Pinal County, Arizona

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Pinal County, Arizona
Second Pinal county courthouse.jpg
Pinal County, Arizona seal.png
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting Pinal County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of USA AZ.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 1, 1875
Seat Florence
Largest city San Tan Valley
Casa Grande (incorporated)
Area
  Total5,374 sq mi (13,919 km2)
  Land5,366 sq mi (13,898 km2)
  Water8.6 sq mi (22 km2), 0.2%
Population (est.)
  (2018)447,138
  Density80/sq mi (30/km2)
Congressional districts 1st, 3rd, 4th
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7
Website www.pinalcountyaz.gov

Pinal County is a county in the central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. According to U.S. Census Bureau estimates in 2018, the population of the county was 447,138, [1] making it Arizona's third-most populous county. The county seat is Florence. The county was founded in 1875.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

Contents

Pinal County contains parts of the Tohono Oʼodham Nation, the Gila River Indian Community and the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, as well as the entirety of the Ak-Chin Indian Community.

Tohono Oʼodham Nation Reservation

The Tohono Oʼodham Nation is the collective government body of the Tohono Oʼodham tribe in the United States. The Tohono Oʼodham Nation governs four separate pieces of land with a combined area of 2.8 million acres (11,330 km2), the second largest Native American land holding in the United States. These lands are located within the Sonoran Desert of south central Arizona and are directly exposed to the Mexico–United States border for 74 miles (119 km) along its southern border. The Nation is organized into 11 local districts and employs a tripartite system of government. Sells, Arizona, is the Nation's largest community and functions as its capital. The Nation has approximately 34,000 enrolled members, the majority of whom live off of the reservations.

Gila River Indian Community

The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) is an Indian reservation in the U.S. state of Arizona, lying adjacent to the south side of the city of Phoenix, within the Phoenix Metropolitan Area in Pinal and Maricopa counties. Gila River Indian Reservation was established in 1859, and the Gila River Indian Community formally established by Congress in 1939. The community is home for members of both the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and the Pee-Posh (Maricopa) tribes.

San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation Indian reservation

The San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, in southeastern Arizona, United States, was established in 1872 as a reservation for the Chiricahua Apache tribe as well as surrounding Yavapai and Apache bands forcibly removed from their original homelands under a strategy devised by General George Crook of using an Apache to catch an Apache. Also known as "Hell's Forty Acres" under United States occupation because of deplorable health and environmental conditions, today's San Carlos Apaches successfully operate a Chamber of Commerce, the Apache Gold Casino, a Language Preservation program, a Culture Center, and a Tribal College.

Pinal County is included in the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona Metropolitan Statistical Area. Suburban growth southward from greater Phoenix has begun to spread into the northern parts of the county; similarly, growth northward from Tucson is spreading into the southern portions of the county. The Pinal County cities of Maricopa and Casa Grande, as well as many unincorporated areas, have shown accelerated growth patterns in recent years; such suburban development is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

Phoenix, Arizona State capital city in Arizona, United States

Phoenix is the capital and most populous city of Arizona, with 1,626,000 people. It is also the fifth most populous city in the United States, and the most populous American state capital, and the only state capital with a population of more than one million residents.

Mesa, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Mesa is a city in Maricopa County, in the U.S. state of Arizona. It is a suburb located about 20 miles (32 km) east of Phoenix in the East Valley section of the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. It is bordered by Tempe on the west, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community on the north, Chandler and Gilbert on the south along with Queen Creek, and Apache Junction on the east.

Scottsdale, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Scottsdale is a city in the eastern part of Maricopa County, Arizona, United States, part of the Greater Phoenix Area. Named Scottsdale in 1894 after its founder Winfield Scott, a retired U.S. Army chaplain, the city was incorporated in 1951 with a population of 2,000. The 2015 population of the city was estimated to be 236,839 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The New York Times described downtown Scottsdale as "a desert version of Miami's South Beach" and as having "plenty of late night partying and a buzzing hotel scene." Its slogan is "The West's Most Western Town."

History

Pinal County was carved out of neighboring Maricopa County and Pima County on February 1, 1875 during the Eighth Legislature. Pinal County was the second fastest growing county in the U.S. between 2000 and 2010. [2]

Maricopa County, Arizona County in the United States

Maricopa County is located in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated its population was 4,410,824 as of 2018, making it the state's most populous county, and the fourth-most populous in the United States, containing more than half the population of Arizona. It is more populous than 23 states. The county seat is Phoenix, the state capital and fifth-most populous city in the United States.

Pima County, Arizona County in the United States

Pima County is a county in the south central region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, the population was 980,263, making it Arizona's second-most populous county. The county seat is Tucson, where nearly all of the population is centered. The county is named after the Pima Native Americans who are indigenous to this area.

The 8th Arizona Territorial Legislative Assembly was a session of the Arizona Territorial Legislature which convened from January 4, 1875, till February 12, 1875, in Tucson, Arizona Territory.

In 2010 CNN Money named Pinal County as the 2nd fastest growing county in the USA. [3]

Geography

Picketpost Peak, a prominent landmark above Superior. Pickepost Peak, AZ.jpg
Picketpost Peak, a prominent landmark above Superior.
Spring wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert National Monument. Sondes.jpg
Spring wildflowers in the Sonoran Desert National Monument.
The Queen Creek Tunnel built in 1952 Gila County-Queen Creek Tunnel-Hwy 60 in Gila County-1952-2.jpg
The Queen Creek Tunnel built in 1952

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 5,374 square miles (13,920 km2), of which 5,366 square miles (13,900 km2) is land and 8.6 square miles (22 km2) (0.2%) is water. [4]

Mountain ranges

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1880 3,440
1890 4,25123.6%
1900 7,77983.0%
1910 9,04516.3%
1920 16,13078.3%
1930 22,08136.9%
1940 28,84130.6%
1950 43,19149.8%
1960 62,67345.1%
1970 67,9168.4%
1980 90,91833.9%
1990 116,37928.0%
2000 179,72754.4%
2010 375,770109.1%
Est. 2018447,138 [5] 19.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
1790–1960 [7] 1900–1990 [8]
1990–2000 [9] 2010–2018 [10]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 179,727 people, 61,364 households, and 45,225 families residing in the county. The population density was 34 people per square mile (13/km2). There were 81,154 housing units at an average density of 15/sq mi (6/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 70.42% White, 2.76% Black or African American, 7.81% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 15.66% from other races, and 2.67% from two or more races. 29.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 21.86% reported speaking Spanish at home, while 1.44% speak O'odham and 0.02% speak Apache. [11]

There were 61,364 households out of which 29.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.90% were married couples living together, 11.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.30% were non-families. 21.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.10% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 27.30% from 25 to 44, 22.70% from 45 to 64, and 16.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 114.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 117.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $35,856, and the median income for a family was $39,548. Males had a median income of $31,544 versus $23,726 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,025. About 12.10% of families and 16.90% of the population were below the poverty threshold, including 25.50% of those under age 18 and 8.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 375,770 people, 125,590 households, and 92,157 families residing in the county. [12] The population density was 70.0 inhabitants per square mile (27.0/km2). There were 159,222 housing units at an average density of 29.7 per square mile (11.5/km2). [13] The racial makeup of the county was 72.4% white, 5.6% American Indian, 4.6% black or African American, 1.7% Asian, 0.4% Pacific islander, 11.5% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 28.5% of the population. [12] In terms of ancestry, 16.9% were German, 10.6% were Irish, 9.5% were English, and 2.8% were American. [14]

Of the 125,590 households, 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 26.6% were non-families, and 20.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.21. The median age was 35.3 years. [12]

The median income for a household in the county was $51,310 and the median income for a family was $56,299. Males had a median income of $45,082 versus $34,785 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,716. About 10.1% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.3% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over. [15]

Politics

Before 2000, Pinal was very much a bellwether county in Presidential elections, having supported the winning candidate in every election between Arizona’s statehood in 1912 and 2004 except for that of 1968, when Hubert Humphrey won the county by 3.2 percentage points but lost to Richard M. Nixon. As a result of the urban sprawl from Phoenix spreading into the county, a major political reversal has taken place between it and neighboring Maricopa County since the turn of the millennium. With an increasing number of white conservative residents, Pinal voters now trend more Republican than traditionally conservative Maricopa County as of the 2016 election. Since 2008, Pinal has become a safely Republican county. Donald Trump carried the county by the second-largest margin for a Republican since statehood.

Presidential elections results
Pinal County vote
by party in presidential elections
[16] [17]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 56.2%72,81937.0% 47,8926.8% 8,835
2012 57.1%62,07940.8% 44,3062.1% 2,297
2008 56.4%59,42142.0% 44,2541.6% 1,723
2004 57.3%37,00642.2% 27,2520.6% 364
2000 48.7%20,12247.6% 19,6503.7% 1,518
1996 35.3% 13,03453.1%19,57911.6% 4,282
1992 31.8% 11,66942.1%15,46826.1% 9,602
1988 51.3%14,96647.5% 13,8501.3% 364
1984 57.5%16,46441.7% 11,9230.8% 232
1980 52.4%12,19539.6% 9,2078.0% 1,856
1976 45.4% 9,35451.4%10,5953.2% 655
1972 60.3%10,58436.5% 6,4043.3% 571
1968 42.4% 6,88345.6%7,40912.0% 1,954
1964 41.2% 6,95658.7%9,9110.0% 5
1960 47.1% 6,44152.9%7,2320.1% 11
1956 53.2%5,76246.7% 5,0630.2% 17
1952 52.4%4,98547.6% 4,522
1948 37.9% 2,23260.7%3,5721.4% 83
1944 38.5% 1,90961.0%3,0260.4% 22
1940 31.1% 1,99668.6%4,4110.3% 22
1936 25.0% 1,21671.9%3,4983.2% 154
1932 23.9% 1,00075.0%3,1371.1% 47
1928 53.4%1,63146.5% 1,4190.1% 4
1924 40.9%1,07537.6% 98821.6% 568
1920 54.2%1,49345.9% 1,264
1916 39.2% 85556.5%1,2324.2% 92
1912 9.9% 8043.7% 35246.3%373

Government

Salaries for county elected officials are set by the Arizona Revised Statutes. All county elected officials (except the Sheriff and the County Attorney) make a salary of $63,800, along with county benefits and compulsory participation in the Arizona State Elected Official Retirement Plan. [18]

Economy

As of 2010 the Corrections Corporation of America operated the privately owned Saguaro Correctional Center. [19] located in Eloy in Pinal County, [20] It is paid by the state of Hawaii to house the majority of Hawaii's male prison inmate population. [19]

Communities

Map of incorporated areas and Indian reservations in Pinal County Pinal County Arizona Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Map of incorporated areas and Indian reservations in Pinal County
Native copper with cuprite from the Ray Mine near Kearny Copper-Cuprite-260138.jpg
Native copper with cuprite from the Ray Mine near Kearny

Cities

Towns

Ghost Towns in Pinal County

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Pinal County. [21] [22]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1 San Tan Valley 81,321 CDP
2 Casa Grande 48,751City1879 (founded)
3 Maricopa 43,482City2003
4 Apache Junction (partially in Maricopa County )35,840City1978
5 Marana (mostly in Pima County )34,961Town1977
6 Queen Creek (partially in Maricopa County )26,361Town1990
7Florence 25,536Town1900 [23]
8 Eloy 16,631City1949
9 Coolidge 11,825City1945
10 Arizona City 10,475CDP
11 Gold Canyon 10,159CDP
12 Saddlebrooke 9,614CDP
13 Oracle 3,686CDP
14 San Manuel 3,551CDP
15 Superior 2,837Town1976
16 Sacaton 2,672CDP
17 Red Rock 2,169CDP
18 Kearny 1,950Town1959
19 Mammoth 1,426Town1958
20 Casa Blanca 1,388CDP
21 Dudleyville 959CDP
22 Ak-Chin Village 862CDP
23 Queen Valley 788CDP
24 Stanfield 740CDP
25 Blackwater 725CDP
26 Stotonic Village 659CDP
27 Cactus Forest 594CDP
28 Sacaton Flats Village 541CDP
29Upper Santan Village495CDP
30 Goodyear Village 457CDP
31Lower Santan Village374CDP
32 Winkelman (partially in Gila County)353Town
33 Chuichu 269CDP
34 Top-of-the-World (partially in Gila County)231CDP
35Wet Camp Village229CDP
36Sacate Village169CDP
37Vaiva Vo128CDP
38 Sweet Water Village 83CDP
39 Campo Bonito 74CDP
40 Santa Cruz 37CDP
41 Kohatk 27CDP
42 Tat Momoli 10CDP

See also

Related Research Articles

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Blackwater, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

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Pima people Native American peoples

The Pima are a group of Native Americans living in an area consisting of what is now central and southern Arizona. The majority population of the surviving two bands of the Akimel Oʼodham are based in two reservations: the Keli Akimel Oʼotham on the Gila River Indian Community (GRIC) and the On'k Akimel Oʼodham on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC).

Casa Blanca, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Casa Blanca is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pinal County, Arizona, United States, located in the Gila River Indian Community. The population was 1,388 at the 2010 census.

Pima Villages, sometimes mistakenly called the Pimos Villages in the 19th century, were the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee-Posh (Maricopa) villages in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona. First, recorded by Spanish explorers in the late 17th century as living on the south side of the Gila River, they were included in the Viceroyalty of New Spain, then in Provincias of Sonora, Ostimuri y Sinaloa or New Navarre to 1823. Then from 1824 to 1830, they were part of the Estado de Occidente of Mexico and from September 1830 they were part of the state of Sonora. These were the Pima villages encountered by American fur trappers, traders, soldiers and travelers along the middle Gila River from 1830's into the later 19th century. The Mexican Cession following the Mexican American War left them part of Mexico. The 1853 Gadsden Purchase made their lands part of the United States, Territory of New Mexico. During the American Civil War they became part of the Territory of Arizona.

Hormiguero, Spanish for "anthill",, one of the 19th century Pima Villages, was located along the Gila River, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Hueso Parado, Spanish for “Standing Bone” or El Juez Tarado Spanish for "The Judge Tarado", was the largest village of the Maricopa people in the 19th century, in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

Agua Raiz, Spanish for "Water root" as named in the 1860 Census, it was one of the 19th century Pima Villages, located along the Gila River, near the modern site of Sacate Village, Arizona in what is now the Gila River Indian Community in Pinal County, Arizona.

References

  1. https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF
  2. "PopulationDistributionandChange:2000to2010" (PDF). UnitedStatesCensusBureau. March 2011. p. 9. Retrieved March 26, 2011.
  3. "Fastest Growing U.S. Counties". CNN Money. June 21, 2010. Retrieved March 30, 2014.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 23, 2012. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  5. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  6. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  7. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  8. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  9. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  10. "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  11. "Language Map Data Center". Mla.org. July 17, 2007. Retrieved August 17, 2012.
  12. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  13. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  14. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  15. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2016-01-20.
  16. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-06-12.
  17. Scammon, Richard M. (compiler); America at the Polls: A Handbook of Presidential Election Statistics 1920-1964; pp. 42-44 ISBN   0405077114
  18. "Arizona Revised Statutes". Azleg.gov. Retrieved 2012-08-17.
  19. 1 2 Brady, Kat. "Using private prisons costs more than it seems." (editorial) Honolulu Star Advertiser . June 18, 2010. Retrieved on September 29, 2010.
  20. "Saguaro Correctional Center." Corrections Corporation of America. Retrieved on September 30, 2010.
  21. https://www.census.gov/2010census/
  22. https://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/maps/block/2010/
  23. http://www.leagueaz.org/lgd/index.cfm?area=main&cid=25

Coordinates: 32°59′13″N111°19′38″W / 32.98694°N 111.32722°W / 32.98694; -111.32722