Seal of Arizona

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The Great Seal of the State of Arizona
Arizona-StateSeal.svg
Versions
Arizona Territory seal c1864.jpg
Original Territorial seal
Arizona Territory seal.jpg
Second Territorial seal
Armiger State of Arizona
Adopted1912
Motto Ditat Deus (God enriches)

The Great Seal of the State of Arizona

According to Article 22, Section 20 of the State of Arizona Constitution by the Arizona State Legislature: [1]

The Constitution of the State of Arizona is the governing document and framework for the U.S. state of Arizona. The current constitution is the first and only adopted by the state of Arizona.

Contents

20. Design of state seal

Section 20. "The seal of the State shall be of the following design: In the background shall be a range of mountains, with the sun rising behind the peaks thereof, and at the right side of the range of mountains there shall be a storage reservoir and a dam, below which in the middle distance are irrigated fields and orchards reaching into the foreground, at the right of which are cattle grazing. To the left in the middle distance on a mountainside is a quartz mill in front of which and in the foreground is a miner standing with pick and shovel. Above this device shall be the motto: "Ditat Deus." In a circular band surrounding the whole device shall be inscribed: "Great Seal of The State of Arizona", with the year of admission of the State into the Union."

According to state statute (Arizona law) the State of Arizona, Secretary of State [2] is the keeper of the seal, and may grant a certificate of approval for a state agency. The use of the seal cannot be used outside of state government. Any person who knowingly violates the law is guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. It cannot be used for commercial purposes under Arizona state law.

Secretary of State of Arizona an elected position in the U.S. state of Arizona

The Secretary of State of Arizona is an elected position in the U.S. state of Arizona. Since Arizona does not have a lieutenant governor, the Secretary stands first in the line of succession to the governorship. The Secretary also serves as acting governor whenever the governor is incapacitated or out of state. The Secretary is the keeper of the Seal of Arizona and administers oaths of office. The current secretary is Katie Hobbs.

History

The "official" Arizona State Seal was designed by Phoenix newspaper artist, E.E. Motter.

https://azsos.gov/about-office/great-seal-arizona

History and a downloadable brochure can be found on the Secretary's website.

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References

  1. "Format Document". www.azleg.gov. Retrieved 2017-08-29.
  2. "The Great Seal of Arizona". Arizona Secretary of State. 2014-06-02. Retrieved 2017-08-29.