Government of Arizona

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The government of Arizona is the governmental structure of the state of Arizona as established by the Arizona Constitution. The executive is composed of the Governor, several other statewide elected officials, and the Governor's cabinet. The Arizona Legislature consists of the House of Representatives and Senate. The judiciary is composed of the Arizona Supreme Court and lower courts. There is also local government, consisting of counties, municipalities and special districts.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

The Constitution of the State of Arizona is the governing document and framework for the U.S. state of Arizona. The current constitution is the first and only adopted by the state of Arizona.

Arizona House of Representatives Lower house of U.S. state legislature

The Arizona House of Representatives is the lower house of the Arizona Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Arizona. The upper house is the Senate. Its members are elected to two-year terms with a term limit of four consecutive terms. Members of the Republican Party currently hold a narrow majority in the House.

Contents

Executive

The statewide elected officers are:

Doug Ducey American businessman and politician

Douglas Anthony Ducey is an American businessman and politician who is the 23rd governor of Arizona. A Republican, he was sworn in as governor on January 5, 2015. He was the state's treasurer from 2011 to 2015.

Katie Hobbs American politician in Arizona

Kathleen M. Hobbs is an American politician, who is currently the Arizona Secretary of State. A Democrat, she was previously a state senator from Arizona, representing the 24th district, and a state representative.

Secretary of State of Arizona an elected position in the U.S. state of Arizona

The Secretary of State of Arizona is an elected position in the U.S. state of Arizona. Since Arizona does not have a lieutenant governor, the Secretary stands first in the line of succession to the governorship. The Secretary also serves as acting governor whenever the governor is incapacitated or out of state. The Secretary is the keeper of the Seal of Arizona and administers oaths of office. The current secretary is Katie Hobbs.

All elected officials hold a term of four years, and are limited to two consecutive terms (except the office of the State Mine Inspector, which is limited to 4 terms [1] ). Arizona is one of seven states that do not have a specified lieutenant governor, so the Secretary of State is the first in line to succeed the Governor in the event of death, disability, resignation, or removal from office. The line of succession also includes the attorney general, state treasurer and superintendent of public instruction. Elections for statewide officers occur during even numbered, none presidential, years, except that 3 of the corporation commissioners are elected during presidential years.

Cabinet

The state departments and agencies are: [2]

The Arizona State Capitol Executive Tower in Phoenix Arizona State Capitol Executive Tower DSC 2708 ad.JPG
The Arizona State Capitol Executive Tower in Phoenix

Mark Killian is an American politician and the director of the Arizona Department of Agriculture. Killian is a former Republican state representative and speaker of the Arizona House of Representatives.

Arizona Department of Corrections

The Arizona Department of Corrections is statutory responsible for the incarceration of inmates in 10 prisons in the U.S. state of Arizona. As of December 2015, the ADC manages over 42,643 imprisoned inmates and over 5,466 inmates who have been paroled or that are statutorily released. ADC is also in involved in recruitment and training of Correctional Officers at the Correctional Officer Training Academy (COTA). It has its headquarters in Downtown Phoenix.

Arizona Department of Economic Security government agency of the State of Arizona

The Arizona Department of Economic Security (DES) is a government agency of the State of Arizona. DES works with families, community organizations, advocates and state and federal partners to realize our collective vision that every child, adult, and family in Arizona will be safe and economically secure.

Arizona Boards and Commissions Include

Legislature

The State House Chamber of the Arizona State Capitol Building Arizona State House Chamber.jpg
The State House Chamber of the Arizona State Capitol Building

The Arizona Legislature is bicameral and consists of the 60-member Arizona House of Representatives and the 30-member Arizona Senate. Each of the thirty legislative districts has one senator and two representatives. Legislators are elected for two-year terms and are limited to four consecutive terms in a chamber, though there is no limit on the total number of terms.

Arizona Senate part of the Arizona Legislature, the state legislature of the US state of Arizona

The Arizona Senate is part of the Arizona Legislature, the state legislature of the US state of Arizona. The Senate consists of 30 members each representing an average of 219,859 constituents. Members serve two-year terms with term limits that limit Senators to four terms for a total of eight years. Members of the Republican Party are currently the majority in the Senate.

Each Legislature covers a two-year period. The first session following the general election is known as the first regular session, and the session convening in the second year is known as the second regular session. Each regular session begins on the second Monday in January and adjourns sine die (terminates for the year) no later than Saturday of the week in which the 100th day from the beginning of the regular session falls. The President of the Senate and Speaker of the House, by rule, may extend the session up to seven additional days. Thereafter, the session can only be extended by a majority vote of members present of each house.

Judiciary

The Cochise County courthouse in Bisbee Cochise County courthouse, Bisbee, Arizona.jpg
The Cochise County courthouse in Bisbee

The Arizona Supreme Court is the highest court in Arizona. The court currently consists of one chief justice, a vice chief justice, and five (5) associate justices. Justices are appointed by the governor from a list recommended by a bipartisan commission, and are re-elected after the initial two years following their appointment. Subsequent re-elections occur every six years. The supreme court has appellate jurisdiction in death penalty cases, but almost all other appellate cases go through the Arizona Court of Appeals beforehand. The court has original jurisdiction in a few other circumstances, as outlined in the state constitution. The court may also declare laws unconstitutional, but only while seated en banc . The court meets in the Arizona Supreme Court Building at the capitol complex (at the southern end of Wesley Bolin Plaza).

The Arizona Court of Appeals, further divided into two divisions, is the intermediate court in the state. [4] It hears and decides cases in three judge panels. [4] Division One is based in Phoenix, consists of sixteen judges, and has jurisdiction in the Western and Northern regions of the state, along with the greater Phoenix area. Division Two is based in Tucson, consists of six judges, and has jurisdiction over the Southern regions of the state, including the Tucson area. Judges are selected in a method similar to the one used for state supreme court justices.

The Arizona Superior Court is the court of general jurisdiction. [5] The Superior Court also acts as an appellate court for justice and municipal courts. [5]

The Arizona justice courts are nonrecord courts of limited jurisdiction in each county, presided over by a justice of the peace who is elected for a four-year term, that have jurisdiction over civil lawsuits where the amount in dispute is $10,000 or less, landlord and tenant controversies, small claims cases and the full range of civil and criminal traffic offenses, including DUIs, and other types of misdemeanor allegations (e.g. shoplifting, writing bad checks, violating restraining orders). [6] [7]

The Arizona municipal courts, also known as city courts or magistrate courts, are nonrecord courts of limited jurisdiction that have criminal jurisdiction over misdemeanor crimes and petty offenses committed in their city or town and share jurisdiction with justice courts over violations of state law committed within their city or town limits, and hear misdemeanor criminal traffic cases such as driving under the influence of alcohol, hit-and-run and reckless driving where no serious injuries occur, and hear civil traffic cases, violations of city ordinances and codes, and issue orders of protection and injunctions prohibiting harassment, and can also issue search warrants. [6] [8]

Local government

The (Maricopa) County-City Administration Building in Phoenix Maricopa County Courthouse October 6 2013 Phoenix Arizona 2816x2112 Rear.JPG
The (Maricopa) County-City Administration Building in Phoenix

Arizona is divided into political jurisdictions designated as counties, which derive all of their power from the state. Incorporated cities and towns are those that have been granted home rule, possessing a local government in the form of a city or town council.

See also

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References

  1. "Format Document". www.azleg.gov. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  2. "Department and Agency Heads". Office of the Governor of Arizona. Retrieved 21 April 2014.
  3. "Arizona Weights and Measures Department folding, duties moving". azpbs.org. 2 September 2015. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  4. 1 2 "Court of Appeals". Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts . Retrieved 22 June 2014.
  5. 1 2 "Superior Court". Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts . Retrieved 22 June 2014.
  6. 1 2 "AZ Courts". Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts . Retrieved 22 June 2014.
  7. "Justice Courts". Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts . Retrieved 22 June 2014.
  8. "City Courts". Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts . Retrieved 22 June 2014.