2010 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)

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2010 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)
Tournament details
Dates20 August 2008 – 18 November 2009
Teams53 (from 1 confederation)
Tournament statistics
Matches played268
Goals scored725 (2.71 per match)
Attendance6,034,605 (22,517 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Greece.svg Theofanis Gekas (10 goals)
2006
2014

The European zone of qualification for the 2010 FIFA World Cup saw 53 teams competing for 13 places at the finals. The qualification process started on 20 August 2008, nearly two months after the end of UEFA Euro 2008, and ended on 18 November 2009. The qualification process saw the first competitive matches of Montenegro.

Europe Continent in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere

Europe is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, Asia to the east, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia.

The 2010 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. A total of 205 teams entered the qualification competition, with South Africa, as the host, qualifying for the World Cup automatically. The first qualification matches were played on 25 August 2007 and qualification concluded on 18 November 2009. Overall, 2341 goals were scored over 852 matches, scoring on average 2.74 per match.

UEFA Euro 2008 2008 edition of the UEFA Euro

The 2008 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2008 or simply Euro 2008, was the 13th UEFA European Football Championship, a quadrennial football tournament contested by European nations. It took place in Austria and Switzerland from 7 to 29 June 2008.

Contents

Denmark, England, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, and Switzerland qualified in the first round by winning their groups. France, Greece, Portugal, and Slovenia qualified via the second round play-offs.

Denmark national football team mens national association football team representing Denmark

The Denmark national football team represents Denmark in international football competition, and is controlled by the Danish Football Association (DBU), the governing body for the football clubs which are organized under DBU. Denmark's home stadium is Parken Stadium in the Østerbro district of Copenhagen, and their head coach is Åge Hareide.

England national football team Mens association football team representing England

The England national football team represents England in senior men's international football and is controlled by The Football Association, the governing body for football in England. It competes in the three major international tournaments; the FIFA World Cup, the UEFA European Championship and the UEFA Nations League. England, as a country of the United Kingdom, is not a member of the International Olympic Committee and therefore the national team does not compete at the Olympic Games.

Germany national football team mens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany national football team is the men's football team that has represented Germany in international competition since 1908. It is governed by the German Football Association, founded in 1900. Ever since the DFB was reinaugurated in 1949 the team has represented the Federal Republic of Germany. Under Allied occupation and division, two other separate national teams were also recognised by FIFA: the Saarland team representing the Saarland (1950–1956) and the East German team representing the German Democratic Republic (1952–1990). Both have been absorbed along with their records by the current national team. The official name and code "Germany FR (FRG)" was shortened to "Germany (GER)" following the reunification in 1990.

Format

Teams were drawn into eight groups of six teams and one group of five teams. The nine group winners qualified directly, while the best eight second-placed teams contested home and away play off matches for the remaining four places. In determining the best eight second placed teams, the results against teams finishing last in the six team groups were not counted for consistency between the five and six team groups. [1]

Seeding

After initially proposing to use a similar system to recent World Cup and European Championship qualification (based on results across the previous two European qualification cycles), the UEFA Executive Committee decided on 27 September 2007 at its meeting in Istanbul that seeding for the qualifiers would be based on FIFA World Rankings, in accordance with the FIFA World Cup regulations (which note that where teams are ranked on "performance" criteria, the FIFA World Rankings must be used). [2]

FIFA World Rankings world ranking list

The men's FIFA World Ranking is a ranking system for men's national teams in association football, currently led by Belgium. The teams of the men's member nations of FIFA, football's world governing body, are ranked based on their game results with the most successful teams being ranked highest. The rankings were introduced in December 1992, and eight teams have held the top position, of which Brazil have spent the longest ranked first.

The FIFA World Ranking used for seeding was the most recent at the time of the preliminary draw, namely the November 2007 edition. Initially scheduled for 21 November, the release date of the ranking was moved to 23 November to include the final match days of Euro 2008 qualification. [3]

Qualifying for the UEFA Euro 2008 finals tournament took place between August 2006 and November 2007. Fifty teams were divided into seven groups. In a double round-robin system, each team played against each of the others in their group on a home-and-away basis. The winner and runner-up of each group qualified automatically for the final tournament.

The countries that eventually qualified for the final tournament are emboldened in the table below.

Pot APot BPot CPot DPot EPot F

Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
Flag of France.svg  France
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece

Flag of England.svg  England
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel

Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Flag of Serbia (2004-2010).svg  Serbia
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium

Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
Flag of North Macedonia.svg  Macedonia
Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg  Belarus
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania
Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus

Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Flag of Albania.svg  Albania
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland
Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan

Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg
Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro
Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands
Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg  San Marino

Draw

The draw for the group stage took place in Durban, South Africa on 25 November 2007. [4] During the draw, teams were drawn from the six pots A to F (see above) into the nine groups below, starting with pot F, which filled position 6 in the groups, then continued with pot E filling position 5, pot D in position 4 and so on. [5]

Durban Place in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Durban is the third most populous city in South Africa—after Johannesburg and Cape Town—and the largest city in the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal. Located on the east coast of South Africa, Durban is famous for being the busiest port in the country. It is also seen as one of the major centres of tourism because of the city's warm subtropical climate and extensive beaches. Durban forms part of the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality, which includes neighboring towns and has a population of about 3.44 million, making the combined municipality one of the biggest cities on the Indian Ocean coast of the African continent. It is also the second most important manufacturing hub in South Africa after Johannesburg. In 2015, Durban was recognised as one of the New7Wonders Cities. The city was heavily hit by flooding over 4 days from 18 April 2019, leading to 70 deaths and R650 000 000 in damage.

Summary

Table - top row: group winners, second row: group runners-up, third row: others. The winner of each group qualified for the 2010 FIFA World Cup together with winners of play-off. The play-offs took place between the eight best runners-up among all nine groups. The ninth group runner-up did not qualify.

  Group winners qualified directly for the 2010 FIFA World Cup
   Eight best runners-up advanced to the second round (play-offs)
  Other teams were eliminated after the first round
Group 1 Group 2 Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group 6 Group 7 Group 8 Group 9
Flag of Denmark.svg
Denmark
Flag of Switzerland.svg
Switzerland
Flag of Slovakia.svg
Slovakia
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Flag of Spain.svg
Spain
Flag of England.svg
England
Flag of Serbia (2004-2010).svg
Serbia
Flag of Italy.svg
Italy
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Netherlands
Flag of Portugal.svg
Portugal
Flag of Greece.svg
Greece
Flag of Slovenia.svg
Slovenia
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Flag of Ukraine.svg
Ukraine
Flag of France.svg
France
Flag of Ireland.svg
Republic of Ireland
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
Flag of Hungary.svg
Hungary
Flag of Albania.svg
Albania
Flag of Malta.svg
Malta
Flag of Latvia.svg
Latvia
Flag of Israel.svg
Israel
Flag of Luxembourg.svg
Luxembourg
Flag of Moldova.svg
Moldova
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
Czech Republic
Ulster Banner.svg
Northern Ireland
Flag of Poland.svg
Poland
Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg
San Marino
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg
Wales
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg
Azerbaijan
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg
Liechtenstein
Flag of Turkey.svg
Turkey
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg
Belgium
Flag of Estonia.svg
Estonia
Flag of Armenia.svg
Armenia
Flag of Croatia.svg
Croatia
Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg
Belarus
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg
Kazakhstan
Flag of Andorra.svg
Andorra
Flag of Austria.svg
Austria
Flag of Lithuania.svg
Lithuania
Flag of Romania.svg
Romania
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg
Faroe Islands
Flag of Bulgaria.svg
Bulgaria
Flag of Cyprus.svg
Cyprus
Flag of Montenegro.svg
Montenegro
Flag of Georgia.svg
Georgia
Flag of Scotland.svg
Scotland
Flag of North Macedonia.svg
Macedonia
Flag of Iceland.svg
Iceland

First round

Group 1

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Denmark.svg Flag of Portugal.svg Flag of Sweden.svg Flag of Hungary.svg Flag of Albania.svg Flag of Malta.svg
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 10631165+1121 1–1 1–0 0–1 3–0 3–0
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 10541175+1219 2–3 0–0 3–0 0–0 4–0
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 10532135+818 0–1 0–0 2–1 4–1 4–0
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 10514108+216 0–0 0–1 1–2 2–0 3–0
Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 1014561377 1–1 1–2 0–0 0–1 3–0
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta 10019026261 0–3 0–4 0–1 0–1 0–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 2

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Switzerland.svg Flag of Greece.svg Flag of Latvia.svg Flag of Israel.svg Flag of Luxembourg.svg Flag of Moldova.svg
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 10631188+1021 2–0 2–1 0–0 1–2 2–0
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 106222010+1020 1–2 5–2 2–1 2–1 3–0
Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia 105231815+317 2–2 0–2 1–1 2–0 3–2
Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 104422010+1016 2–2 1–1 0–1 7–0 3–1
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 10127425215 0–3 0–3 0–4 1–3 0–0
Flag of Moldova.svg  Moldova 10037618123 0–2 1–1 1–2 1–2 0–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 3

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Slovakia.svg Flag of Slovenia.svg Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Ulster Banner.svg Flag of Poland.svg Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 107122210+1222 0–2 2–2 2–1 2–1 7–0
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 10622184+1420 2–1 0–0 2–0 3–0 5–0
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 10442176+1116 1–2 1–0 0–0 2–0 7–0
Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 10433139+415 0–2 1–0 0–0 3–2 4–0
Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 103251914+511 0–1 1–1 2–1 1–1 10–0
Flag of San Marino (before 2011).svg  San Marino 100010147460 1–3 0–3 0–3 0–3 0–2
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 4

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Germany.svg Flag of Russia.svg Flag of Finland.svg Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Flag of Azerbaijan.svg Flag of Liechtenstein.svg
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10820265+2126 2–1 1–1 1–0 4–0 4–0
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 10712196+1322 0–1 3–0 2–1 2–0 3–0
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 105321414018 3–3 0–3 2–1 1–0 2–1
Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 10406912312 0–2 1–3 0–2 1–0 2–0
Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 10127414105 0–2 1–1 1–2 0–1 0–0
Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein 10028223212 0–6 0–1 1–1 0–2 0–2
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 5

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Spain.svg Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg Flag of Turkey.svg Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of Estonia.svg Flag of Armenia.svg
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 101000285+2330 1–0 1–0 5–0 3–0 4–0
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 106132513+1219 2–5 1–1 2–1 7–0 4–1
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 104331310+315 1–2 2–1 1–1 4–2 2–0
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 103161320710 1–2 2–4 2–0 3–2 2–0
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 10226924158 0–3 0–2 0–0 2–0 1–0
Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia 10118622164 1–2 0–2 0–2 2–1 2–2
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 6

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of England.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg Flag of Croatia.svg Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Flag of Andorra.svg
Flag of England.svg  England 10901346+2827 2–1 5–1 3–0 5–1 6–0
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 10631216+1521 1–0 0–0 1–0 2–1 5–0
Flag of Croatia.svg  Croatia 106221913+620 1–4 2–2 1–0 3–0 4–0
Flag of Belarus (1995-2012).svg  Belarus 104151914+513 1–3 0–0 1–3 4–0 5–1
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 102081129186 0–4 1–3 1–2 1–5 3–0
Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra 100010339360 0–2 0–6 0–2 1–3 1–3
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 7

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Serbia (2004-2010).svg Flag of France.svg Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Lithuania.svg Flag of Romania.svg Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg
Flag of Serbia (2004-2010).svg  Serbia 10712228+1422 1–1 1–0 3–0 5–0 2–0
Flag of France.svg  France 10631189+921 2–1 3–1 1–0 1–1 5–0
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 104241415114 1–3 3–1 2–1 2–1 3–1
Flag of Lithuania.svg  Lithuania 104061011112 2–1 0–1 2–0 0–1 1–0
Flag of Romania.svg  Romania 103341218612 2–3 2–2 1–1 0–3 3–1
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 10118520154 0–2 0–1 1–1 2–1 0–1
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 8

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of Italy.svg Flag of Ireland.svg Flag of Bulgaria.svg Flag of Cyprus.svg Flag of Montenegro.svg Flag of Georgia.svg
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10730187+1124 1–1 2–0 3–2 2–1 2–0
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland 10460128+418 2–2 1–1 1–0 0–0 2–1
Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 103521713+414 0–0 1–1 2–0 4–1 6–2
Flag of Cyprus.svg  Cyprus 10235141629 1–2 1–2 4–1 2–2 2–1
Flag of Montenegro.svg  Montenegro 1016391459 0–2 0–0 2–2 1–1 2–1
Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 10037719123 0–2 1–2 0–0 1–1 0–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group 9

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts Flag of the Netherlands.svg Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Scotland.svg Flag of North Macedonia.svg Flag of Iceland.svg
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 8800172+1524 2–0 3–0 4–0 2–0
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 824297+210 0–1 4–0 2–1 2–2
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8314611510 0–1 0–0 2–0 2–1
Flag of North Macedonia.svg  Macedonia 821551167 1–2 0–0 1–0 2–0
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 812571365 1–2 1–1 1–2 1–0
Source: [ citation needed ]

Ranking of second placed teams

Because one group had one team fewer than the others, matches against the sixth placed team in each group were not included in this ranking. As a result, eight matches played by each team counted for the purposes of the second placed table.

GrpTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
4 Flag of Russia.svg  Russia (A)8512156+916
2 Flag of Greece.svg  Greece (A)8512169+716
6 Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine (A)8431106+415
7 Flag of France.svg  France (A)8431129+315
3 Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia (A)8422104+614
5 Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina (A)84131912+713
1 Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal (A)834195+413
8 Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland (A)826086+212
9 Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 824297+210
Source: [ citation needed ]
Rules for classification: 1. Total points, 2. Goal difference, 3. Goals scored, 4. Goals scored away from home, 5. Disciplinary record (yellow card, –1 point; two yellow cards in the same match, –3 points; red card, –3 points; yellow card followed by a direct red card in the same match, –4 points), 6. Drawing of lots [6]
(A) Advanced to the play-offs.

Second round

The UEFA second round (often referred to as the play off stage) was contested by the best eight runners up from the nine first round groups. The winners of each of four home and away ties joined the group winners in the World Cup finals in South Africa. Norway, with 10 points, was ranked 9th so failed to qualify for the second round.

Seeding and draw

The eight teams were seeded according to the FIFA World Rankings released on 16 October (shown in parentheses in the table below). The draw for the ties was held in Zürich on 19 October, with the top four teams seeded into one pot and the bottom four teams seeded into a second. A separate draw decided the host of the first leg. [7]

Pot 1Pot 2

Flag of France.svg  France (9)
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal (10)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia (12)
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece (16)

Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine (22)
Flag of Ireland.svg  Republic of Ireland (34)
Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina (42)
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia (49)

Matches

Team 1 Agg. Team 21st leg2nd leg
Republic of Ireland  Flag of Ireland.svg 1–2 Flag of France.svg  France 0–1 1–1 (aet)
Portugal  Flag of Portugal.svg2–0Flag of Bosnia and Herzegovina.svg  Bosnia and Herzegovina 1–0 1–0
Greece  Flag of Greece.svg1–0Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 0–0 1–0
Russia  Flag of Russia.svg2–2 (a)Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia 2–1 0–1

Qualified teams

The following 13 teams from UEFA qualified for the final tournament.

TeamQualified asQualified onPrevious appearances in FIFA World Cup 1
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Group 1 winners10 October 20093 (1986, 1998, 2002)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Group 2 winners14 October 20098 (1934, 1938, 1950, 1954 , 1962, 1966, 1994, 2006)
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Group 3 winners14 October 20090 (debut)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Group 4 winners10 October 200916 (1934, 1938, 1954 2 , 1958 2 , 1962 2 , 1966 2 , 1970 2 , 1974 2 , 1978 2 , 1982 2 , 1986 2 , 1990 2 , 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006 )
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Group 5 winners9 September 200912 (1934, 1950, 1962, 1966, 1978, 1982 , 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006)
Flag of England.svg  England Group 6 winners9 September 200912 (1950, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1966 , 1970, 1982, 1986, 1990, 1998, 2002, 2006)
Flag of Serbia (2004-2010).svg  Serbia Group 7 winners10 October 200910 (1930 3 , 1950 3 , 1954 3 , 1958 3 , 1962 3 , 1974 3 , 1982 3 , 1990 3 , 1998 3 , 2006 3 )
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Group 8 winners10 October 200916 ( 1934 , 1938 , 1950, 1954, 1962, 1966, 1970, 1974, 1978, 1982 , 1986, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006 )
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Group 9 winners6 June 20098 (1934, 1938, 1974, 1978, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2006)
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Second round (play-off) winners18 November 20091 (1994)
Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia Second round (play-off) winners18 November 20091 (2002)
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Second round (play-off) winners18 November 20094 (1966, 1986, 2002, 2006)
Flag of France.svg  France Second round (play-off) winners18 November 200912 (1930, 1934, 1938 , 1954, 1958, 1966, 1978, 1982, 1986, 1998 , 2002, 2006)
1Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.
2 Competed as West Germany. A separate team for East Germany also participated in qualifications during this time, having only competed in 1974.
3 From 1930 to 2006, Serbia competed as Yugoslavia and Serbia and Montenegro.

Goalscorers

There were 725 goals scored over 268 games by 399 different players, for an average of 2.71 goals per game. England were the highest scorers in the European section with 34 goals. Malta did not score any goals, but did score two own goals. The top scorer was Theofanis Gekas of Greece, who scored ten goals.

Note: Goals scored in the play-offs are included.

10 goals
9 goals
7 goals
6 goals
5 goals
4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
1 own goal
2 own goals

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The European section of the 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification acted as qualifiers for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, which is being held in Russia, for national teams that are members of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). Apart from Russia, who qualified automatically as hosts, a total of 13 slots in the final tournament were available for UEFA teams.

The UEFA Second Round was contested by the best eight runners-up from the nine first round groups from the UEFA segment of the qualification tournament for the 2018 FIFA World Cup final tournament. The winners — Croatia, Denmark, Sweden, and Switzerland — of each of four home and away ties joined the group winners in the World Cup in Russia. These pairs of matches, also commonly known as the playoffs, were held in November 2017. The losers were Greece, Italy, Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland.

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.

References

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  3. "Next FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking on Friday 23 November 2007". FIFA.com. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 12 November 2007. Retrieved 21 June 2009.
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