Graham County, Arizona

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Graham County, Arizona
GrahamCountyCourthouse.jpg
Graham County Courthouse in Safford
Map of Arizona highlighting Graham County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of USA AZ.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
FoundedMarch 10, 1881
Seat Safford
Largest citySafford
Area
  Total4,641 sq mi (12,020 km2)
  Land4,623 sq mi (11,974 km2)
  Water19 sq mi (49 km2), 0.4%
Population (est.)
  (2018)38,072
  Density8.2/sq mi (3.2/km2)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7
Website www.graham.az.gov
The Large Binocular Telescope on the summit ridge of the Pinaleno Mountains, Graham County. LBT Pinaleno Mountains.40936.JPG
The Large Binocular Telescope on the summit ridge of the Pinaleno Mountains, Graham County.

Graham County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 37,220, [1] making it the third-least populous county in Arizona. The county seat is Safford. [2]

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

Contents

Graham County composes the Safford, Arizona Micropolitan Statistical Area.

The county is home to several organizations including Eastern Arizona College and the Mount Graham International Observatory, which includes one of the world's largest and most powerful telescopes. Graham County is also home to the Arizona Salsa Trail and the annual Salsa Fest. [3]

Eastern Arizona College community college located in Graham County, Arizona

Eastern Arizona College (EAC), is a community college in Graham County, Arizona. The main campus is in Thatcher, with satellite locations in Gila County, and Greenlee County. It is the oldest community college in Arizona and the only community college in Arizona with a marching band.

Mount Graham International Observatory observatory

Mount Graham International Observatory (MGIO) is a division of Steward Observatory, the research arm for the Department of Astronomy at The University of Arizona, in the United States. It is located in southeastern Arizona's Pinaleño Mountains near Mount Graham.

Graham County contains part of the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation.

San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation Indian reservation

The San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, in southeastern Arizona, United States, was established in 1872 as a reservation for the Chiricahua Apache tribe as well as surrounding Yavapai and Apache bands forcibly removed from their original homelands under a strategy devised by General George Crook of using an Apache to catch an Apache. Also known as "Hell's Forty Acres" under United States occupation because of deplorable health and environmental conditions, today's San Carlos Apaches successfully operate a Chamber of Commerce, the Apache Gold Casino, a Language Preservation program, a Culture Center, and a Tribal College.

History

Joseph Knight Rogers, an early settler in the area, and a member of the Arizona Territorial Legislature, is known as the father of Graham County. He introduced the bill in the territorial legislature creating Graham County. [4] Graham County was created from southern Apache County and eastern Pima County on March 10, 1881. [5] Initially, the county seat was located in the city of Safford but was later moved to Solomonville in 1883. This change was undone in 1915, returning the county seat to Safford. [6]

Graham County is named after the mountain by the same name which was named after Lt. Col James Duncan Graham, and was the first Arizona county to break the tradition of naming counties for Native Americans.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,641 square miles (12,020 km2), of which 4,623 square miles (11,970 km2) is land and 19 square miles (49 km2) (0.4%) is water. [7] The county has various mountain ranges including Mount Graham, which is the highest mountain in the Pinaleno Mountains.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Major highways

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1890 5,670
1900 14,162149.8%
1910 23,99969.5%
1920 10,148−57.7%
1930 10,3732.2%
1940 12,11316.8%
1950 12,9857.2%
1960 14,0458.2%
1970 16,57818.0%
1980 22,86237.9%
1990 26,55416.1%
2000 33,48926.1%
2010 37,22011.1%
Est. 201838,072 [8] 2.3%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
1790–1960 [10] 1900–1990 [11]
1990–2000 [12] 2010–2018 [1]
Roper Lake, south of Safford. Roper1-kmf.JPG
Roper Lake, south of Safford.

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 33,489 people, 10,116 households, and 7,617 families residing in the county. The population density was 7 people per square mile (3/km²). There were 11,430 housing units at an average density of 2 per square mile (1/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 67.11% White, 1.87% Black or African American, 14.95% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 13.35% from other races, and 2.14% from two or more races. 27.04% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 16.38% reported speaking Spanish at home, while 6.35% speak a Southern Athabaskan language. [13]

There were 10,116 households out of which 39.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.20% were married couples living together, 13.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.70% were non-families. 20.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.99 and the average family size was 3.47.

In the county, the population was spread out with 30.10% under the age of 18, 12.00% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 18.70% from 45 to 64, and 11.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 112.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 115.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,668, and the median income for a family was $34,417. Males had a median income of $30,524 versus $20,739 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,139. About 17.70% of families and 23.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.20% of those under age 18 and 13.60% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 37,220 people, 11,120 households, and 8,188 families residing in the county. [14] The population density was 8.1 inhabitants per square mile (3.1/km2). There were 12,980 housing units at an average density of 2.8 per square mile (1.1/km2). [15] The racial makeup of the county was 72.1% white, 14.4% American Indian, 1.8% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 8.2% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 30.4% of the population. [14] In terms of ancestry, 16.1% were English, 9.2% were German, 6.9% were Irish, and 4.3% were American. [16]

Of the 11,120 households, 41.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 15.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.4% were non-families, and 21.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.50. The median age was 31.6 years. [14]

The median income for a household in the county was $41,683 and the median income for a family was $48,005. Males had a median income of $41,732 versus $25,990 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,644. About 15.9% of families and 20.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.3% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over. [17]

Politics

In it's early days Graham County was a solidly Democratic county. It voted for the Democratic nominee in every presidential election from 1912 to 1952, being one of only four Western counties outside New Mexico to support James M. Cox in 1920, and one of only five to support John W. Davis in 1924. Since the 1950s, however, Graham has become a reliable Republican county, usually rivaling Mohave and Yavapai as the most Republican in Arizona, and sometimes, as in 2004 and 2000, being the “reddest” of all the state’s counties. No Democratic presidential nominee has carried Graham County since Lyndon B. Johnson – ironically against Arizona native Barry Goldwater – did so in 1964.

Presidential election results
Graham County vote
by party in presidential elections
[18] [19]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 65.3%8,02526.9% 3,3017.8% 955
2012 67.8%8,07630.3% 3,6091.9% 220
2008 69.4%8,37628.9% 3,4871.7% 206
2004 69.7%7,46729.7% 3,1850.6% 68
2000 62.2%6,00734.7% 3,3553.1% 302
1996 45.4%4,22242.4% 3,93812.2% 1,136
1992 43.0%4,16935.0% 3,39122.1% 2,139
1988 59.2%5,12039.4% 3,4071.4% 125
1984 62.4%5,24736.6% 3,0801.1% 89
1980 59.9%4,76535.2% 2,8015.0% 395
1976 52.6%3,65943.8% 3,0503.6% 249
1972 60.2%3,57531.4% 1,8638.5% 505
1968 47.2%2,32735.0% 1,72617.8% 876
1964 48.8% 2,65551.2%2,783
1960 54.4%2,49145.6% 2,0910.0% 1
1956 58.6%2,38441.5% 1,688
1952 49.9% 2,19150.1%2,200
1948 35.7% 1,20963.2%2,1391.1% 38
1944 32.4% 1,15167.4%2,3930.1% 5
1940 26.9% 1,16172.6%3,1300.4% 19
1936 15.5% 68080.9%3,5413.5% 154
1932 19.8% 71879.1%2,8671.1% 40
1928 43.3% 1,23856.5%1,6150.3% 8
1924 33.2% 81351.1%1,25215.8% 386
1920 45.7% 1,06254.3%1,261
1916 22.0% 49770.8%1,5977.2% 163
1912 9.7% 10351.1%54039.2% 414

Communities

Locations of incorporated and unincorporated areas as well as Indian reservations in Graham County. Graham County Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Locations of incorporated and unincorporated areas as well as Indian reservations in Graham County.

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Linarite specimen from the old Grand Reef mine near Klondyke. Linarite-290594.jpg
Linarite specimen from the old Grand Reef mine near Klondyke.

Ghost towns

Indian communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Graham County. [20] [21]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1Safford 9,566City
2 Thatcher 4,865Town
3 Swift Trail Junction 2,935 CDP
4 Pima 2,387Town
5 Bylas 1,962CDP
6 Cactus Flats 1,518CDP
7 Peridot (Partially in Gila County )1,350CDP
8 Central 645CDP
9 San Jose 506CDP
10 Solomon 426CDP
11 Fort Thomas 374CDP
12 Bryce 175CDP

Notable people

See also

Related Research Articles

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San Carlos is a census-designated place (CDP) in Gila County, Arizona, United States. The population was 4,038 at the 2010 census, up from 3,716 at the 2000 census.

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Safford, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Safford is a city in Graham County, Arizona, United States. According to the 2010 Census, the population of the city is 9,566. The city is the county seat of Graham County.

Swift Trail Junction, Arizona Census-designated place in Arizona, United States

Swift Trail Junction is a census-designated place (CDP) in Graham County, Arizona, United States. The population was 2,935 at the 2010 census, up from 2,195 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Safford Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Thatcher, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

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Sacaton, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

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References

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  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-15. Retrieved July 14, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
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  7. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  8. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  9. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  10. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
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  12. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  13. http://www.mla.org/map_data_results&state_id=4&county_id=9&mode=geographic&order=r
  14. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  15. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  16. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  17. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  18. "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections" . Retrieved 2011-06-11.
  19. Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 42-44 ISBN   0405077114
  20. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-21. Retrieved 2013-02-10.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  21. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/maps/block/2010/

Coordinates: 33°00′33″N109°53′07″W / 33.00917°N 109.88528°W / 33.00917; -109.88528