Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Last updated
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Type of site
Online encyclopedia of Philosophy
OwnerThe Metaphysics Research Lab, Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University
Created by Edward N. Zalta
EditorEdward N. Zalta
Website plato.stanford.edu
Launched1995;25 years ago (1995)
ISSN 1095-5054
OCLC  number 643092515

The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) combines an online encyclopedia of philosophy with peer-reviewed publication of original papers in philosophy, freely accessible to Internet users. [1] [2] It is maintained by Stanford University. Each entry is written and maintained by an expert in the field, including professors from many academic institutions worldwide. [3] Authors contributing to the encyclopedia give Stanford University the permission to publish the articles, but retain the copyright to those articles. [4]

Contents

Approach and history

"The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Issues Faced by Academic Reference Works That May Be of Interest to Wikipedians" by Edward N. Zalta. Wikimania 2015, Mexico City

As of March 2018, the SEP has nearly 1,600 published entries. [5] Apart from its online status, the encyclopedia uses the traditional academic approach of most encyclopedias and academic journals to achieve quality by means of specialist authors selected by an editor or an editorial committee that is competent (although not necessarily considered specialists) in the field covered by the encyclopedia and peer review. [6]

The encyclopedia was created in 1995 by Edward N. Zalta, [2] with the explicit aim of providing a dynamic encyclopedia that is updated regularly, and so does not become dated in the manner of conventional print encyclopedias. [1] [7] The charter for the encyclopedia allows for rival articles on a single topic to reflect reasoned disagreements among scholars. Initially, the SEP was developed with U.S. public funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Science Foundation. A long-term fundraising plan to preserve open access to the encyclopedia is supported by many university libraries and library consortia. These institutions contribute under a plan devised by the SEP in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition, the International Coalition of Library Consortia, and the Southeastern Library Network, with matching funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. [3]

See also

Related Research Articles

Philosophy of perception PRE-CONCEIVED ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION FOR DECODIFICATION

The philosophy of perception is concerned with the nature of perceptual experience and the status of perceptual data, in particular how they relate to beliefs about, or knowledge of, the world. Any explicit account of perception requires a commitment to one of a variety of ontological or metaphysical views. Philosophers distinguish internalist accounts, which assume that perceptions of objects, and knowledge or beliefs about them, are aspects of an individual's mind, and externalist accounts, which state that they constitute real aspects of the world external to the individual. The position of naïve realism—the 'everyday' impression of physical objects constituting what is perceived—is to some extent contradicted by the occurrence of perceptual illusions and hallucinations and the relativity of perceptual experience as well as certain insights in science. Realist conceptions include phenomenalism and direct and indirect realism. Anti-realist conceptions include idealism and skepticism.

Social epistemology

Social epistemology refers to a broad set of approaches that can be taken in the study of knowledge that construes human knowledge as a collective achievement. Another way of characterizing social epistemology is as the evaluation of the social dimensions of knowledge or information. It is sometimes simplified to mean a social justification of belief.

The problem of other minds is a philosophical problem traditionally stated as the following epistemological challenge raised by the skeptic: Given that I can only observe the behavior of others, how can I know that others have minds? It is a central issue of the philosophical idea known as solipsism: the notion that for any person only one's own mind is known to exist. Solipsism maintains that no matter how sophisticated someone's behavior is, behavior on its own does not guarantee the presence of mentality.

Academic journal peer-reviewed periodical relating to a particular academic discipline

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Bastiaan Cornelis van Fraassen is a Dutch-American philosopher noted for his seminal contributions to philosophy of science. He is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at San Francisco State University and the McCosh Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Princeton University.

The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (IEP) is a scholarly online encyclopedia, dealing with philosophy, philosophical topics, and philosophers. The IEP combines open access publication with peer reviewed publication of original papers. Contribution is generally by invitation, and contributors are recognized and leading international specialists within their field.

Edward N. Zalta philosopher

Edward N. Zalta is a senior research scholar at the Center for the Study of Language and Information at Stanford University. He received his BA at Rice University in 1975 and his PhD from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1980, both in philosophy. Zalta has taught courses at Stanford University, Rice University, the University of Salzburg, and the University of Auckland. Zalta is also the Principal Editor of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Michael E. Bratman is an American philosopher who is Durfee Professor in the School of Humanities & Sciences and Professor of Philosophy at Stanford University.

Parascience is the study of subjects that are outside the scope of, or phenomena that is not recognised to exist by, the natural and social sciences because their occurrence is not established and cannot be explained by accepted scientific theory, or because it cannot be tested by conventional scientific methods.

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References

  1. 1 2 Sonnad, Nikhil; Sonnad, Nikhil. "This free online encyclopedia has achieved what Wikipedia can only dream of". Quartz. Retrieved 2018-12-07.
  2. 1 2 Zalta, Edward (2006-09-01). "The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: A university/library partnership in support of scholarly communication and open access". College & Research Libraries News. 67 (8): 502–504. doi:10.5860/crln.67.8.7670. ISSN   2150-6698.
  3. 1 2 Allen, Colin; Jagodzinski, Cecile (2013-11-04). "From SEP to SEPIA: How and Why Indiana University is Helping the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy". Against the Grain. 18 (4). doi:10.7771/2380-176x.4919. ISSN   2380-176X.
  4. "Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Copyright Information" . Retrieved December 1, 2015.
  5. "About the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy". plato.stanford.edu. Retrieved 10 October 2018.
  6. Tananbaum, Greg (2006). "I Hear the Train A Comin' -- Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy". Against the Grain. 18 (1). doi:10.7771/2380-176x.4863. ISSN   2380-176X.
  7. Allen, Colin; Nodelman, Uri; Zalta, Edward N. (2002). "The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: A Developed Dynamic Reference Work". Metaphilosophy. 33 (1&2): 210–228. doi:10.1111/1467-9973.00225. ISSN   0026-1068.