Arizona Attorney General

Last updated
Attorney General of Arizona
Seal of the Attorney General of Arizona.jpg
Seal of the Attorney General of Arizona
Mark Brnovich by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Incumbent
Mark Brnovich

since January 5, 2015
Style The Honorable
Residence Phoenix, Arizona
Term length Four years, can succeed self once; eligible again after 4-year respite
Formation1912
DeputyNone
Salary$90,000
Website Arizona Attorney General

The Arizona Attorney General is the chief legal officer of the state of Arizona [1] , in the United States. This state officer is the head of the Arizona Department of Law [2] , more commonly known as the Arizona Attorney General’s Office. The state attorney general is a constitutionally-established officer, elected by the people of the state to a four-year term.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Contents

Headed by the Attorney General of Arizona [1] , the Arizona Attorney General’s Office is the largest law office in the state, with approximately 400 attorneys and 1,000 employees. As of 2019, the Attorney General’s Office is divided into the following divisions: [3] [4]

Qualifications

The Arizona Constitution requires all of the officers in the state's executive department, including the attorney general, to be at least 25 years old, a U.S. citizen for 10 years and an Arizona resident for five years. [5]

Arizona law further requires the attorney general to have been a “practicing attorney before the supreme court of the state” for at least five years before taking office [6] , however the Arizona Supreme Court ruled the law unconstitutional during the appointment process of Jack LaSota in 1977; LaSota had not renewed his state bar membership and was therefore not considered a practicing attorney. [7]

Arizona Supreme Court the highest court in the U.S. state of Arizona

The Arizona Supreme Court is the state supreme court of the U.S. state of Arizona. It consists of a chief justice, a vice chief justice, and five associate justices. Each justice is appointed by the governor of Arizona from a list recommended by a bipartisan commission. Justices stand for retention in an election two years after their appointment and then every six years. They must retire at age 70.

John A. ("Jack") LaSota is a former Arizona Attorney General (1977–1978). LaSota also served as Bruce Babbitt's Chief of Staff when the former was governor of Arizona. He is a lobbyist for the firm LaSota & Peters, P.L.C.

Powers and duties

While the state constitution establishes the office of Attorney General, it does not prescribe the powers of the office. Instead, the Arizona Constitution expressly provides that the powers and duties of the state attorney general are to be prescribed by the Arizona State Legislature. [8] In pursuance of this constitutional mandate, the Arizona Legislature has prescribed that, under A.R.S. §41-193(A)(1) – §41-193(A)(8), the Attorney General of Arizona, through the Arizona Department of Law, shall:

Arizona State Legislature

The Arizona State Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Arizona. It is a bicameral legislature that consists of a lower house, the House of Representatives, and an upper house, the Senate. Composed of 90 legislators, the state legislature meets in the Capitol Complex in the state capital of Phoenix, Arizona. Created by the Arizona Constitution upon statehood in 1912, the Arizona State Legislature met biennially until 1950. Today, they meet annually.

The Arizona Revised Statutes (ARS) is the name given to the statutory laws in the state of Arizona. The ARS went into effect on January 9, 1956. It was most recently updated in the first regular session of the 53rd legislature. There are currently 49 titles, although three have been repealed.

  1. Prosecute and defend in the state supreme court all proceedings in which the state or an officer thereof is a party ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(1); [9]
  2. Under certain conditions, prosecute and defend any proceeding in all other courts of the state, in which the state or an officer thereof is a party or has an interest ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(2); [10]
  3. Represent the state in any action in a federal court ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(3); [11]
  4. Exercise supervisory powers over county attorneys ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(4); [12]
  5. Under certain conditions, assist any county attorney in the discharge of their duties ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(5); [13]
  6. Maintain a docket of all proceedings in which the attorney general is required to appear ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(6); [14]
  7. Issue attorney general opinions on questions of law to state officers and agencies ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(7); [15] and
  8. Perform other duties prescribed by law ~ A.R.S. §41-193(A)(8). [16]

Arizona Attorneys General

Arizona Territory

Coles Bashford governor of Wisconsin, Arizona Territory politician

Coles Bashford was an American lawyer and politician who became the fifth Governor of Wisconsin, and one of the founders of the U.S. Republican Party. His one term as governor ended in a bribery scandal that ended in him fleeing Wisconsin, but he was later instrumental in the government of the newly formed Arizona Territory.

Granville Henderson Oury American politician, judge, miner and lawyer

Granville Henderson Oury was a nineteenth-century American politician, lawyer, judge, soldier, and miner.

Clark Churchill

Clark Churchill was an attorney and politician in the American territory of Arizona. He is best remembered for having served as the Attorney General of Arizona from 1883 to 1885.

State of Arizona

#NamePolitical PartyTerm of Office
1 George Purdy Bullard Democratic1912–1915
2 Wiley E. Jones Democratic1915–1921
3 W. J. Galbraith Republican1921–1923
4 John W. Murphy Democratic1923–1928
5 K. Berry Peterson Democratic1928–1933
6 Arthur T. LaPrade Democratic1933–1935
7 John L. Sullivan Democratic1935–1937
8 Joe Conway Democratic1937–1944
10 John L. Sullivan Democratic1944–1948
11 Evo Anton DeConcini Democratic1948–1949
12 Fred O. Wilson Democratic1949–1953
13 Ross F. Jones Republican1953–1955
14 Robert Morrison Democratic1955–1960
15 Wade Church Democratic1960–1961
16 Robert Pickrell Democratic1961–1965
17 Darrell F. Smith Republican1965–1968
18 Gary K. Nelson Republican1969–1974
19 N. Warner Lee Republican1974–1975
20 Bruce Babbitt Democratic1975–1978
21 John A. (“Jack”) LaSota, Jr. Democratic1978–1979
22 Robert K. Corbin Republican1979–1991
23 Grant Woods Republican1991–1999
24 Janet Napolitano Democratic1999–2003
25 Terry Goddard Democratic2003–2011
26 Tom Horne Republican2011–2015
27 Mark Brnovich Republican2015–present

Related Research Articles

Article Six of the United States Constitution Provides for the supremacy of federal law over state law, among other provisions

Article Six of the United States Constitution establishes the laws and treaties of the United States made in accordance with it as the supreme law of the land, forbids a religious test as a requirement for holding a governmental position and holds the United States under the Constitution responsible for debts incurred by the United States under the Articles of Confederation.

In most common law jurisdictions, the attorney general or attorney-general is the main legal advisor to the government. The plural is attorneys general (traditional) or attorney generals.

A solicitor general or solicitor-general, in common law countries, is usually a legal officer who is the chief representative of a regional or national government in courtroom proceedings. In systems that have an attorney-general, the solicitor general is often the second-ranked law officer of the state and a deputy of the attorney-general. The extent to which a solicitor general actually provides legal advice to or represents the government in court varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and sometimes between individual office holders in the same jurisdiction.

Quebec Resolutions

The Quebec Resolutions, also known as the seventy-two resolutions, were a group of statements written at the Quebec Conference of 1864, which laid out the framework for the Canadian Constitution. They were adopted by the majority of the provinces of Canada, and became the basis for the London Conference of 1866. Some of the major points that were addressed in the resolutions are as follows: Canada will have a strong central government, the central government is to be responsible for the legislation of peace, order and good government, provinces will have defined powers and will be accountable for handling local affairs and social and cultural issues, the United Province of Canada, will be split into Quebec and Ontario, a federal government will be composed of two law making houses. These are just five of the important acts used to construct Canada as it is today.

Constitution of Connecticut

The Constitution of the State of Connecticut is the basic governing document of the U.S. state of Connecticut. It was approved by referendum on December 14, 1965, and proclaimed by the governor as adopted on December 30. It comprises 14 articles and has been amended 31 times.

Constitution of Michigan

The Constitution of the State of Michigan is the governing document of the U.S. state of Michigan. It describes the structure and function of the state's government.

Attorney General of New York attorney general for the U.S. state of New York

The Attorney General of New York is the chief legal officer of the U.S. state of New York and head of the Department of Law of the state government. The office has been in existence in some form since 1626, under the Dutch colonial government of New York.

Attorney General of Malaysia

The Attorney General of Malaysia is the principal legal adviser to the Government of Malaysia. The Attorney General is also the highest ranking public prosecutor in the country and is also known as the Public Prosecutor, or simply PP. The powers with regards to prosecution is contained in Article 145(3) of the Federal Constitution. For instance, exercisable at his discretion, the Attorney General may institute, conduct or discontinue any proceedings for an offence, other than proceedings before a Syariah court, a native court or a court-martial.

The New Hampshire Attorney General is a constitutional officer of the U.S. state of New Hampshire who serves as head of the New Hampshire Department of Justice. The current state Attorney General is Gordon MacDonald.

Constitution of Oklahoma

The Constitution of the State of Oklahoma is the governing document of the U.S. State of Oklahoma. Adopted in 1907, Oklahoma ratified the United States Constitution on November 16, 1907, as the 46th U.S. state. At its ratification, the Oklahoma Constitution was the most lengthy governing document of any government in the U.S. All U.S. state constitutions are subject to federal judicial review; any provision can be nullified if it conflicts with the U.S. Constitution.

Attorney General of Oklahoma attorney general for the U.S. state of Oklahoma

The Attorney General of Oklahoma is the State Attorney General for the state of Oklahoma. The attorney general serves as the chief legal and law enforcement officer of the State of Oklahoma. As head of the Office of the Oklahoma Attorney General, he or she is responsible for providing legal advice to the other departments and agencies of the executive branch, legislative branch and judicial branch of the state government. The attorney general is also responsible for the prosecution of offenses to Oklahoma law and advocate for the basic legal rights of Oklahoma residents.

Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary

The Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary is one of the two independent courts in the Oklahoma judiciary and has exclusive jurisdiction in adjudicating discipline and hearing cases involving the removal of a judge from office, excluding the Oklahoma Supreme Court, exercising judicial power under the Oklahoma Constitution.

Michigan Attorney General attorney general for the U.S. state of Michigan

The Attorney General of Michigan is the fourth-ranking official in the U.S. state of Michigan. The officeholder is elected statewide in the November general election alongside the governor, lieutenant governor, secretary of state, members of the Senate and members of the House of Representatives.

Government of Oklahoma

The government of the U.S. State of Oklahoma, established by the Oklahoma Constitution, is a republican democracy modeled after the federal government of the United States. The state government has three branches: the executive, legislative, and judicial. Through a system of separation of powers or "checks and balances," each of these branches has some authority to act on its own, some authority to regulate the other two branches, and has some of its own authority, in turn, regulated by the other branches.

Oregon Attorney General attorney general for the U.S. state of Oregon

The Oregon Attorney General is a statutory office within the executive branch of the state of Oregon, and serves as the chief legal officer of the state, heading its Department of Justice with its six operating divisions. The Attorney General is chosen by statewide partisan election to serve a term of four years. The incumbent, Ellen Rosenblum, was sworn in on June 29, 2012, replacing John Kroger, a Democrat who was elected in 2008 and resigned six months before the end of his term to become President of Reed College. She was re-elected in 2016.

The Constitution of the State of Maine established the "State of Maine" in 1820 and is the fundamental governing document of the state. It consists of a Preamble and ten Articles (divisions), the first of which is a "Declaration of Rights".

The government of Virginia combines the three branches of authority in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The current Governor of Virginia is Ralph Northam. The State Capitol building in Richmond was designed by Thomas Jefferson, and the cornerstone was laid by Governor Patrick Henry in 1785. Virginia currently functions under the 1971 Constitution of Virginia. It is the Commonwealth's seventh constitution. Under the Constitution, the government is composed of three branches, the legislative, the executive and the judicial.

Oklahoma Emergency Interim Executive and Judicial Succession Act

The Emergency Interim Executive and Judicial Succession Act is an Oklahoma state law governing emergency succession to the all offices of the state and local governments, excluding the members of the Oklahoma Legislature, which are governed by the Oklahoma Emergency Management Interim Legislative Succession Act.

Office of the Solicitor General of the Philippines

The Office of the Solicitor General of the Philippines, formerly known as the Bureau of Justice, is an independent and autonomous office attached to the Department of Justice.

References

  1. 1 2 "A.R.S. §41-192 | Powers and duties of attorney general; restrictions on state agencies as to legal counsel; exceptions; compromise and settlement monies". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 18 January 2019. The attorney general shall have charge of and direct the department of law and shall serve as chief legal officer of the state […] (A.R.S. §41-192).
  2. "A.R.S. §41-193 | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 18 January 2019. The department of law shall be composed of the attorney general and the subdivisions of the department created as provided in this article […] (A.R.S. §41-193).
  3. "About the Office of Attorney General". Arizona Attorney General’s Office. State of Arizona. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  4. "Arizona Attorney General's Office | AGO Organization" (PDF). Arizona Attorney General. State of Arizona. 14 January 2019. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  5. "Arizona Constitution, article 5, section 2". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 18 January 2019. No person shall be eligible to any of the offices mentioned in section 1 of this article except a person of the age of not less than twenty-five years, who shall have been for ten years next preceding his election a citizen of the United States, and for five years next preceding his election a citizen of Arizona (Arizona Const., article 5, section 2).
  6. "A.R.S. §41-191(A) | Attorney general; qualifications; salary; assistants; fees; exceptions; outside counsel". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 18 January 2019. The attorney general shall have been for not less than five years immediately preceding the date of taking office a practicing attorney before the supreme court of the state. He is entitled to receive an annual salary pursuant to section 41-190 (A.R.S. §41-191(A).
  7. "State ex rel. Sawyer v. LaSota, 119 Ariz. 253 (1978)". Court Listener. Free Law Project. Retrieved 18 January 2019.
  8. "Arizona Constitution, Article V, §9". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. The powers and duties of secretary of state, state treasurer, attorney-general, and superintendent of public instruction shall be as prescribed by law.
  9. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(1) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [p]rosecute and defend in the supreme court all proceedings in which the state or an officer thereof in his official capacity is a party.
  10. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(2) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [a]t the direction of the governor or when deemed necessary by the attorney general, prosecute and defend any proceeding in a state court other than the supreme court in which the state or an officer thereof is a party or has an interest.
  11. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(3) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [r]epresent the state in any action in a federal court, the cost thereof and the expenses of the attorney general incurred therein to be a charge against the state.
  12. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(4) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [e]xercise Exercise supervisory powers over county attorneys of the several counties in matters pertaining to that office and require reports relating to the public business thereof.
  13. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(5) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [a]t the direction of the governor, or when deemed necessary, assist any of the county attorneys in the discharge of their duties.
  14. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(6) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [m]aintain a docket of all proceedings in which the attorney general is required to appear, showing the condition thereof, the proceedings therein, the proceedings subsequent to judgment and the reasons for any delay of execution.
  15. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(7) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [u]pon demand by the legislature, or either house or any member thereof, any public officer of the state or a county attorney, render a written opinion upon any question of law relating to their offices. Such opinions shall be public records.
  16. "A.R.S. §41-193(A)(8) | Department of law; composition; powers and duties". Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona. Retrieved 4 February 2019. [The attorney general shall] […] [p]erform other duties prescribed by law.