Southern Border Region (California)

Last updated
Economic regions of California - Southern Border Region in purple California economic regions map (labeled and colored).svg
Economic regions of California - Southern Border Region in purple

The Southern Border Region is one of nine such geopolitical designations in the State of California, United States, used for economic analysis. The region is defined to include San Diego County and Imperial County, each of which borders Mexico. [1] [2] [3] Its largest city is San Diego.

Contents

The Southern Border Region is adjacent to the Southern California Region, which consists of five counties (Orange, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside, and Ventura). [4] These regions were created in about 1998, when the California Regional Economies Project identified 9 regional economies. The California Economic Strategy Panel uses employment and wage information reported by employers for public policy-making, planning, and program administration. [5] As an example of information reported by the panel, according to the 2009 report, the gross domestic product of the region had grown 68.5% in five years. [1] Other agencies such as the California Public Utilities Commission also provide reports for the region. [6] [7]

See also

Related Research Articles

California State in the Western United States

California is a state in the Western United States. It is bordered by Nevada to the east, Arizona to the southeast, the Pacific Ocean to the west, Oregon to the north, and the Mexican state of Baja California to the south. With over 39.5 million residents across a total area of approximately 163,696 square miles (423,970 km2), it is the most populous and the third-largest U.S. state by area. It is also the most populated subnational entity in North America and the 34th most populous in the world. The Greater Los Angeles area and the San Francisco Bay Area are the nation's second and fifth most populous urban regions respectively, with the former having more than 18.7 million residents and the latter having over 9.6 million. Sacramento is the state's capital, while Los Angeles is the most populous city in the state and the second most populous city in the country. Los Angeles County is the country's most populous, while San Bernardino County is the largest county by area in the country. San Francisco, which is both a city and county, is the second most densely populated major city in the country and the fifth most densely populated county in the country, behind four of New York City's five boroughs.

San Diego City in Southern California, United States

San Diego is a city in the U.S. state of California on the coast of the Pacific Ocean and immediately adjacent to the Mexican border. With an estimated population of 1,423,851 as of July 1, 2019, San Diego is the eighth most populous city in the United States and second most populous in California. The city is the county seat of San Diego County, the fifth most populous county in the United States, with 3,338,330 estimated residents as of 2019. The city is known for its mild year-round climate, natural deep-water harbor, extensive beaches and parks, long association with the United States Navy and Marine Corps, and recent emergence as a healthcare and biotechnology development center.

Southern California American geographic and cultural region

Southern California is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. It includes the Los Angeles metropolitan area, the second most populous urban agglomeration in the United States. The region generally contains ten of California's 58 counties: Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties. The Colorado Desert and the Colorado River are located on southern California's eastern border with Arizona, and San Bernardino County shares a border with Nevada to the northeast. Southern California's southern border with Baja California is part of the Mexico–United States border.

Greater Los Angeles Place in California, United States

Greater Los Angeles, with a 2019 population of 18,710,563, is the second-largest urban region area in the United States, encompassing five counties in southern California extending from Ventura County in the west to San Bernardino County and Riverside County in the east, with Los Angeles County in the center and Orange County to the southeast. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Los Angeles–Anaheim–Riverside combined statistical area covers 33,954 square miles (87,940 km2), making it the largest metropolitan region in the United States by land area. However, more than half of this area lies in the sparsely populated eastern areas of Riverside and San Bernardino counties. In addition to being the nexus of the world's largest entertainment industry, Greater Los Angeles is also a global center of business, international trade, education, media, fashion, tourism, science and technology, sports, and transportation. It is the 2nd largest metropolitan area by nominal GDP in the world with an economy exceeding $1 trillion in output.

Sun Belt Region of the southern United States

The Sun Belt is a region of the United States generally considered to stretch across the Southeast and Southwest. Another rough definition of the region is the area south of the 36th parallel. Several climates can be found in the region — desert/semi-desert, Mediterranean (California), humid subtropical subtropical highland and tropical.

Southern California Edison Electrical utility in Southern California, United States

Southern California Edison, the largest subsidiary of Edison International, is the primary electricity supply company for much of Southern California. It provides 15 million people with electricity across a service territory of approximately 50,000 square miles. However, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E), Imperial Irrigation District, and some smaller municipal utilities serve substantial portions of the southern California territory. The northern part of the state is generally served by the Pacific Gas & Electric Company of San Francisco. Other investor-owned utilities (IOUs) in California include SDG&E, PacifiCorp, Bear Valley Electric, and Liberty Utilities.

California's major urban areas normally are thought of as two large megalopolises: one in Northern California and one in Southern California, separated from each other by approximately 382 miles or 615 km, with sparsely inhabited (relatively) Central Coast, Central Valley, and Transverse Ranges in between. Other ideas conceive of a single megalopolis encompassing both North and South, or a division of Coastal California vs. Inland California. These regional concepts are usually based on geographic, cultural, political, and environmental differences, rather than transportation and infrastructure connectivity and boundaries.

California Environmental Quality Act A California law requiring environmental concerns be considered during land development

The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) is a California statute passed in 1970 and signed in to law by then-Governor Ronald Reagan, shortly after the United States federal government passed the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to institute a statewide policy of environmental protection. CEQA does not directly regulate land uses, but instead requires state and local agencies within California to follow a protocol of analysis and public disclosure of environmental impacts of proposed projects and, in a departure from NEPA, adopt all feasible measures to mitigate those impacts. CEQA makes environmental protection a mandatory part of every California state and local (public) agency's decision making process. It has also become the basis for numerous lawsuits concerning public and private projects.

Transportation in California Overview of the transport in the State of California

California's transportation system is complex and dynamic. Although known for its car culture and extensive network of freeways and roads, the state also has a vast array of rail, sea, and air transport. Several subway, light rail, and commuter rail networks are found in many of the state's largest population centers. In addition, with the state's location on the West Coast of the United States, several important ports in California handle freight shipments from the Pacific Rim and beyond. A number of airports are also spread out across the state, ranging from small general aviation airports to large international hubs like Los Angeles International Airport and San Francisco International Airport.

The metropolitan areas of Mexico have been traditionally defined as the group of municipalities that heavily interact with each other, usually around a core city. The phenomenon of metropolization in Mexico is relatively recent, starting in the 1940's, and due to the accelerated level of urbanization in the country, the definition of a metropolitan area is reviewed periodically by the Mexican population and census authorities.

San Diego–Tijuana International transborder agglomeration in Southern California and northwestern Baja California

San Diego–Tijuana is an international transborder agglomeration, straddling the border of the adjacent North American coastal cities of San Diego, California, United States and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. The 2012 population of the region was 4,922,723, making it the largest bi-national conurbation shared between the United States and Mexico, the second-largest shared between the US and another country. In its entirety, the region consists of San Diego County in the United States and the municipalities of Tijuana, Rosarito Beach, and Tecate in Mexico. It is the third most populous region in the California–Baja California region, smaller only than the metropolitan areas of Greater Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Issues that affect water supply and sanitation in the United States include water scarcity, pollution, a backlog of investment, concerns about the affordability of water for the poorest, and a rapidly retiring workforce. Increased variability and intensity of rainfall as a result of climate change is expected to produce both more severe droughts and flooding, with potentially serious consequences for water supply and for pollution from combined sewer overflows. Droughts are likely to particularly affect the 66 percent of Americans whose communities depend on surface water. As for drinking water quality, there are concerns about disinfection by-products, lead, perchlorates, PFAS and pharmaceutical substances, but generally drinking water quality in the U.S. is good.

Career Pathways is a workforce development strategy used in the United States to support workers’ transitions from education into and through the workforce. This strategy has been adopted at the federal, state and local levels in order to increase education, training and learning opportunities for America’s current and emerging workforce.

Megaregions of the United States are clustered networks of American cities, which are currently estimated to contain a total population exceeding 237 million.

San Diego County, California County in California, United States

San Diego County, officially the County of San Diego, is a county in the southwestern corner of the state of California, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 3,095,313, making it California's second-most populous county and the fifth-most populous in the United States. Its county seat is San Diego, the second-most populous city in California and the eighth-most populous city in the United States. It is the southwesternmost county in the 48 contiguous United States, and is a border county.

The Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act of 2008, also known as Senate Bill 375 or SB 375, is a State of California law targeting greenhouse gas emissions from passenger vehicles. The Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions. Passenger vehicles are the single largest source of greenhouse gas emissions statewide, accounting for 30% of total emissions. SB 375 therefore provides key support to achieve the goals of AB 32.

Transportation in San Diego–Tijuana occurs by various means. Though, in the four cities of San Diego, Tijuana, Tecate, and Rosarito Beach, the automobile serves as most important means of transportation. The international metropolitan region maintains an intricate highway infrastructure. As a large metropolitan area in Western North America, many roadways, including Interstates, State Routes, and Mexican Federal Highways, hold a terminus in the area. These roads have grown accustomed to support the masses of the commuting populace within the international region and are constantly being expanded and/or renovated. Transportation is a crucial issue in the metropolitan area. The streets and highways of the region affect environmental health and have influence over the degree of regional connectivity. Binational discussions about coordinating public transportation across the border are currently underway. San Diego–Tijuana is the site of two major international airports and numerous regional airports. It is also the site of the Port of San Diego and miles from the nearby Port of Ensenada.

The California Labor and Workforce Development Agency (LWDA) is a cabinet-level California state agency that coordinates workforce programs by overseeing seven major departments dealing with benefit administration, enforcement of California labor laws, appellate functions related to employee benefits, workforce development, tax collection, economic development activities. It was conceived by Governor Gray Davis and was formally created by S.B. 1236 in 2002.

Inland Empire Metropolitan area in California, United States

The Inland Empire (IE) is a metropolitan area and region in Southern California, inland of and adjacent to Los Angeles. It includes the cities of western Riverside County and southwestern San Bernardino County, and is sometimes considered to include the desert communities of the Coachella and Victor Valleys, respectively on the other sides of the San Gorgonio Pass and San Bernardino Mountains from the Santa Ana River watershed that forms the bulk of the Inland Empire; a much broader definition includes all of Riverside and San Bernardino counties. The combined land area of the counties of the Inland Empire is larger than ten U.S. states – West Virginia, Maryland, Hawaii, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware and Rhode Island – and is slightly smaller than the combined area of the last five.

References

  1. 1 2 "2009 Southern Border region economic profile.pdf" (PDF). Labor Department of the State of California. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  2. David Carroll; Jean Ross (2003). Boom, bust, and beyond: the state of working California. California Budget Project. Retrieved 2011-06-10.
  3. "AB32 Policy Brief v.2" (PDF). UC Berkeley center for labor research and education. Policy Brief. February 2009. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  4. "California economic base report: Southern California region" (PDF). Labor Department of the State of California. December 2006. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  5. California Economic Strategy Panel (December 2006). "California economic base report: Southern Border region" (PDF). California Labor and Workforce Development Agency. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-10-01. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  6. "California: Southern Border region. Wireline and Fixed Wireless Broadband Availability" (PDF). California Public Utilities Commission. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  7. Center for the Health Professions; Renae Waneka, MPH; Joanne Spetz, PhD (March 31, 2010). "California Board of Registered Nursing. 2008-2009 Annual School Report. Data Summary and Historical Trend Analysis. A Presentation of Pre-Licensure Nursing Education Programs in California. Southern Border" (PDF). San Francisco: Department of Consumer Affairs. Board of Registered Nurses. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 21, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-09.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)

Bibliography