Pima County, Arizona

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Pima County, Arizona
Pima County Courthouse 10.JPG
Pima County, Arizona seal.png
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Pima County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of USA AZ.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
32°03′55″N111°49′15″W / 32.06528°N 111.82083°W / 32.06528; -111.82083 Coordinates: 32°03′55″N111°49′15″W / 32.06528°N 111.82083°W / 32.06528; -111.82083
FoundedNovember 9, 1864
Named for Pima people
Seat Tucson
Largest cityTucson
Area
  Total9,189 sq mi (23,799 km2)
  Land9,187 sq mi (23,794 km2)
  Water2.1 sq mi (5 km2), 0.02%
Population (est.)
  (2018)1,039,073
  Density111/sq mi (43/km2)
Congressional districts 1st, 2nd, 3rd
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7
Website www.pima.gov
Pima County Fair, 2007 Pima County Fair.jpg
Pima County Fair, 2007

Pima County /ˈpmə/ is a county in the south central region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 980,263, [1] making it Arizona's second-most populous county. The county seat is Tucson, [2] where nearly all of the population is centered. The county is named after the Pima Native Americans who are indigenous to this area.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

Contents

Pima County includes the Tucson, Arizona Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Pima County contains parts of the Tohono O'odham Nation, as well as all of the San Xavier Indian Reservation, the Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ironwood Forest National Monument and Saguaro National Park.

The San Xavier Indian Reservation is an Indian reservation of the Tohono O’odham Nation located near Tucson, Arizona, in the Sonoran Desert.The San Xavier Reservation lies in the southwestern part of the Tucson metropolitan area and consists of 111.543 sq mi (288.895 km²) of land area, about 2.5 percent of the Tohono O’odham Nation. It had a 2000 census resident population of 2,053 persons, or 19 percent of the Tohono O’odham population.

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument national monument in the United States

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is a U.S. National Monument and UNESCO biosphere reserve located in extreme southern Arizona that shares a border with the Mexican state of Sonora. The park is the only place in the United States where the organ pipe cactus grows wild. Along with organ pipe, many other types of cacti and other desert flora native to the Yuma Desert section of the Sonoran Desert region grow in the park. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is 517 sq mi (1,340 km2) in size. In 1976 the monument was declared a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO, and in 1977 95% of Organ Pipe Cactus was declared a wilderness area.

Ironwood Forest National Monument national monument in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona

Ironwood Forest National Monument is located in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. Created by Bill Clinton by Presidential Proclamation 7320 on June 9, 2000, the monument is managed by the Bureau of Land Management, an agency within the United States Department of the Interior. The monument covers 188,619 acres (76,331 ha), of which 59,922 acres (24,250 ha) are non-federal and include private land holdings and Arizona State School Trust lands.

The vast majority of the county population lies in and around the city of Tucson (2017 city population: 535,677), filling much of the eastern part of the county with urban development. Tucson, Arizona's second largest city, is a major commercial and academic center. Other urban areas include the Tucson suburbs of Marana (population 44,792), Oro Valley (population 44,350), Sahuarita (population 29,318), and South Tucson (population 5,643), a large ring of unincorporated urban development, and the growing satellite town Green Valley. The rest of the county is sparsely populated; the largest towns are Sells, the capital of the Tohono O'odham Nation, and Ajo in the county's far western region.

Tucson, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Tucson is a city and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, and home to the University of Arizona. The 2010 United States Census put the population at 520,116, while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263. The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second-largest populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border. Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

Marana, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Marana is a town in Pima County, Arizona, located northwest of Tucson, with a small portion in Pinal County. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 34,961. From 1990 to 2000, Marana was the fourth fastest-growing place among all cities and towns in Arizona of any size.

Oro Valley, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Oro Valley, incorporated in 1974, is a suburban town located 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Tucson, Arizona, United States in Pima County. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 41,011, an increase from 29,700 in 2000 census. Dubbed the "Upscale Tech Mecca" of Southern Arizona by the Arizona Daily Star newspaper, Oro Valley is home to over 10 high tech firms and has a median household income nearly 50% higher than the U.S. median. The town is located approximately 110 miles (180 km) southeast of the state capital of Phoenix.

History

Pima County, one of the four original counties in Arizona, was created by the 1st Arizona Territorial Legislature with land acquired through the Gadsden Purchase from Mexico in 1853. The original county consisted of all of Arizona Territory east of longitude 113° 20' and south of the Gila River. [3] Soon thereafter, the counties of Cochise, Graham and Santa Cruz were carved from the original Pima County. [4]

The 1st Arizona Territorial Legislative Assembly was a session of the Arizona Territorial Legislature which began on September 26, 1864, in Prescott, Arizona, and ran for forty-three days. The session was responsible for enacting Arizona's first legal code, creation of the territory's first four counties, and authorizing a volunteer militia to fight hostile Indians.

Gadsden Purchase

The Gadsden Purchase, known in Mexico as Spanish: Venta de La Mesilla, is a 29,670-square-mile (76,800 km2) region of present-day southern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico that the United States acquired from Mexico by the Treaty of Mesilla, which took effect on June 8, 1854. The purchase included lands south of the Gila River and west of the Rio Grande which the U.S. needed to build a transcontinental railroad along a deep southern route, which the Southern Pacific Railroad later completed in 1881–1883. The purchase also aimed to resolve other border issues.

Mexico Country in the southern portion of North America

Mexico, officially the United Mexican States, is a country in the southern portion of North America. It is bordered to the north by the United States; to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean; to the southeast by Guatemala, Belize, and the Caribbean Sea; and to the east by the Gulf of Mexico. Covering almost 2,000,000 square kilometres (770,000 sq mi), the nation is the fifth largest country in the Americas by total area and the 13th largest independent state in the world. With an estimated population of over 120 million people, the country is the tenth most populous state and the most populous Spanish-speaking state in the world, while being the second most populous nation in Latin America after Brazil. Mexico is a federation comprising 31 states and Mexico City, a special federal entity that is also the capital city and its most populous city. Other metropolises in the state include Guadalajara, Monterrey, Puebla, Toluca, Tijuana and León.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 9,189 square miles (23,800 km2), of which 9,187 square miles (23,790 km2) is land and 2.1 square miles (5.4 km2) (0.02%) is water. [5]

United States Census Bureau Bureau of the United States responsible for the census and related statistics

The United States Census Bureau is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce and its director is appointed by the President of the United States.

Topographic features

Major highways

Adjacent counties and municipalities

National protected areas

Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan

The Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan (SDCP) is Pima County’s plan for desert conservation.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 5,716
1880 17,006197.5%
1890 12,673−25.5%
1900 14,68915.9%
1910 22,81855.3%
1920 34,68052.0%
1930 55,67660.5%
1940 72,83830.8%
1950 141,21693.9%
1960 265,66088.1%
1970 351,66732.4%
1980 531,44351.1%
1990 666,88025.5%
2000 843,74626.5%
2010 980,26316.2%
Est. 20181,039,073 [6] 6.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1790–1960 [8] 1900–1990 [9]
1990–2000 [10] 2010–2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 843,746 people, 332,350 households, and 212,039 families residing in the county. The population density was 92 people per square mile (35/km²). There were 366,737 housing units at an average density of 40 per square mile (15/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 75.07% White, 3.03% Black or African American, 3.22% Native American, 2.04% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 13.30% from other races, and 3.21% from two or more races. 29.34% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 22.80% reported speaking Spanish at home. [11]

There were 332,350 households out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.70% were married couples living together, 11.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.20% were non-families. 28.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.60% under the age of 18, 10.90% from 18 to 24, 28.40% from 25 to 44, 21.90% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $36,758, and the median income for a family was $44,446. Males had a median income of $32,156 versus $24,959 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,785. About 10.50% of families and 14.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.40% of those under age 18 and 8.20% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 980,263 people, 388,660 households, and 243,167 families residing in the county. [12] The population density was 106.7 inhabitants per square mile (41.2/km2). There were 440,909 housing units at an average density of 48.0 per square mile (18.5/km2). [13] The racial makeup of the county was 74.3% white, 3.5% black or African American, 3.3% American Indian, 2.6% Asian, 0.2% Pacific islander, 12.3% from other races, and 3.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 34.6% of the population. [12]

The largest ancestry groups were: [14]

  • 30.8% Mexican
  • 16.2% German
  • 10.6% Irish
  • 9.9% English
  • 4.5% Italian
  • 3.1% French
  • 2.8% American
  • 2.7% Polish
  • 2.4% Scottish
  • 1.8% Scotch-Irish
  • 1.7% Norwegian
  • 1.6% Dutch
  • 1.6% Swedish
  • 1.1% Russian

Of the 388,660 households, 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.5% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.4% were non-families, and 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.06. The median age was 37.7 years. [12]

The median income for a household in the county was $45,521 and the median income for a family was $57,377. Males had a median income of $42,313 versus $33,487 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,093. About 11.2% of families and 16.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.6% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over. [15]

Metropolitan Statistical Area

The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated Pima County as the Tucson, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area. [16] The United States Census Bureau ranked the Tucson, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area as the 53rd most populous metropolitan statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012. [17]

The Office of Management and Budget has further designated the Tucson, AZ Metropolitan Statistical Area as a component of the more extensive Tucson-Nogales, AZ Combined Statistical Area, [16] the 53rd most populous combined statistical area and the 59th most populous primary statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012. [17] [18]

Government, policing, and politics

Pima County is governed by a five-member Board of Supervisors who set ordinances and run services for the areas that do not fall within any city or town jurisdiction.

Board of Supervisors and elected positions

The Pima County Board of Supervisors is responsible for steering public policy in the region. The five-member board provides direction to the County Administrator and the county’s various departments as they work to ensure safe communities, nurture economic development, sustainably manage natural resources and protect public health. In addition to overseeing the delivery of a host of municipal services, from roads to parks and libraries and law enforcement, board members also are responsible for approving the county budget. Elected to four-year terms, board members also set the amount of taxes to be levied.

PartyDistrictNameFirst electedArea(s) representedOfficial Website
 RepublicanDistrict 1Ally Miller2012 Oro Valley, Marana, Catalina Foothills District 1
 DemocraticDistrict 2Ramon ValadezAppointed 2003 Tucson, Sahuarita, South Tucson District 2
 DemocraticDistrict 3Sharon Bronson1996 Tucson, Marana, Three Points, Sahuarita District 3
 RepublicanDistrict 4Steve Christy2016 Tucson, Vail, Summerhaven, Green Valley District 4
 DemocraticDistrict 5Richard EliasAppointed 2002 Tucson, Sahuarita, Green Valley District 5

[19]

Along with the Board of Supervisors the Arizona State Constitution allows for 7 other county elected officials.

PartyOfficeNameFirst electedReferences
 DemocraticAssessorBill Staples2004 [20]
 DemocraticCounty AttorneyBarbara LaWall1996 [21]
 DemocraticCounty RecorderF. Ann Rodriguez1992 [22]
 DemocraticCounty School SuperintendentDustin Williams2016 [23]
 RepublicanSheriffMark D. Napier2016 [24]
 RepublicanTreasurerBeth Ford2000 [25]
 RepublicanClerk of Superior CourtToni Hellon2013 [26]

Pima County Sheriff

The Pima county sheriff's department provides court protection, administers the county jail, provides coroner service, and patrols the unincorporated parts of Pima County. It is the seventh largest sheriff's department in the nation. [27] Incorporated towns within the county with municipal police departments are Tucson, Marana, Oro Valley, and Sahuarita.

Politics

Presidential elections results
Pima County vote
by party in presidential elections
[28]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 39.7% 167,42853.3%224,6617.0% 29,551
2012 45.6% 174,77952.5%201,2511.9% 7,143
2008 46.2% 182,40652.2%206,2541.6% 6,180
2004 46.6% 171,10952.6%193,1280.9% 3,255
2000 43.3% 124,57951.3%147,6885.4% 15,373
1996 39.4% 104,12152.2%137,9838.5% 22,448
1992 34.5% 97,03645.7%128,56919.9% 55,879
1988 50.3%117,89948.5% 113,8241.2% 2,750
1984 56.9%123,83042.1% 91,5851.0% 2,197
1980 49.8%93,05534.4% 64,41815.8% 29,584
1976 49.8%77,26445.9% 71,2144.3% 6,583
1972 45.4%73,15434.9% 56,22319.7% 31,733
1968 50.6%49,47940.7% 39,7868.7% 8,501
1964 46.4% 46,95553.4%54,1200.2% 203
1960 52.4%46,73447.3% 42,1710.3% 239
1956 62.5%39,29837.4% 23,5360.1% 51
1952 60.2%32,11339.8% 21,237
1948 47.6% 16,96849.7%17,6922.7% 965
1944 45.4% 10,85054.4%13,0060.2% 57
1940 40.1% 9,44559.6%14,0350.4% 82
1936 32.7% 6,07965.9%12,2491.4% 262
1932 34.7% 6,15262.4%11,0612.9% 514
1928 56.9%6,63542.7% 4,9760.4% 42
1924 42.2%3,55930.7% 2,59427.1% 2,286
1920 58.0%3,39242.0% 2,455
1916 53.2%2,61642.2% 2,0794.6% 227
1912 19.6% 35338.4% 69342.0%758

Communities

Map of the incorporated and unincorporated cities and towns in Pima County. Also shown are the borders for the Indian Reservations in the county. Pima County Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Map of the incorporated and unincorporated cities and towns in Pima County. Also shown are the borders for the Indian Reservations in the county.
Astronaut photo of the open-pit copper mines adjacent to Green Valley, 2010. Note that north is to the left. Pima Co. Copper mines.jpg
Astronaut photo of the open-pit copper mines adjacent to Green Valley, 2010. Note that north is to the left.

Cities

Towns

Ghost Towns in Pima County

Census-designated places

Indian communities

Other communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Pima County. [29] [30]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1Tucson 520,116City1775
2 Casas Adobes 66,795 CDP
3 Catalina Foothills 50,796CDP
4 Oro Valley 41,011Town1974
5 Marana 34,961Town1977
6 Drexel Heights 27,749CDP
7 Sahuarita 25,259Town1994
8 Green Valley 21,391CDP
9 Tanque Verde 16,901CDP
10 Flowing Wells 16,419CDP
11 Tucson Estates 12,192CDP
12 Vail 10,208CDP
13 Picture Rocks 9,563CDP
14 Valencia West 9,355CDP
15 Catalina 7,569CDP
16 Avra Valley 6,050CDP
17 Corona de Tucson 5,675CDP
18 South Tucson 5,652City1940
19 Three Points 5,581CDP
20 Summit 5,372CDP
21 Rincon Valley 5,139CDP
22 Ajo 3,304CDP
23 Sells 2,495CDP
24Arivaca Junction1,090CDP
25 Littletown 873CDP
26 Arivaca 695CDP
27Pimaco Two682CDP
28 Santa Rosa 628CDP
29Elephant Head612CDP
30 Pisinemo 321CDP
31 Topawa 299CDP
32Nelson259CDP
33San Miguel197CDP
34Gu Oidak188CDP
35 Why 167CDP
36Ali Chuk161CDP
37Maish Vaya158CDP
38Anegam151CDP
39 Cowlic 135CDP
40Ali Chukson132CDP
41Wahak Hotrontk114CDP
42South Komelik111CDP
43 Rillito 97CDP
44Haivana Nakya96CDP
45Chiawuli Tak78CDP
46Ali Molina71CDP
47Charco52CDP
48 Ventana 49CDP
49Ko Vaya46CDP
50 Summerhaven 40CDP
51Nolic37CDP
52Ak Chin30CDP
53Comobabi8CDP
54Willow Canyon1CDP

Tourist attractions

Yearly Events

Locations of Interest

Recreation Attractions

See all recreational items including arts and culture, classes, community centers, outdoor activities, parks and pools, special events, stadiums and hiking/trail maps. Learn more...

See also

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Catalina Foothills, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

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Corona de Tucson, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Corona de Tucson is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 5,675 at the 2010 census, an increase of 598% from the 2000 population of 813.

East Sahuarita, Arizona former CDP in Arizona, United States

East Sahuarita was a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,419 at the 2000 census.

Flowing Wells, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Flowing Wells is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. It is a suburb of Tucson. The population was 16,419 at the 2010 census.

Green Valley, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Green Valley is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 23,765 at the 2010 census.

Littletown, Arizona Former CDP in Arizona, United States

Littletown was a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,010 at the 2000 census. The area was annexed into Tucson in 2017.

Sahuarita, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Sahuarita is a town in Pima County, Arizona, United States. Sahuarita is located south of the Tohono O'odham Nation and abuts the north end of Green Valley, 15 miles (24 km) south of Tucson. The population was 25,259 at the 2010 census.

Tanque Verde, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Tanque Verde is a suburban census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States, northeast of Tucson. The population was 16,195 at the 2000 census.

Three Points, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Three Points is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 5,581 at the 2010 census.

Tucson Estates, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Tucson Estates is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. The population was 9,755 at the 2000 census.

Vail, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Vail is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pima County, Arizona, United States. It is twenty-four miles southeast of Tucson. The population was 10,208 at the 2010 census, up from 588 in the 2000 census. The area is known for the nearby Colossal Cave, a large cave system, and the Rincon Mountains District of Saguaro National Park, a top tourism spot within Arizona.

Safford, Arizona micropolitan area

The Safford Micropolitan Statistical Area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of one county in eastern Arizona, anchored by the city of Safford.

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  19. "Board of Supervisors - Pima County". Pima.gov. April 16, 2013. Retrieved October 11, 2015.
  20. "Office of The Pima County Assessor". asr.pima.gov. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  21. "Pima County Attorney". pcao.pima.gov. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  22. "Pima County Recorder's Office - F. Ann Rodriguez". recorder.pima.gov. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  23. "Meet the Superintendent - Pima County Schools - Tucson, AZ". schools.pima.gov. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  24. "Pima County Sheriff's Department :: Welcome from Sheriff Napier". editorialmac.com. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  25. "Home". to.pima.gov. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  26. "Home". cosc.pima.gov/. Retrieved 2017-01-23.
  27. Pima County Sheriff wikipedia site
  28. "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections" . Retrieved June 11, 2011.
  29. Center for New Media and Promotions(C2PO). "2010 Census". census.gov.
  30. Geographic Products Branch. "2010 Census Block Maps - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau". census.gov.