Metropolitan statistical area

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In the United States, a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) is a geographical region with a relatively high population density at its core and close economic ties throughout the area. Such regions are neither legally incorporated as a city or town would be, nor are they legal administrative divisions like counties or separate entities such as states; because of this, the precise definition of any given metropolitan area can vary with the source. A typical metropolitan area is centered on a single large city that wields substantial influence over the region (e.g.,  New York City or Philadelphia). However, some metropolitan areas contain more than one large city with no single municipality holding a substantially dominant position (e.g.,  Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex, Norfolk-Virginia Beach (Hampton Roads), Riverside–San Bernardino (Inland Empire) or Minneapolis–Saint Paul (Twin Cities)). MSAs are defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and used by the Census Bureau and other federal government agencies for statistical purposes. [1]

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

An incorporated town is a town that is a municipal corporation.

Administrative division A territorial entity for administration purposes

An administrative division, unit, entity, area or region, also referred to as a subnational entity, statoid, constituent unit, or country subdivision, is a portion of a country or other region delineated for the purpose of administration. Administrative divisions are granted a certain degree of autonomy and are usually required to manage themselves through their own local governments. Countries are divided up into these smaller units to make managing their land and the affairs of their people easier. A country may be divided into provinces, which, in turn, may be divided in whole or in part into municipalities.

Contents

Map

An enlargeable map of the 955 core based statistical areas (CBSAs) of the United States and Puerto Rico, Feb 2013. The 374 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) are shown in medium green. Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas (CBSAs) of the United States and Puerto Rico, Feb 2013.gif
An enlargeable map of the 955 core based statistical areas (CBSAs) of the United States and Puerto Rico, Feb 2013. The 374 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) are shown in medium green.

Definitions

U.S. Census statistics for metropolitan areas are reported according to the following definitions.

The U.S. Office of Management and Budget defines a set of core based statistical areas (CBSAs) throughout the country. CBSAs are delineated on the basis of a central urban area or urban cluster in other words: a contiguous area of relatively high population density. CBSAs are composed of counties and county equivalents. [2] The counties containing the core urban area are known as the central counties of the CBSA. A central county is a county in which 50% of its population lives in urban areas of at least 10,000 in population, or where a population of 5,000 are located in a single urban area of at least 10,000 in population where that urban area is split between more than one county. [3] Additional surrounding counties, known as outlying counties, can be included in the CBSA if these counties have strong social and economic ties to the central counties as measured by commuting and employment. Outlying counties are included in the CBSA if the employment interchange measure (total of in- and out-commuting) is 25% or more, although these numbers are estimates and exceptions are made. Some areas within these outlying counties may be rural in nature. All counties in a CBSA must be contiguous, and a county can only be included within one CBSA. [3] In New England, towns have precedence over counties, so statistically similar areas are defined in terms of town-based units known as New England city and town areas (NECTAs).

United States urban area

Urban areas in the United States are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as contiguous census block groups with a population density of at least 1,000/sq mi (390/km2) with any census block groups around this core having a density of at least 500/sq mi (190/km2). Urban areas are delineated without regard to political boundaries. The census has two distinct categories of urban areas. Urbanized Areas have populations of greater than 50,000, while Urban Clusters have populations of less than 50,000 but more than 2,500. An urbanized area may serve as the core of a metropolitan statistical area, while an urban cluster may be the core of a micropolitan statistical area.

Commuting periodically recurring travel between ones place of residence and place of work, or study

Commuting is periodically recurring travel between one's place of residence and place of work, or study, and in doing so exceed the boundary of their residential community. It sometimes refers to any regular or often repeated traveling between locations, even when not work-related. A distinction is also often made between commuters who commute daily or weekly between their residence to work place, often being suburbs to cities, and are therefore considered respectively local or long-distance commuters.

Rural area geographic area that is located outside towns and cities

In general, a rural area or countryside is a geographic area that is located outside towns and cities. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines the word rural as encompassing "...all population, housing, and territory not included within an urban area. Whatever is not urban is considered rural."

Adjacent CBSAs are merged into a single CBSA when the central county or counties of one CBSA qualify as an outlying county or counties to the other CBSAs. [3] One or more CBSAs may be grouped together to form a larger statistical entity known as a combined statistical area (CSA) when the employment interchange measure reaches 15% or more.

Combined statistical area (CSA) is a United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) term for a combination of adjacent metropolitan (MSA) and micropolitan statistical areas (µSA) in the United States and Puerto Rico that can demonstrate economic or social linkage. The OMB defines a CSA as consisting of various combinations of adjacent metropolitan and micropolitan areas with economic ties measured by commuting patterns. These areas that combine retain their own designations as metropolitan or micropolitan statistical areas within the larger combined statistical area.

As well as MSAs, CBSAs are also subdivided into micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs) for CBSAs built around an urban cluster of at least 10,000 in population but less than 50,000 in population. [3] Previous terms that are no longer used include standard metropolitan statistical area (SMSA) and primary metropolitan statistical area (PMSA). [4]

Micropolitan statistical area statistical area of the United States

United States micropolitan statistical areas, as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), are labor market areas in the United States centered on an urban cluster with a population of at least 10,000 but fewer than 50,000 people. The micropolitan area designation was created in 2003. Like the better-known Metropolitan Statistical Areas, a micropolitan area is a geographic entity used for statistical purposes based on counties and county equivalents. The OMB has identified 536 micropolitan areas in the United States.

See also

Outline of the United States Overview of and topical guide to the United States

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the United States of America:

Index of United States-related articles Wikimedia list article

The following is an alphabetical list of articles related to the United States of America.

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

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The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

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The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

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The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Arizona census statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Alabama statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Georgia statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Virginia statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Missouri statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Maine statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Minnesota statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

New Mexico statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

North Carolina statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

South Carolina statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Vermont statistical areas Wikimedia list article

The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs), the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs), and the combined statistical areas (CSAs) currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

The United States federal government defines and delineates the nation's metropolitan areas for statistical purposes, using a set of standard statistical area definitions. As of 2013, the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defined and delineated 388 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and 541 micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs) in the United States and Puerto Rico. Many of these 929 MSAs and μSAs are, in turn, components of larger combined statistical areas (CSAs) consisting of adjacent MSAs and μSAs that are linked by commuting ties; as of 2013, 524 metropolitan and micropolitan areas are components of the 169 defined CSAs.

References

  1. Nussle, Jim (Nov 20, 2008). "Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses" (PDF). Office of Management and Budget. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-11-04.
  2. Census Geographic Glossary, U.S. Census Bureau
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Office of Management & Budget, 2010 Standards for Delineating Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas; Notice" (PDF). U.S. Government Publishing Office. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  4. "Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 16 February 2010.