Santa Clara Valley

Last updated
Santa Clara Valley
SJ skyline at night horizontal.jpg
Stanford University Main Quad May 2011 001 (cropped).jpg
Friday May 10, 130 365 (8761584621).jpg
Almaden Lake Park 1.2 (cropped).jpg
Alviso, San Jose 1 (cropped).jpeg
AlumRockViewSiliconValley w.jpg
Clockwise: Downtown San Jose skyline; Hillsides in Morgan Hill; Alviso, San Jose; View of Santa Clara Valley; Almaden Reservoir in South San Jose; Stanford University.
Relief map of Santa Clara Valley.png
Location in California
Length90 miles (145 km)northwest–southeast
Geography
Location California, United States
Borders on San Francisco Bay (north), Santa Cruz Mountains (southwest), Diablo Range (east)
Coordinates 37°22′01″N121°59′02″W / 37.36694°N 121.98389°W / 37.36694; -121.98389 Coordinates: 37°22′01″N121°59′02″W / 37.36694°N 121.98389°W / 37.36694; -121.98389

The Santa Clara Valley is a geologic trough in Northern California that extends 90 miles (145 km) south–southeast from San Francisco to Hollister. The longitudinal valley is bordered on the west by the Santa Cruz Mountains and on the east by the Diablo Range; the two coastal ranges meet south of Hollister. The San Francisco Bay borders the valley to the north, and fills much of the northern third of the valley. [1] The valley floor is an alluvial plain that formed in the graben (tectonic depression) between the San Andreas Fault to the west and the Hayward and Calaveras faults to the east. [2] [3] Within the valley and surrounding the bay on three sides are the urban communities of San Mateo County, Santa Clara County, and Alameda County, while the narrow southern reaches of the valley extend into rural San Benito County to Hollister. In practical terms, the central portion of the Santa Clara Valley is often considered by itself, contained entirely within Santa Clara County. [1]

Contents

The valley, named after the Spanish Mission Santa Clara, was for a time known as the Valley of Heart's Delight for its high concentration of orchards, flowering trees, and plants. [4] [5] Until the 1960s it was the largest fruit-producing and packing region in the world, with 39 canneries. [6] [7] The high-tech industrial growth starting in the 1960s—later known as Silicon Valley—transformed the area from extensive agricultural tracts to an urbanized landscape.

Overview

Once primarily agricultural because of its highly fertile soil, Santa Clara Valley is now largely urbanized, although its far southern reaches south of Gilroy remain agrarian. Few traces of its agricultural past can still be found, but the Santa Clara Valley American Viticultural Area remains a large wine-making region. It was one of the first commercial wine-producing regions in California (and possibly the United States), utilizing high-quality French varietal vines imported from France. [8] [9]

The northern end of the Santa Clara Valley is at the southern tip of the San Francisco Bay, and the southern end is south of Hollister. The valley is bounded by the Santa Cruz Mountains on the southwest, which separate the valley from the Pacific Ocean, and by the Diablo Range on the northeast. The valley is approximately 93 miles (150 km) long by 15 miles (20 km) wide. [1] Its largest city is San Jose. Santa Clara Valley has a Mediterranean semi-arid climate.

Joseph S. Diller, a geologist, observed in 1915 that a "notable peculiarity" of the Santa Clara Valley is that "it is divided transversely by a scarcely noticeable soil-covered divide." [10] The northern portion is drained northward by various rivers and creeks into San Francisco Bay. The southern portion of the valley is drained southward by Llagas Creek into the Pajaro River, which in turn flows westward to Monterey Bay. As one travels across the valley floor, "the alluvial plain is continuous across the divide." [10] The summit of the transverse divide is about two miles from the former town of Madrone at elevation 345 feet (105 meters), but the alluvial plain is so continuous that most travelers are unaware they are crossing between two drainage basins. [10]

History

The earliest inhabitants on the Santa Clara Valley are the Ohlone people, who had eight distinct languages and tribes in the coastal region. [11] [12] Mission Santa Clara de Asís, which had control over a vast tract of land stretching from Palo Alto to Gilroy, was founded by Franciscans in 1777. [12] San Jose was California's first town and was also founded in 1777 by Spain as an agricultural pueblo. [12] There were 66 original settlers. In Spanish and Mexican times the land was devoted to cattle, as was most of California. Following the Mexican–American War San Jose was briefly the Capital of California. The influx of Americans (European Immigrants) resulted in relocation of many of the native Mexican and Indian people of San Jose to the mission at Santa Clara, which had been under control of Jesuits from 1850; they founded Santa Clara University there in 1851. In 1860, as an American town, the population of San Jose was 4,579, with cattle ranching still the main agricultural activity. For a time wheat became the main crop, but in the 1870s fruit gradually became the main crop and processing of fruit by drying or canning the predominant industry. The railroad reached San Jose in 1860. [13]

The Valley of Heart's Delight

"Valley of the Heart's Delight", mid 20th century Prune Orchard near Santa Clara, California (3655751146).jpg
"Valley of the Heart's Delight", mid 20th century

The valley with its scenic beauty, mild climate, and thousands of acres of blooming fruit trees was known as "The Valley of Heart's Delight". [4] [5] Various fruit cooperatives were formed in the area to deal with economic issues, including The California Fruit Union (founded in 1883) and the Santa Clara County Fruit Exchange (founded in 1892). [14] [15] Prunes were a major crop, the valley was producing the majority of prunes in California by 1900 and they were shipped internationally. [16] Water was supplied from an artesian aquifer and when the water table dropped, wells were pumped. Many orchards were small with housing and fruit growing in a dispersed pattern. By the 1920s and 1930s, the agricultural and horticultural industries were doing well in the valley and included 18 canneries, 13 dried-fruit packing houses, and 12 fresh-fruit and vegetable shipping firms, and they were shipping internationally. [17] Del Monte and Sunsweet are two brands which originated in the Santa Clara Valley.

The need for workers greatly exceeded the local population and in the nineteenth century, Chinese and Japanese immigrants met that need. Toward the end of the nineteenth century many Italians and other immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe came to the valley and worked in the orchards and canneries. During the 20th century there were Filipino immigrants and increasing numbers of immigrants from Mexico who during World War II became the dominant agricultural workforce. The town of San Jose was dominated by its business community, which was in part composed of Irish Catholics, who had a self-contained social life which did not include immigrant labor. [18] There was marked prejudice against Asians, particularly Chinese, who gradually left the valley. [19]

The Great Depression

Libby Water Tower, a heritage landmark in Sunnyvale Libby Water Tower.jpg
Libby Water Tower, a heritage landmark in Sunnyvale

Deflation and overproduction severely hurt the orchards and packers of the Santa Clara Valley during the Great Depression. Bankrupt farmers from the Dust Bowl, the Okies, made the trek to California. Desperate to feed their families they joined a workforce that was itself impacted by unemployment. The growers, with record low prices and surplus supply, could pay little. Labor organizers and goon squads battled in the labor camps. [21] Woody Guthrie's songs were on the radio and he wrote a regular column in the San Francisco-based The Daily People's World . San Francisco had a strong labor union tradition which extended to Santa Clara County. During the "March Inland" organizing drive the International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) backed the Cannery and Agricultural Workers' Industrial Union (CAWIU), a Communist-controlled union headquartered in San Jose, which had considerable success organizing farm and cannery workers in the Santa Clara Valley and elsewhere in California [21] until it was suppressed and its leaders jailed in 1934 by the State of California following sustained attacks by business, political and reactionary forces which, in San Jose, resulted in an atmosphere of terror (the low point of which was a public lynching tacitly supported by James Rolph, the Governor of California). [22] The canneries, with a segregated seasonal work force of white women, were eventually organized, at first by an AFL-affiliated company union, but one which gradually evolved, thanks to rank and file efforts, into a union which genuinely represented cannery workers. [23]

War and industry

The fruit industry gradually recovered and by the early 1940s prosperity returned to the valley. Wartime production associated with World War II brought industry to the valley such as building of marine engines for Liberty ships by the Joshua Hendy Iron Works, an historic mining and mill machinery manufacturer, now Northrop Grumman Marine Systems [24] in Sunnyvale, landing craft were built by Food Machinery Corporation (FMC later built the M113 (APC) Armored Personnel Carrier and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle as well as the XR311 at its facility in Santa Clara), and an IBM factory began manufacturing punch cards in San Jose in 1943. About 1,000 Japanese were interned, losing substantial property. Wartime production drew workers, including women, from the orchards and canneries; they were replaced by Mexican Americans from Texas and California and by Mexican braceros. Neighborhoods in East San Jose, such as the Meadowfair district, became barrios.

The Polaris missile was a Submarine Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) built during the Cold War by Lockheed Missiles & Space Division in Sunnyvale for the United States Navy while Northrop Grumman Marine Systems built the launch tubes and propulsion systems. For the most part the defense industries and traditional electronics manufacturers, with the exception of IBM, in the Santa Clara Valley were unionized, mainly by International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, and Teamsters. The United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America, a communist dominated union, but friendly to minority and women workers, gradually lost its place during the McCarthy era. [25]

Silicon Valley

In the 1950s, the first transistor industry was established in the area. Led by Stanford University research, the lower San Francisco Peninsula became home to many high-tech industries, creating the high-tech center known as Silicon Valley. [26] The name came from the silicon element used by semiconductor companies in their microchips. [27]

The borders of Silicon Valley have been variously defined. Most observers include the entirety of Santa Clara County and the southern portions of San Mateo and Alameda counties, while others extend the region northwest to San Francisco or northeast to San Ramon. [27]

San Jose

In 1950 Dutch Hamann was appointed city manager of San Jose. Hamann's boosterism was supported by Joe Ridder, publisher of the San Jose Mercury . In power until 1969, Hamann created a master plan for San Jose and embarked on a program of annexation that increased the area of San Jose from 17 square miles to 136.7 square miles. The main bargaining chip was the superior sewage system built to handle cannery waste. To overcome resistance by school districts, who otherwise would have lost their tax base, annexed areas were allowed to maintain independent school districts. This resulted in some parts of the city such as East San Jose having low-quality segregated school systems with a low tax base while school systems in other parts of San Jose have an ample tax base and high-quality schools. The population of San Jose increased from 95 thousand in 1950 to 446 thousand in 1970. There were critics: Santa Clara County Planning Director Karl Belser, who opposed urban sprawl, commented. "Perhaps the only use we will ever find for the hydrogen bomb will be to erase this great mistake from the face of the earth." Housing for each additional 1000 people took 257 acres of land. [28]

Schools

Funding for public schools in upscale communities in the Santa Clara Valley is often supplemented by grants from private foundations set up for that purpose and funded by local residents. Schools in less favorable demographics must depend on state funding. [29]

Cities and towns

Looking west, across the valley, from Alum Rock Park over northern San Jose (downtown is at far left) and other parts of the valley. The valley runs north to south in the picture. AlumRockViewSiliconValley w.jpg
Looking west, across the valley, from Alum Rock Park over northern San Jose (downtown is at far left) and other parts of the valley. The valley runs north to south in the picture.

Cities and towns in the Santa Clara Valley include (in alphabetical order):[ citation needed ]

Because so much high-tech industry has spread out from the Silicon Valley, Fremont and Newark, even though they are not in Santa Clara County, are often included in discussions about the Silicon Valley or, in the case of Fremont, referred to as the Gateway to the Silicon Valley (a title also claimed occasionally by San Jose, Union City, and several other locations). Similarly, Palo Alto, while in Santa Clara County and considered part of Silicon Valley, is on the San Francisco Peninsula.

San Jose is the largest city in the Santa Clara Valley San Jose California Skyline.jpg
San Jose is the largest city in the Santa Clara Valley
South San Francisco Bay viewed from Mission Peak Regional Preserve in Fremont South San Francisco Bay viewed from Mission Peak in Fremont, California.JPG
South San Francisco Bay viewed from Mission Peak Regional Preserve in Fremont

Notable structures

There are a number of well-known structures and sites of interest in the South Bay:

Geology

Santa Clara Valley was created by the sudden growth of the Santa Cruz Mountains and the Diablo Range during the later Cenozoic era. This was a period of intense mountain building in California when the folding and thrusting of the Earth's crust, combined with active volcanism, gave shape to the present state of California. Hence, Santa Clara Valley is a structural valley, created by mountain building as opposed to an erosional valley, which is a valley that has undergone the wearing away of the Earth's surface by natural agents. The underlying geology of the Santa Cruz Mountains was also formed by the sediment of the ancient seas, where marine shale points to Miocene origin. Today one can still find evidence of this in the Santa Cruz Mountains, where shark's teeth and the remains of maritime life are still found as high as Scotts Valley, a city nestled in the mountains. [30] The highest peak on the Santa Cruz Mountains side of the valley is Loma Prieta at 3,790 feet. The highest peak in the Diablo Range side of the valley is Mount Hamilton, specifically Copernicus Peak at 4,370 feet elevation. It is the highest peak in Santa Clara County.

The valley is a graben between the San Andreas and Hayward faults. [2]

Quicksilver mine

During the 19th century, 37,388 metric tons of mercury were extracted from the New Almaden mine south of San Jose and northwest of Santa Cruz. The area, closed for many years, resulted in pollution of the Guadalupe River and South San Francisco Bay. [31] After intermittent mining operations finally ceased in the 20th century, the area was purchased by Santa Clara County to be used as a park and was designated a National Historic Landmark. [32]

Climate

Looking west over northern San Jose (downtown is at far left) and other parts of Silicon Valley AlumRockViewSiliconValley w.jpg
Looking west over northern San Jose (downtown is at far left) and other parts of Silicon Valley

The climate of the Santa Clara Valley in California is a Mediterranean climate [33] with warm, very dry summers and mild, fairly rainy winters. Today, the Valley attracts many people from the East Coast with its warm and sunny climate. The Santa Clara Valley receives on average 330 sunny days per year. The northern areas of the valley (such as Palo Alto or Mountain View) have greater marine influences with temperatures rarely rising above 85 °F (29 °C) while in the southern areas and near the mountains (such as Los Gatos, Morgan Hill, or Gilroy) the temperature frequently exceeds 95 °F (35 °C) in the summer months. Winter is the rainy season, but still quite sunny. Winter highs range from 57 °F (14 °C) to 66 °F (19 °C) [34] while lows range from 40 °F (4 °C) to 48 °F (9 °C). Summer highs range from 82 °F (28 °C) to 95 °F (35 °C) and summer lows range from 53 °F (12 °C) to 58 °F (14 °C).

The record high for the Santa Clara Valley was recorded in Los Gatos on June 9, 2000, with a temperature of 114 °F (46 °C) and the record low was recorded in Gilroy on December 23, 1990, with a temperature of 16 °F (−9 °C). [35] Temperatures drop below 40 °F (4 °C) on average of 17 days per year, below freezing on average of 4 days per year and below 30 °F (−1 °C) on average of 0 days per year (none).

Temperatures

Climate data for San Jose, California
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)83
(28)
85
(29)
87
(31)
95
(35)
101
(38)
109
(43)
108
(42)
105
(41)
104
(40)
101
(38)
85
(29)
83
(28)
109
(43)
Average high °F (°C)62
(17)
65
(18)
70
(21)
73
(23)
77
(25)
82
(28)
84
(29)
84
(29)
81
(27)
76
(24)
65
(18)
62
(17)
72.9
(22.7)
Average low °F (°C)43
(6)
45
(7)
46
(8)
48
(9)
52
(11)
55
(13)
57
(14)
57
(14)
56
(13)
52
(11)
45
(7)
43
(6)
49.8
(9.9)
Record low °F (°C)24
(−4)
26
(−3)
30
(−1)
35
(2)
37
(3)
42
(6)
47
(8)
47
(8)
42
(6)
36
(2)
21
(−6)
20
(−7)
20
(−7)
Average precipitation inches (mm)3.2
(81)
2.8
(71)
2.6
(66)
1.0
(25)
0.4
(10)
0.1
(2.5)
0.1
(2.5)
0.1
(2.5)
0.2
(5.1)
0.9
(23)
1.2
(30)
2.0
(51)
15.1
(380)
Source: AccuWeather.com [36]

.

Climate data for Campbell, California
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)83
(28)
86
(30)
89
(32)
93
(34)
98
(37)
110
(43)
108
(42)
106
(41)
106
(41)
100
(38)
86
(30)
83
(28)
110
(43)
Average high °F (°C)63
(17)
66
(19)
71
(22)
75
(24)
79
(26)
82
(28)
85
(29)
85
(29)
82
(28)
76
(24)
66
(19)
63
(17)
74
(23)
Average low °F (°C)43
(6)
46
(8)
47
(8)
49
(9)
52
(11)
56
(13)
57
(14)
57
(14)
55
(13)
51
(11)
46
(8)
43
(6)
50
(10)
Record low °F (°C)22
(−6)
26
(−3)
29
(−2)
35
(2)
38
(3)
42
(6)
42
(6)
40
(4)
38
(3)
36
(2)
29
(−2)
19
(−7)
19
(−7)
Average precipitation inches (mm)4.7
(120)
4.1
(100)
2.6
(66)
0.6
(15)
0.3
(7.6)
0.1
(2.5)
0.1
(2.5)
0.1
(2.5)
0.3
(7.6)
0.7
(18)
2.5
(64)
4.3
(110)
21.6
(550)
[ citation needed ]
Climate data for Los Gatos, California
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)83
(28)
86
(30)
89
(32)
96
(36)
101
(38)
114
(46)
113
(45)
107
(42)
109
(43)
103
(39)
87
(31)
83
(28)
114
(46)
Average high °F (°C)63
(17)
66
(19)
72
(22)
76
(24)
80
(27)
84
(29)
86
(30)
86
(30)
84
(29)
77
(25)
66
(19)
63
(17)
75
(24)
Average low °F (°C)43
(6)
46
(8)
47
(8)
49
(9)
52
(11)
56
(13)
57
(14)
57
(14)
55
(13)
51
(11)
46
(8)
43
(6)
50
(10)
Record low °F (°C)22
(−6)
25
(−4)
28
(−2)
35
(2)
37
(3)
41
(5)
41
(5)
40
(4)
38
(3)
36
(2)
28
(−2)
19
(−7)
19
(−7)
Average precipitation inches (mm)4.9
(120)
4.1
(100)
2.8
(71)
0.6
(15)
0.3
(7.6)
0.1
(2.5)
0.1
(2.5)
0.1
(2.5)
0.3
(7.6)
0.7
(18)
2.8
(71)
4.8
(120)
22.8
(580)
[ citation needed ]
Climate data for Sunnyvale, California
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)75
(24)
84
(29)
85
(29)
94
(34)
100
(38)
107
(42)
105
(41)
101
(38)
105
(41)
100
(38)
89
(32)
75
(24)
107
(42)
Average high °F (°C)61
(16)
62
(17)
64
(18)
69
(21)
73
(23)
77
(25)
79
(26)
79
(26)
78
(26)
73
(23)
64
(18)
61
(16)
70
(21)
Average low °F (°C)42
(6)
43
(6)
46
(8)
47
(8)
51
(11)
55
(13)
57
(14)
57
(14)
55
(13)
50
(10)
44
(7)
42
(6)
49
(10)
Record low °F (°C)21
(−6)
24
(−4)
22
(−6)
31
(−1)
33
(1)
40
(4)
41
(5)
44
(7)
41
(5)
34
(1)
15
(−9)
20
(−7)
15
(−9)
Average precipitation inches (mm)3.24
(82)
3.18
(81)
2.65
(67)
0.89
(23)
0.35
(8.9)
0.11
(2.8)
0.03
(0.76)
0.08
(2.0)
0.19
(4.8)
0.85
(22)
1.83
(46)
2.31
(59)
15.71
(399.26)
Source: National Weather Service [37]
Climate data for Mountain View, California
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)59
(15)
63
(17)
64
(18)
70
(21)
73
(23)
77
(25)
79
(26)
79
(26)
79
(26)
73
(23)
64
(18)
59
(15)
70
(21)
Average low °F (°C)41
(5)
43
(6)
46
(8)
46
(8)
52
(11)
52
(11)
52
(11)
52
(11)
52
(11)
48
(9)
45
(7)
41
(5)
48
(9)
Average precipitation inches (mm)3.24
(82.3)
3.18
(80.8)
2.65
(67.3)
0.89
(22.6)
0.35
(8.9)
0.11
(2.8)
0.03
(0.8)
0.08
(2.0)
0.19
(4.8)
0.85
(21.6)
1.83
(46.5)
2.31
(58.7)
15.71
(399.1)
Source: http://www.weather.com/outlook/travel/businesstraveler/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/94043?from=text_bottomnav_business#climograph

See also

Related Research Articles

San Francisco Peninsula Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area

The San Francisco Peninsula is a peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area that separates San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean. On its northern tip is the City and County of San Francisco. Its southern base is in northern Santa Clara County, including the cities of Sunnyvale, Palo Alto, Mountain View, and Los Altos. Most of the Peninsula is occupied by San Mateo County, between San Francisco and Santa Clara counties, and including the cities and towns of Atherton, Belmont, Brisbane, Burlingame, Colma, Daly City, East Palo Alto, El Granada, Foster City, Hillsborough, Half Moon Bay, La Honda, Loma Mar, Los Altos, Menlo Park, Millbrae, Mountain View, Pacifica, Palo Alto, Pescadero, Portola Valley, Redwood City, San Bruno, San Carlos, San Mateo, South San Francisco, Sunnyvale, and Woodside.

Silicon Valley Region in California, United States

Silicon Valley is a region in Northern California that serves as a global center for high technology and innovation. Located in the southern part of the San Francisco Bay Area, it corresponds roughly to the geographical Santa Clara Valley. San Jose is Silicon Valley's largest city, the third-largest in California, and the tenth-largest in the United States; other major Silicon Valley cities include Sunnyvale, Santa Clara, Redwood City, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Menlo Park, and Cupertino. The San Jose Metropolitan Area has the third-highest GDP per capita in the world, according to the Brookings Institution, and, as of June 2021, has the highest percentage in the country of homes valued at $1 million or more.

Palo Alto, California City in California in the United States

Palo Alto is a charter city located in the northwestern corner of Santa Clara County, California, United States, in the San Francisco Bay Area. The city is named after a coastal redwood tree known as El Palo Alto.

Mountain View, California City in California, United States

Mountain View is a city in Santa Clara County, California, United States. Named for its views of the Santa Cruz Mountains, It has a population of 82,739.

Roman Catholic Diocese of San Jose in California

The Roman Catholic Diocese of San José in California is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the northern California region of the United States. It comprises Santa Clara County, and is led by a bishop. Its patron saints are Saint Joseph and Saint Clare of Assisi. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of San Francisco. Its fellow suffragans include the Dioceses of Honolulu, Las Vegas, Oakland, Reno, Sacramento, Salt Lake City, Santa Rosa and Stockton.

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority Public transportation and congestion management agency for Santa Clara County, California, United States

The Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, more commonly known simply as the Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), is a special district responsible for public transit services, congestion management, specific highway improvement projects, and countywide transportation planning for Santa Clara County, California. It serves San Jose, California and the surrounding Silicon Valley. It is one of the governing parties for the Caltrain commuter rail line that serves the county.

Joe Simitian

Saren Joseph Simitian is a California Democratic politician. From 2004 to 2012, he was the State Senator representing California's 11th State Senate district, which encompasses all or part of 13 cities in San Mateo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz counties. Approaching his term limit at the end of 2012, he ran for and was elected as a Santa Clara County Supervisor. He was re-elected to the same seat in 2016 and again in 2020.

Juana Briones de Miranda

Doña Juana Briones de Miranda was a Californio ranchera, medical practitioner, and merchant, often remembered as the "Founding Mother of San Francisco", for her noted involvement in the early development of the city of San Francisco. Later in her life, she also played an important role in developing modern Palo Alto.

Santa Clara County Library District

The Santa Clara County Library District is a public library system headquartered in Campbell, California. The library serves the communities and cities of Campbell, Cupertino, Gilroy, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, Milpitas, Monte Sereno, Morgan Hill, Saratoga, and all unincorporated areas of Santa Clara County. Other cities in Santa Clara County run their own library systems. In addition to these libraries, the library provides mobile library service with a bookmobile which visits preschools, retirement communities, migrant farmworker camps, and rural communities without easy access to library services. In 2020 SCCLD also launched a new website featuring a 24/7 online library.

Santa Clara County Superior Court

The Superior Court of California for and in the County of Santa Clara is the state trial court in and for Santa Clara County, California.

Santa Clara County, California, is one of California's original counties, with prior habitation dating from prehistory to the Alta California period.

The Northern California Rugby Football Union (NCRFU) is the Geographical Union (GU) for rugby union teams in Northern California, as well as northern Nevada. The NCRFU is part of USA Rugby.

Santa Clara County, California County in California, United States

Santa Clara County, officially the County of Santa Clara, is California's 6th most populous county, with a population of 1,936,259, as of the 2020 census. Santa Clara County and neighboring San Benito County together form the U.S. Census Bureau's San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is part of the larger San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland, CA Combined Statistical Area. Santa Clara is the most populous county in the San Francisco Bay Area and in Northern California.

There are 21 routes assigned to the "G" zone of the California Route Marker Program, which designates county routes in California. The "G" zone includes county highways in Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Clara, and Santa Cruz counties.

Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors

The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors is the board of supervisors governing Santa Clara County, California. It is made of elected representatives from each of the county's five districts.

San José–Santa Clara Regional Wastewater Facility

The San José–Santa Clara Regional Wastewater Facility is a wastewater treatment plant located in the Alviso neighborhood of San Jose, California. The facility treats 110 million U.S. gallons of wastewater per day, with a capacity of up to 167 million U.S. gal/d (630 ML/d), making it the largest tertiary treatment plant in the western United States. It serves 1.5 million residents and over 17,000 business facilities in eight cities. The 2,600-acre (1,100 ha) site is operated by the San Jose Environmental Services Department and jointly owned by the cities of San Jose and Santa Clara. It began operations in 1956 to address severe water pollution issues and played a key role in San Jose's aggressive annexation program during the 1950s and 1960s.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Poland, Joseph Fairfield; Ireland, R. L. (1988). Land Subsidence in the Santa Clara Valley, California, as of 1982. 497. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. p. F1.
  2. 1 2 "Timeline of the history of water in Santa Clara County - Santa Clara Valley Water District". Valleywater.org. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  3. Santa Clara Valley Groundwater Basin, East Bay Plain Subbasin Archived 2020-12-25 at the Wayback Machine
  4. 1 2 Matthews, Glenna (2003). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century. Stanford: Stanford University Press. p. 2. ISBN   9780804741545.
  5. 1 2 Shueh, Sam (2009). Silicon Valley. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. p. 8. ISBN   9780738570938 . Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  6. Valley of Heart's Delight : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive. Archive.org (2001-03-10). Retrieved on 2013-07-21.
  7. Golden Harvest...Fifty Years of Calpak Progress : California Packing Corporation, Industrial and Public Relations Department : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive. Archive.org. Retrieved on 2013-07-21.
  8. Santa Clara. Ohp.parks.ca.gov. Retrieved on 2013-07-21.
  9. Almaden Winery History from NCD. Awna.org (1997-01-23). Retrieved on 2013-07-21.
  10. 1 2 3 Diller, J.S. (1915). Guidebook of the Western United States — Part D: The Shasta Route and Coast Line. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. pp. 124–125.
  11. "Pre-History". San Jose History. 2013-11-04. Retrieved 2018-04-10.
  12. 1 2 3 "Early History Essay -- Santa Clara County, California". National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary. Retrieved 2018-04-10.
  13. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. p.  14. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  14. "The Santa Clara Fruit Exchange". California Digital Newspaper Collection. Pacific Rural Press, Volume 44, Number 3. 1892-07-16. Retrieved 2018-04-10.
  15. Proceedings, State Fruit Growers Convention. San Jose, California: State Board of Agriculture. 1900. p. 33 via Google Books.
  16. Arbuckle, Clyde (1985). Clyde Arbuckle's History of San Jose. Smith & McKay Printing Company. p. 160.
  17. "Looking Back: Canning in the Valley of Heart's Delight". San Jose Public Library. 2013-05-23. Retrieved 2018-04-10.
  18. Mary Bowden Carroll (1988). Ten Years in Paradise: Leaves from a Society Reporter's Note-Book (Reprint ed.). San Jose, California: San Jose Historical Museum Association. pp. entire book. Originally published in 1903
  19. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp.  14–32. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  20. "Heritage Resources and Landmark Alteration Inventory" (PDF). City of Sunnyvale Heritage Preservation Commission. Retrieved 2012-10-07.
  21. 1 2 Kate Bronfenbrenner, "California Farmworkers' Strikes of 1933", pages 79-83 in Labor conflict in the United States: An encyclopedia, edited by R. L. Filippelli, Garland Publishing, Inc. (1990) ISBN   082407968X
  22. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp.  53–64. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  23. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp.  48–80. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  24. "Northrop Grumman Marine Systems Celebrates 100 Years in Operation in Sunnyvale, California". Irconnect.com. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  25. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp.  119–22. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  26. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp.  81–146. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  27. 1 2 O'Brien, Shaun (2012-04-19). "Welcome to the new and expanded Silicon Valley". The Mercury News. Retrieved 2018-04-10.
  28. Glenda Matthews (November 20, 2002). Silicon Valley, Women, and the California Dream: Gender, Class, and Opportunity in the Twentieth Century (trade paperback) (1 ed.). Stanford, California: Stanford University Press. pp.  95–102. ISBN   978-0804747967 . Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  29. George Packer (May 27, 2013). "Change the World Silicon Valley transfers its slogans—and its money—to the realm of politics". The New Yorker. Retrieved July 30, 2015. In wealthy districts, the public schools have essentially been privatized; they insulate themselves from shortfalls in state funding with money raised by foundations they have set up for themselves.
  30. "Early History". Santa Clara County: California's Historic Silicon Valley. National Park Service . Retrieved 2008-01-18.
  31. "New Almaden Mine CERCLA Site". California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Retrieved June 17, 2016. LOCATION: Guadalupe River and South San Francisco Bay, Santa Clara County
  32. "New Almaden Quicksilver County Park Association Homepage". Newalmaden.org. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  33. "Google Image Result". Images.google.com. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  34. "San Jose, CA Typical Weather". Accuweather . Retrieved 2 March 2009.
  35. "Vacation Planner". Weather Channel. Retrieved 2009-05-22.

Further reading