51st FIFA Congress

Last updated
FIFA presidential election, 1998
 19948 June 1998 2002  

  Sepp Blatter.jpg Lennart johansson.jpg
Candidate Flag of Switzerland.svg Sepp Blatter Flag of Sweden.svg Lennart Johansson
Popular vote
111 / 191
80 / 191

President before election

Flag of Brazil.svg João Havelange

Next President

Flag of Switzerland.svg Sepp Blatter

The 51st FIFA Congress was held between 6 and 8 June 1998, at the Equinox congress hall in Paris, France, just before the start of the 1998 FIFA World Cup. It was the last biannual meeting of the international governing body of association football FIFA, since 1998 the congress has been held on an annual basis. [1] The congress saw the election of Joseph "Sepp" Blatter as the 8th President of FIFA who succeeded João Havelange. Havelange had held the presidency since 1974. [2] [3]

The FIFA Congress is the supreme legislative body of the International Federation of Association Football, commonly known by the acronym FIFA. FIFA is the international governing body of association football, futsal and beach soccer. The congress may be ordinary or extraordinary.

Paris Capital of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.3 million. France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Contents

1998 presidential election

Voting for the presidential election took more than three hours, with the Swedish football administrator and president of the European football governing body UEFA Lennart Johansson considered the favourite to win. Johansson's rival was the Swiss-German football executive Joseph "Sepp" Blatter who had previously been an executive at the Swiss watch manufactures Longines and had served as the general secretary of FIFA since 1981. [4] The first round of voting in the election did not produce a clear victor, with Blatter receiving 111 votes to Johansson's 80, but Johansson conceded victory. [2] [5] [6]

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Lennart Johansson Swedish footballer

Nils Lennart Johansson was the fifth and, to date, the longest serving president of UEFA, the Union of European Football Associations, from his election at UEFA's Malta Congress in 1990 until 2007.

Sepp Blatter 8th President of the International Federation of Association Football

Joseph "Sepp" Blatter is a Swiss football administrator who was the eighth President of the FIFA from 1998 to 2015. He is currently serving a six-year ban from participating in FIFA activities.

Voting results

51st FIFA Congress
8 June 1998 – Paris, France
CandidateRound 1Round 2
Flag of Switzerland.svg Sepp Blatter 111Winner
Flag of Sweden.svg Lennart Johansson 80Withdrew

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References

  1. Tom Dunmore (16 September 2011). Historical Dictionary of Soccer. Scarecrow Press. pp. 81–. ISBN   978-0-8108-7188-5.
  2. 1 2 "Blatter crowned Fifa president". BBC News Online. 5 June 1998. Retrieved 27 May 2015.
  3. Jon Garland; Dominic Malcolm; Mike Rowe (5 November 2013). The Future of Football: Challenges for the Twenty-first Century. Routledge. ISBN   978-1-135-30618-2.
  4. Alan Tomlinson (3 April 2014). FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association): The Men, the Myths and the Money. Routledge. pp. 72–. ISBN   978-1-134-44438-0.
  5. Alan Tomlinson (2005). Sport and Leisure Cultures. U of Minnesota Press. pp. 68–. ISBN   978-0-8166-3383-8.
  6. Simon Kuper and Denis Campbell (21 March 1999). "Blatter crowned Fifa president". The Observer. Retrieved 28 May 2015.