FIFA Fair Play Award

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Ball boys in Somalia hold a FIFA Fair Play banner. 2014 12 19 Somali Football-18 (15959659477).jpg
Ball boys in Somalia hold a FIFA Fair Play banner.

The FIFA Fair Play Award is a FIFA recognition of exemplary behaviour that promotes the spirit of fair play and compassion in association football around the world. First awarded in 1987, it has been presented to individuals (including posthumously), teams, fans, spectators, football associations/federations and even entire footballing communities. One or more awards are presented annually, with there being at least one recipient each year except in 1994, when no award was presented.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is a non-profit organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball.

Association football Team field sport played between two teams of eleven players with spherical ball

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Contents

Winners

Source: [1]

YearWinnerReasonNotes
1987 Flag of Scotland.svg Fans of Dundee United Fans' good behaviour towards winners IFK Göteborg in UEFA Cup Final. [2]
1988 Flag of Germany.svg Frank Ordenewitz Sporting behaviour in admitting handball in a penalty situation in a match between 1. FC Köln and Werder Bremen. [b]
Flag of South Korea.svg Spectators of the 1988 Seoul Olympic football tournament Fans' leaving a lasting impression with their sporting and composed behaviour.
1989 Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Spectators of Trinidad and Tobago Sporting behaviour despite home loss to the United States in their final match in the 1989 CONCACAF Championship.
1990 Flag of England.svg Gary Lineker Entire 15-year career as a professional football player without a yellow or red card.
1991 Flag of Spain.svg Royal Spanish Football Federation Exemplary way the government, media, schools, artists and sponsors were all involved in fair play activities.
Flag of Brazil.svg Jorginho Unique career and model behaviour both on and off the field.
1992 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Belgian Football Association Promoting fair play with its campaign ”Football in Peace“ and aid project ”Casa Hogar“ in Toluca, Mexico.
1993 Flag of Hungary.svg Nándor Hidegkuti Honoured for his model behaviour as a player and coach.
Flag of Zambia.svg The Football Association of Zambia Efforts of the reconstituted national team in the wake of 1993 Zambia national football team air disaster.
1994Not awarded
1995 Flag of France.svg Jacques Glassmann Courageous attitude as whistleblower in the Valenciennes and Marseille bribery case.
1996 Flag of Liberia.svg George Weah Demonstrating his true love for the game and projecting the message of Fair Play to the widest possible public.
1997 Flag of Ireland.svg Irish supportersExemplary behaviour, especially during the World Cup preliminary match against Belgium. [3] [l]
Flag of Slovakia.svg Jozef Zovinec (Slovak amateur player)60 years of amateur football without receiving a yellow card.
Flag of the United States.svg Julie Foudy Efforts against child labour.
1998 Flag of the United States.svg The United States Soccer Federation Sportsmanship surrounding their World Cup match, despite mutual political tensions for nearly 20 years.
Flag of Iran.svg The Football Federation Islamic Republic of Iran
Ulster Banner.svg The Irish Football Association of Northern Ireland Efforts to reunite the Catholic and Protestant communities, in a match in Belfast between Cliftonville and Linfield.
1999 Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand's football community Efforts towards making the 1999 FIFA U-17 World Championship a resounding success.
2000 Flag of South Africa.svg Lucas Radebe Working with children in South Africa and commitment to the fight against racism in football.
2001 Flag of Italy.svg Paolo Di Canio Taking ball out of play with his hands, when opposing goalkeeper Paul Gerrard was injured on the ground.
2002 Flag of Japan.svg Flag of South Korea.svg Football communities of Japan and Korea Republic Demonstrating a spirit of brotherhood and sportsmanship by co-hosting the 2002 World Cup. [4]
2003 Flag of Scotland.svg Fans of Celtic Exemplary behaviour in the 2003 UEFA Cup Final, despite Celtic losing 3–2 in extra-time to Porto. [4]
2004 Flag of Brazil.svg Brazilian Football Confederation Recognition of the “Match for Peace” played by the national teams of Brazil and Haiti, where tickets were offered in exchange for guns. [4]
2005 Flag of Peru.svg Community of Iquitos, Peru Wholehearted support of the 2005 FIFA U-17 World Championship, and contribution to football. [4]
2006 Flag of Germany.svg Fans of the 2006 World Cup Fans' fair play, mutual respect, and special atmosphere created inside and outside the stadiums. [4]
2007 Flag of Spain.svg FC Barcelona Rejecting lucrative shirt sponsorship deals and instead carrying the UNICEF logo. [5]
2008 Flag of Turkey.svg The Turkish Football Federation Encouraging dialogue between two countries which otherwise do not have any form of diplomatic relationship. [6]
Flag of Armenia.svg The Football Federation of Armenia
2009 Flag of England.svg Bobby Robson Posthumously awarded for commitment to fair play shown throughout his career as a player and coach. [7]
2010 Flag of Haiti.svg Haiti women's national under-17 football team Enduring hardships in wake of 2010 Haiti earthquake. [8]
2011 Flag of Japan.svg Japan Football Association Enduring hardships in wake of 2011 Japan earthquake, while winning the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.
2012 Flag of Uzbekistan.svg Uzbekistan Football Federation Showing that fair play and competition are not mutually exclusive but complement each other.
2013 Flag of Afghanistan.svg Afghanistan Football Federation Solidarity in football against all odds through the after-effects of war, disorder and conflict. [9]
2014 Flag of Brazil.svg Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Costa Rica.svg Flag of Morocco.svg World Cup volunteersTheir work, tireless support, enthusiasm, and passion for the game as demonstrated at the 2014 FIFA World Cup, 2014 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup, 2014 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, and 2014 FIFA Club World Cup.
2015All football organisations supporting refugees Working to support refugees in the face of conflict. Accepted on their behalf by Gerald Asamoah, who campaigns for the welfare of refugees.
2016 Flag of Colombia.svg Atlético Nacional Requested CONMEBOL to award Chapecoense with the 2016 Copa Sudamericana title after the LaMia Flight 2933 crash.
2017 Flag of Togo.svg Francis Koné Saved the life of an opponent by administering on-pitch first aid after a collision. [10]
2018 Flag of Germany.svg Lennart Thy Missed a Eredivisie match for VVV Venlo against PSV Eindhoven to donate blood for a recipient in urgent need of matching stem cells for Leukaemia treatment. [11]

Notes

SV Werder Bremen association football club in Bremen, Germany

Sportverein Werder Bremen von 1899 e. V., commonly known as Werder Bremen, is a German sports club located in Bremen in the northwest German federal state Free Hanseatic City of Bremen. The club was founded in 1899 and has grown to 40,400 members. It is best known for its association football team.

1. FC Köln German association football club

1. Fußball-Club Köln 01/07 e. V., commonly known as simply 1. FC Köln or FC Cologne in English, is a German association football club based in Cologne. It was formed in 1948 as a merger of the clubs Kölner Ballspiel-Club 1901 and SpVgg Sülz 07. Köln gained promotion back to the Bundesliga in the 2018–19 season after being relegated to 2. Bundesliga the previous season.

In 2010 the Football Association of Ireland (FAI) refused the offer of a Fair Play award following the France and Republic of Ireland 2010 World Cup Play-offs handball controversy. CEO of the FAI John Delaney called FIFA President Sepp Blatter "an embarrassment to himself and an embarrassment to FIFA" for his handling and comments following the controversy.

Football Association of Ireland Football Association of the Republic of Ireland

The Football Association of Ireland is the governing body for association football in the Republic of Ireland.

Republic of Ireland vs France was a two-legged football play-off held on 14 and 18 November 2009 between the national teams of the Republic of Ireland and France as part of the UEFA second round of qualification for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The first match was held on 14 November in Croke Park, Dublin, Ireland, and ended in a 1–0 victory for France with Nicolas Anelka scoring. The second leg, played on 18 November in the Stade de France outside Paris, France, finished 1-0 to the Republic of Ireland. The tie went to extra time and a controversial William Gallas goal made the score 2-1 on aggregate and France progressed to the World Cup at Ireland's expense.

John Delaney is an Irish sports administrator. He is executive vice-president of the Football Association of Ireland and was previously its chief officer and a member of its board for over fourteen years.

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References

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  2. Low, Dave. "Dundee Utd reach the UEFA Cup Final 1987". BBC Scotland. Retrieved 3 July 2008.
  3. 1 2 "A Night of Records and Premieres". FIFA. 24 February 1998. Archived from the original on 19 May 2008. Retrieved 19 October 2008.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 Pierrend, José Luis. "FIFA Awards - FIFA Fair Play Trophy". The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 12 January 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  5. "Barcelona scoop FIFA Fair Play award". FIFA. Archived from the original on 12 May 2008.
  6. "Fair Play for Armenia, Turkey". FIFA. 12 January 2009. Retrieved 12 January 2009.
  7. "Fair Play Award honours Robson" (Press release). FIFA. 21 December 2009. Archived from the original on 29 March 2011. Retrieved 29 March 2011.
  8. "Haiti's standard bearers show the way". FIFA. Archived from the original on 4 February 2013.
  9. "FIFA Awards Afghanistan 'Fair Play Award For 2013'". Rferl.org. 14 January 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2014.
  10. https://www.fifa.com/the-best-fifa-football-awards/news/y=2017/m=10/news=cristiano-zidane-crowned-the-best-in-london-2916647.html
  11. "Modric, Marta Crowned The Best in London". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 24 September 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2018.
  12. "International Federations" (PDF). LA84 Foundation. p. 100. Retrieved 19 October 2008.