Stanford, California

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Stanford
Stanford, California, United States Post Office, March 2019.jpg
Stanford post office
Santa Clara County California Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Stanford Highlighted.svg
Location in Santa Clara County and the state of California
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Stanford
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 37°25′21″N122°9′55″W / 37.42250°N 122.16528°W / 37.42250; -122.16528
Country United States
State California
County Santa Clara
Area
[1]
  Total2.776 sq mi (7.190 km2)
  Land2.731 sq mi (7.072 km2)
  Water0.045 sq mi (0.118 km2)  1.64%
Elevation
[2]
95 ft (29 m)
Population
 (2020) [3]
  Total21,150
  Density7,600/sq mi (2,900/km2)
Time zone UTC−8 (Pacific)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (PDT)
ZIP Codes
94305, 94309
Area code 650
FIPS code 06-73906
GNIS feature IDs 1867061, 2409994

Stanford is a census-designated place (CDP) in the northwest corner of Santa Clara County, California, United States. It is the home of Stanford University. The population was 21,150 at the 2020 census. [3]

Contents

Stanford is an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County and is adjacent to the city of Palo Alto.

The place is named after Stanford University. Most of the Stanford University campus and other core University-owned land is situated within the CDP of Stanford, though the Stanford University Medical Center, the Stanford Shopping Center, and the Stanford Research Park are officially part of the city of Palo Alto. Its resident population consists of the inhabitants of on-campus housing, including graduate student residences and single-family homes and condominiums owned by their faculty inhabitants but located on leased Stanford land. A residential neighborhood adjacent to the Stanford campus, College Terrace, featuring streets named after universities and colleges, is neither part of the Stanford CDP nor owned by the University (except for a few individual houses [4] ) but is instead part of Palo Alto.

Geography

Stanford is located at 37°25′21″N122°9′55″W / 37.42250°N 122.16528°W / 37.42250; -122.16528 (37.422590, −122.165413). [5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2), of which, 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2) is land and 0.045 square miles (0.12 km2) (1.64%) is water.

Climate

This region experiences warm, dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 77.6 °F (25.3 °C), and cool, wet winters, with no average monthly temperatures below 37.7 °F (3.2 °C). According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Stanford has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.

Climate data for Stanford, California
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)71
(22)
79
(26)
84
(29)
91
(33)
97
(36)
102
(39)
105
(41)
100
(38)
103
(39)
95
(35)
84
(29)
75
(24)
105
(41)
Mean daily maximum °F (°C)55.5
(13.1)
59.8
(15.4)
63.7
(17.6)
67.2
(19.6)
72
(22)
76.1
(24.5)
77.6
(25.3)
76.6
(24.8)
76.7
(24.8)
71.9
(22.2)
64.6
(18.1)
56.8
(13.8)
68.2
(20.1)
Daily mean °F (°C)46.6
(8.1)
50.2
(10.1)
53.2
(11.8)
56.2
(13.4)
60.1
(15.6)
63.7
(17.6)
65.6
(18.7)
65
(18)
64.1
(17.8)
59.9
(15.5)
53.3
(11.8)
48
(9)
57.2
(14.0)
Mean daily minimum °F (°C)37.7
(3.2)
40.6
(4.8)
42.7
(5.9)
45.1
(7.3)
48.2
(9.0)
51.3
(10.7)
53.5
(11.9)
53.5
(11.9)
51.5
(10.8)
47.9
(8.8)
42
(6)
39.2
(4.0)
46.1
(7.9)
Record low °F (°C)20
(−7)
25
(−4)
25
(−4)
31
(−1)
36
(2)
40
(4)
40
(4)
44
(7)
39
(4)
32
(0)
26
(−3)
22
(−6)
20
(−7)
Average rainfall inches (mm)2.7
(69)
2.7
(69)
2.1
(53)
1.1
(28)
0.5
(13)
0.1
(2.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(2.5)
0.7
(18)
1.6
(41)
3.2
(81)
14.8
(377)
Average rainy days (≥ 0.01 in)10108531001361057
Source: Climate Summary for Stanford, California

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
2000 13,314
2010 13,8093.7%
2020 21,15053.2%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]

2010

At the 2010 census Stanford had a population of 13,809. The population density was 4,974.5 inhabitants per square mile (1,920.7/km2). The racial makeup of Stanford was 7,932 (57.4%) White, 651 (4.7%) African American, 86 (0.6%) Native American, 3,777 (27.4%) Asian, 28 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 263 (1.9%) from other races, and 1,072 (7.8%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 1,439 persons (10.4%). [7]

The census reported that 55.6% of the population lived in households and 44.4% lived in non-institutionalized group quarters.

There were 3,913 households, 517 (13.2%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,159 (29.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 47 (1.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 24 (0.6%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 159 (4.1%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 15 (0.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 1,522 households (38.9%) were one person and 87 (2.2%) had someone living alone who was 65 or older. The average household size was 1.96. There were 1,230 families (31.4% of households); the average family size was 2.77.

The age distribution was 917 people (6.6%) under the age of 18, 7,914 people (57.3%) aged 18 to 24, 3,595 people (26.0%) aged 25 to 44, 762 people (5.5%) aged 45 to 64, and 621 people (4.5%) who were 65 or older. The median age was 22.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 118.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 120.1 males.

There were 3,999 housing units at an average density of 1,440.6 per square mile, of the occupied units 790 (20.2%) were owner-occupied and 3,123 (79.8%) were rented. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0.9%; the rental vacancy rate was 0.9%. 2,022 people (14.6% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 5,657 people (41.0%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

At the 2000 census there were 13,314 people, 3,207 households, and 1,330 families living in the CDP. The population density was 4,849.8 inhabitants per square mile (1,872.5/km2). There were 3,315 housing units at an average density of 1,207.4 per square mile (466.2/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 60.40% White, 4.90% Black or African American, 0.72% Native American, 25.57% Asian, 0.16% Pacific Islander, 3.65% from other races, and 4.60% from two or more races. 8.96% of the population were Hispanics or Latinos of any race. [8] Of the 3,207 households 17.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.7% were married couples living together, 1.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 58.5% were non-families. 23.0% of households were one person and 2.5% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.73.

The age distribution was 7.2% under the age of 18, 58.5% from 18 to 25, 23.7% from 25 to 45, 6.1% from 45 to 65, and 4.4% 65 or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females, there were 118.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 119.4 males.

The median household income was $41,106 and the median family income was $88,596. Males had a median income of $67,250 versus $56,991 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $22,443. About 11.1% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.6% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

The area is strongly Democratic, with 54% registered with the Democratic Party and 15% registered with the Republican Party. [9]

In the California State Legislature, Stanford is in the 13th Senate District , represented by Democrat Josh Becker, and in the 24th Assembly District , represented by Democrat Alex Lee. [10]

In the United States House of Representatives, Stanford is in California's 16th congressional district , represented by Democrat Anna Eshoo. [11]

Education

The Stanford CDP is part of the Palo Alto Unified School District which serves students kindergarten through high school. Two of the district's schools are within the boundaries of the CDP: Escondido Elementary School [12] and Lucille M. Nixon Elementary School. [13]

Preschools in the CDP include the Bing Nursery School, run by the university's School of Humanities and Sciences, [14] and the Children's Center of the Stanford Community, a parent-teacher cooperative. [15]

Notable people

The following are people who were either born or spent a significant part of their childhood living in Stanford, California.

See also

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References

  1. "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files – Places – California". United States Census Bureau.
  2. "Stanford". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  3. 1 2 "Census Data: Stanford (cdp)". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved July 14, 2021.
  4. Dremann, Sue (August 23, 2019). "Stanford is snapping up homes in College Terrace". www.paloaltoonline.com. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  6. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  7. "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA – Stanford CDP". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  8. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  9. "SD14 partisan registration". Archived from the original on August 20, 2009. Retrieved September 13, 2008.
  10. "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Archived from the original on February 1, 2015. Retrieved January 7, 2015.
  11. "California's 16th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC.
  12. "Escondido | Friends Around the World". escondido.pausd.org. Retrieved March 11, 2020. Both the street address of the school and the map of the CDP indicate it is in the CDP
  13. "Lucille M. Nixon Elementary". lmnixon.org. Retrieved March 11, 2020. Both the street address of the school and the map of the CDP indicate it is in the CDP
  14. "History of Bing Nursery School | Bing Nursery School". bingschool.stanford.edu. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  15. "CCSC – About". CCSC. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  16. Staff, Entrepreneur (April 5, 2022). "Sam Bankman-Fried, the young billionaire who wants to donate his fortune". Entrepreneur. Retrieved November 10, 2022.
  17. "John Gall Stats". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved December 3, 2012.
  18. "Marco Zappacosta". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved August 21, 2021.