 5 September 1993 (age 25)50 Flag of Italy.svg SPAL

22 DF Saliou Ciss (1989-09-15) 15 September 1989 (age 29)180 Flag of France.svg Valenciennes
32 DF Kalidou Koulibaly (1991-06-20) 20 June 1991 (age 27)330 Flag of Italy.svg Napoli
42 DF Pape Abou Cissé (1995-09-14) 14 September 1995 (age 23)31 Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos
62 DF Salif Sané (1990-08-25) 25 August 1990 (age 28)300 Flag of Germany.svg Schalke 04
122 DF Youssouf Sabaly (1993-03-05) 5 March 1993 (age 26)120 Flag of France.svg Bordeaux
212 DF Lamine Gassama (1989-10-20) 20 October 1989 (age 29)390 Flag of Turkey.svg Göztepe
222 DF Moussa Wagué (1998-10-04) 4 October 1998 (age 20)151 Flag of Spain.svg Barcelona B

53 MF Idrissa Gana Gueye (1989-09-26) 26 September 1989 (age 29)643 Flag of England.svg Everton
83 MF Cheikhou Kouyaté (1989-12-21) 21 December 1989 (age 29)522 Flag of England.svg Crystal Palace
133 MF Alfred N'Diaye (1990-03-06) 6 March 1990 (age 29)291 Flag of Spain.svg Málaga
143 MF Henri Saivet (1990-10-26) 26 October 1990 (age 28)241 Flag of Turkey.svg Bursaspor
153 MF Krépin Diatta (1999-02-25) 25 February 1999 (age 20)30 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Club Brugge
173 MF Badou Ndiaye (1990-10-27) 27 October 1990 (age 28)201 Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray
203 MF Sada Thioub (1995-06-01) 1 June 1995 (age 24)20 Flag of France.svg Nîmes

74 FW Moussa Konaté (1993-04-03) 3 April 1993 (age 26)3212 Flag of France.svg Amiens
94 FW M'Baye Niang (1994-12-19) 19 December 1994 (age 24)154 Flag of France.svg Rennes
104 FW Sadio Mané (Captain) (1992-04-10) 10 April 1992 (age 27)6016 Flag of England.svg Liverpool
114 FW Keita Baldé (1995-03-08) 8 March 1995 (age 24)254 Flag of Italy.svg Internazionale
184 FW Ismaïla Sarr (1998-02-25) 25 February 1998 (age 21)223 Flag of France.svg Rennes
194 FW Mbaye Diagne (1991-10-28) 28 October 1991 (age 27)40 Flag of Turkey.svg Galatasaray

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for Senegal in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Dialy Ndiaye (1999-07-04) 4 July 1999 (age 19)00 Flag of Senegal.svg Cayor Footv. Flag of Mali.svg  Mali , 26 March 2019
GK Seydou Sy (1995-12-12) 12 December 1995 (age 23)00 Flag of France.svg Monaco v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
GK Khadim N'Diaye (1985-04-05) 5 April 1985 (age 34)290 Flag of Guinea.svg Horoya 2018 FIFA World Cup

DF Elhadji Pape Diaw (1995-09-14) 14 September 1995 (age 23)10 Flag of France.svg Angers v. Flag of Mali.svg  Mali , 26 March 2019
DF Adama Mbengue (1993-12-01) 1 December 1993 (age 25)80 Flag of France.svg Caen v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
DF Racine Coly (1995-12-08) 8 December 1995 (age 23)20 Flag of France.svg Nice v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
DF Ibrahima Mbaye (1994-11-19) 19 November 1994 (age 24)20 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
DF Kara Mbodji (1989-11-11) 11 November 1989 (age 29)475 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Anderlecht 2018 FIFA World Cup

MF Sidy Sarr (1996-06-05) 5 June 1996 (age 23)21 Flag of France.svg Châteauroux 2019 AFCON PRE
MF Cheikh N'Doye (1986-03-29) 29 March 1986 (age 33)323 Flag of France.svg Angers v. Flag of Mali.svg  Mali , 26 March 2019
MF Loum N'Diaye (1996-12-30) 30 December 1996 (age 22)10 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto v. Flag of Mali.svg  Mali , 26 March 2019
MF Amath Diédhiou (1996-07-16) 16 July 1996 (age 22)40 Flag of Spain.svg Getafe v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
MF Assane Dioussé (1997-09-20) 20 September 1997 (age 21)30 Flag of Italy.svg Chievo v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018

FW Santy Ngom (1993-03-07) 7 March 1993 (age 26)30 Flag of France.svg Nantes 2019 AFCON PRE
FW Opa Nguette (1994-07-08) 8 July 1994 (age 24)71 Flag of France.svg Metz v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
FW Habib Diallo (1995-06-18) 18 June 1995 (age 23)10 Flag of France.svg Metz v. Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea , 17 November 2018
FW Mame Biram Diouf (1987-12-16) 16 December 1987 (age 31)5110 Flag of England.svg Stoke City 2018 FIFA World Cup
FW Diafra Sakho (1989-12-24) 24 December 1989 (age 29)133 Flag of Turkey.svg Bursaspor 2018 FIFA World Cup

DEC Player refused to join the team after the call-up.
INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
RET Player has retired from international football.
SUS Suspended from the national team.

Records

As of 16 June 2019
Players in bold text are still active with Senegal.


Previous squads

FIFA World Cup

Africa Cup of Nations

Managers

Bruno Metsu, the manager of Senegal from 2000 to 2002. He guided Senegal to the quarter finals of the 2002 World Cup. Bruno Metsu 2012.jpg
Bruno Metsu, the manager of Senegal from 2000 to 2002. He guided Senegal to the quarter finals of the 2002 World Cup.
DatesName
1960–1961 Flag of Senegal.svg Raoul Diagne
1961–1979 Flag of France.svg Jules Vandooren
1979–1982 Flag of Germany.svg Otto Pfister
1982–1989 Flag of Senegal.svg Pape Alioune Diop
1989–1995 Flag of France.svg Claude Le Roy
1995–2000 Flag of Germany.svg Peter Schnittger
2000–2002 Flag of France.svg Bruno Metsu
2002–2005 Flag of France.svg Guy Stéphan
2005–2006 Flag of Senegal.svg Abdoulaye Sarr
2006–2008 Flag of Poland.svg Henryk Kasperczak
2008–2012 Flag of Senegal.svg Amara Traoré
2012–2013 Flag of Senegal.svg Joseph Koto
2013–2015 Flag of France.svg Alain Giresse
2015– Flag of Senegal.svg Aliou Cissé

Team honours

Last updated 14 August 2017

Continental tournaments

Runners-up: Silver medal africa.svg 2002

Other Tournaments and Cups

Amilcar Cabral Cup
Champions: 1979, 1980, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1991, 2001
Runners-up: 1982, 1993, 1997, 2000, 2005

See also

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